OPINION: What Ends During the Pandemic Starts Again Somewhere Else

by Julie Pham


It didn’t hit me that the office where my parents ran a Vietnamese-language newspaper for decades was really closed until I noticed I still have a key on my chain that I no longer use.

My younger brother and I had been preparing for the shutdown of the office since July. On weekends, we’d sift through 36 years of existence packed into 1050 square feet. Binders of old invoices and advertising orders, stacks of newspapers and Vietnamese music CDs were stuffed inside the drawers of executive desks made of cheap wood with “mahogany” veneer, hefty enough to withstand the bulky monitors and desktops of the 1990s. The stuff stored there wasn’t just work-related. My brothers and I were also guilty of leaving our odd pieces of clothing, sporting equipment, and high school yearbooks at the office. 

The adrenaline needed to constantly sift, pack, and then haul to the dump fueled me just enough to get through the over three tons of trash. When we were done, I had no energy left to feel sad. 

The pandemic has many victims. Aside from the over half million who have died and the nearly 10 million who are still unemployed because of COVID, there have been over 300,000 businesses that have closed since February last year.

Our newspaper, a business started by my parents in 1986 to serve the growing Vietnamese immigrant community, hasn’t closed … yet. For now, it’s just our physical office that is closed. We are certain it will never open again. I haven’t been able to find a stat around how many businesses have moved to remote work completely. 

Even before the pandemic, we had considered closing the newspaper office as a way to reduce expenses. We took pride in being one of the only two Vietnamese newspapers that had an office outside the owners’ home. An office represented professionalism. It also meant customers could come by the office to pick up newspapers and place ads. Anticipation filled the air on Fridays, when the newspaper came out. People would pick up a newspaper when they went grocery shopping for the week. Over the years, the sign with the name of the newspaper, “Nguoi Viet” faded to a faint pink, a shadow of the bold red it once was when we first moved in. 

The office was sandwiched between a foot massage parlour and a mortgage broker and down the corridor from a school for nursing assistants. Although the neighborhood was getting a bit more gentrified because of the Light Rail station built across the street and expensive highrise housing that soon followed, the shopping center we were located in became increasingly run down. Over time, we opted to use the elevator instead of the stairs to avoid encounters with those passed out on steps. The pandemic halted the already slowing activity. With the governor’s orders in March, my parents and the newspaper staff started working from home. The Vietnamese community events that the newspaper used to cover religiously ended as well. Advertising dried up, as many of the Vietnamese-owned mom and pop shops, restaurants, and nail salons had to close temporarily. 

In August, we began the process of getting rid of the furniture. I posted on my Facebook page photos of items available for free as long as they could be picked up. The pandemic caused a shortage in desks and appliances. The refrigerator was claimed first. One acquaintance lamented the lack of desks for purchase for her two sons on Facebook and I privately offered desks and bookshelves. Another friend who came for the fridge realized she also wanted the big leather couch. She enlisted her neighbor, a professional rodent catcher with a full-sized pickup truck, to make numerous trips to transport the goods. We used our vinyl event banners to protect the furniture and I smiled at the image of a Vietnamese singer flapping as the truck drove away. Bit by bit, people claimed and picked up most of what I advertised. I was amazed by who responded and the various ways they transported the furniture away. One month before everything shut down in Washington, we had managed to give away 20 banker boxes of Vietnamese-language books and newspapers to the University of Washington.

In the end, parts of Washington’s longest-running Vietnamese newspaper found new homes throughout the community, mainly with immigrants from other countries: in a Somali family’s home office in Renton; in the community space of a small nonprofit run out of a Guyanese woman’s home in Bellevue; in the house of a South African couple with a newborn baby in Tacoma; in a Millennial couple’s apartment in Pioneer square; at the University of Washington’s Southeast Asian Collection; in an African-American-owned fashion store called Platinum Plush up the street on Martin Luther King Jr. Way South; and in the community center space of the nonprofit Friends of Little Saigon in the International District. The bookcases, the dishware, the couch all had new lives, with new owners.

One friend later told me, “It is not just a couch for me, it’s meaningful. Thanks for the difference you made in my life.”

We have been both donors and recipients. Two years ago, a high school friend of mine was moving and offered to give us an 8-person high dining room table with matching bar stools that didn’t fit into her new home. Her boyfriend even delivered it in his pickup truck from Wallingford to my parents’ home in Newcastle. Now we use that table as the standing work desk hub. My father is there every morning, starting around 5 a.m., working on the upcoming newspaper. None of us could have predicted that what once was used for her vegetarian dinner parties would be the new “office” for a Vietnamese newspaper. 

January marked the last official month of my family having a “professional” office. In closing it down, I came to redefine what an “office” means. The pandemic expedited the inevitable. I also witnessed what it feels like to be a part of a community that shares whatever we have, including the time and labor it takes to transport something from one home to its new owners. 

I’m keeping the newspaper office key on my chain. It serves as a reminder of what I once deeply believed so that I can appreciate what I have since learned.

For the Vietnamese version on Northwest Vietnamese News, please read here or below.


Julie Pham, PhD, is the CEO at CuriosityBased, a consulting practice focused on fostering collaboration, connection, and communication. She grew up in Seattle, after immigrating to the United States as a refugee from Vietnam. She co-owns Northwest Vietnamese News with her family.

Featured image by Alex Garland.


Vietnamese version:

Không có gì ngạc nhiên khi văn phòng nơi cha mẹ tôi điều hành một tờ báo Việt ngữ trong nhiều thập kỷ, đã thực sự đóng cửa cho đến khi tôi nhận thấy tôi vẫn còn một chiếc chìa khóa trên dây chuyền mà tôi không còn sử dụng nữa.

Tôi và em trai tôi đã chuẩn bị cho việc đóng cửa văn phòng từ tháng Bảy. Vào cuối tuần, chúng tôi sẽ sàng lọc 36 năm tồn tại được gói gọn trong 1050 bộ vuông. Những cuốn hóa đơn cũ và đơn đặt hàng quảng cáo, những xấp báo và đĩa nhạc Việt Nam được nhét trong ngăn kéo của bàn giám đốc làm bằng gỗ rẻ tiền với veneer “mahogany”, đủ nặng để chống chọi với những màn hình và máy tính để bàn cồng kềnh của những năm 1990. Những thứ được lưu trữ ở đó không chỉ liên quan đến công việc. Các anh trai của tôi và tôi cũng có lỗi khi để những bộ quần áo, dụng cụ thể thao và kỷ yếu trung học kỳ quặc của chúng tôi ở văn phòng.

Chất adrenaline cần thiết để liên tục sàng lọc, đóng gói và sau đó vận chuyển đến bãi chứa đã cung cấp năng lượng cho tôi vừa đủ để vượt qua hơn ba tấn rác. Khi chúng tôi làm xong, tôi không còn năng lượng để cảm thấy buồn.

Đại dịch có rất nhiều nạn nhân. Ngoài hơn nửa triệu người đã chết, gần 10 triệu người vẫn đang thất nghiệp vì COVID, đã có hơn 300.000 doanh nghiệp phải đóng cửa kể từ tháng 2 năm ngoái.

Tờ báo của chúng tôi, một cơ sở kinh doanh do cha mẹ tôi thành lập vào năm 1986 để phục vụ cộng đồng di dân Việt Nam đang phát triển, vẫn chưa đóng cửa … vẫn chưa đóng cửa. Hiện tại, chỉ có văn phòng thực của chúng tôi đã đóng cửa. Chúng tôi chắc chắn rằng nó sẽ không bao giờ mở lại. Tôi không thể tìm thấy thống kê về số lượng doanh nghiệp đã chuyển hẳn sang làm việc từ xa.

Ngay cả trước khi xảy ra đại dịch, chúng tôi đã tính đến việc đóng cửa tòa soạn báo như một cách để giảm chi phí. Chúng tôi tự hào là một trong hai tờ báo Việt Nam duy nhất có văn phòng bên ngoài nhà riêng. Một văn phòng thể hiện sự chuyên nghiệp. Điều đó cũng có nghĩa là khách hàng có thể đến văn phòng để lấy báo và đặt quảng cáo. Sự mong đợi tràn ngập không khí vào các ngày thứ Sáu, khi tờ báo ra mắt. Mọi người sẽ nhặt một tờ báo khi họ đi mua hàng tạp hóa trong tuần. Theo năm tháng, tấm biển ghi tên tờ báo Người Việt phai màu hồng nhạt, bóng một màu đỏ đậm như thuở chúng tôi mới chuyển đến

Văn phòng bị kẹp giữa một tiệm mát-xa chân và một công ty môi giới thế chấp và nó nằm dọc hành lang từ một trường học dành cho trợ lý điều dưỡng. Mặc dù khu vực lân cận đã trở nên sang trọng hơn một chút vì ga Đường sắt nhẹ được xây dựng bên kia đường và những khu nhà ở cao cấp đắt tiền ngay sau đó, nhưng trung tâm mua sắm mà chúng tôi đang ở ngày càng trở nên đi xuống. Theo thời gian, chúng tôi đã chọn sử dụng thang máy thay vì thang bộ để tránh gặp phải những người đi qua các bậc thang. Đại dịch đã tạm dừng hoạt động vốn đã chậm lại. Với lệnh của thống đốc vào tháng 3, cha mẹ tôi và các nhân viên tờ báo bắt đầu làm việc tại nhà. Các sự kiện cộng đồng Việt Nam mà tờ báo sử dụng để đưa tin về mặt tôn giáo cũng kết thúc. Quảng cáo cạn kiệt, nhiều cửa hàng mẹ và cửa hàng nhạc pop, nhà hàng và tiệm nail do người Việt làm chủ phải tạm thời đóng cửa.

Vào tháng 8, chúng tôi bắt đầu quá trình thu dọn đồ đạc. Tôi đã đăng lên trang Facebook của mình những bức ảnh về những món đồ có sẵn miễn phí miễn là có thể nhặt được. Đại dịch đã gây ra tình trạng thiếu bàn làm việc và các thiết bị gia dụng. Tủ lạnh được yêu cầu đầu tiên. Một người quen đã than thở về việc thiếu bàn học để mua cho hai con trai của cô ấy trên Facebook và tôi đã cung cấp riêng bàn làm việc và giá sách. Một người bạn khác đến lấy tủ lạnh nhận ra cô ấy cũng muốn chiếc ghế dài bọc da lớn. Cô đã tranh thủ người hàng xóm của mình, một người bắt chuột chuyên nghiệp với một chiếc xe bán tải cỡ lớn, thực hiện nhiều chuyến đi để vận chuyển hàng hóa. Chúng tôi đã sử dụng băng rôn sự kiện bằng nhựa vinyl để bảo vệ đồ đạc và tôi mỉm cười trước hình ảnh một ca sĩ Việt Nam vỗ tay khi chiếc xe tải lao đi. Từng chút một, mọi người đã tuyên bố và chọn hầu hết những gì tôi được quảng cáo. Tôi vô cùng ngạc nhiên bởi ai đã trả lời và cách họ vận chuyển đồ đạc đi theo nhiều cách khác nhau. Một tháng trước khi mọi thứ đóng cửa ở Washington, chúng tôi đã cố gắng trao tặng 20 thùng sách báo tiếng Việt cho Đại học Washington.

Một người bạn sau đó đã nói với tôi, “Nó không chỉ là một chiếc ghế dài đối với tôi, nó còn có ý nghĩa. Cảm ơn vì sự khác biệt mà bạn đã tạo ra trong cuộc đời tôi ”.

Chúng tôi vừa là người cho vừa là người nhận. Hai năm trước, một người bạn trung học của tôi chuyển đến và đề nghị tặng chúng tôi một chiếc bàn ăn cao cho 8 người với những chiếc ghế đẩu phù hợp với quầy bar không phù hợp với ngôi nhà mới của cô ấy. Bạn trai của cô ấy thậm chí còn giao nó bằng xe bán tải của anh ấy từ Wallingford đến nhà bố mẹ tôi ở Newcastle. Bây giờ chúng tôi sử dụng chiếc bàn đó làm trung tâm bàn làm việc đứng. Cha tôi ở đó mỗi sáng, bắt đầu từ khoảng 5 giờ sáng, làm việc trên tờ báo sắp ra mắt. Không ai trong chúng tôi có thể đoán được rằng thứ từng được dùng cho các bữa tiệc chay của bà sẽ là “văn phòng” mới của một tờ báo Việt Nam.

Tháng Giêng đánh dấu tháng chính thức cuối cùng gia đình tôi có một văn phòng “chuyên nghiệp”. Cuối cùng, tôi đã định nghĩa lại “văn phòng” nghĩa là gì. Đại dịch tiến triển là điều không thể tránh khỏi. Tôi cũng đã chứng kiến ​​cảm giác như thế nào khi trở thành một phần của cộng đồng chia sẻ bất cứ thứ gì chúng ta có, bao gồm cả thời gian và công sức để vận chuyển thứ gì đó từ nhà này đến chủ nhân mới của nó.

Tôi đang giữ chìa khóa văn phòng báo trên dây chuyền của mình. Nó như một lời nhắc nhở về những gì tôi đã từng tin tưởng sâu sắc để tôi có thể đánh giá cao những gì tôi đã học được.

Dòng tiêu đề: Đóng cửa văn phòng vì COVID

Nó không thành công với tôi cho đến khi tôi nhận ra rằng tôi vẫn còn một chiếc chìa khóa trên dây chuyền mà tôi không còn cần đến nữa. Đó là chìa khóa của văn phòng cha mẹ tôi di chuyển tới lui từ năm 1985 rồi,Đấy tạm xem là mái ấm gia đình của Báo Quán- Người Việt Tây Bắc Vietnamese News. Chúng tôi vừa dọn dẹp ngăn nắp và là người cuối cùng khóa cửa.đóng lại văn phòng.

Các em trai của tôi và tôi đã đảm trách việc đóng cửa văn phòng từ tháng Bảy- 2000. Chần chừ mãi, lưu luyến mãi. Mãi cho đến bây giờ, Cứ vào cuối tuần, chúng tôi lại đến và phân loại giấy tờ và hồ sơ. Đó là 36 năm tồn tại được đóng không gian lớn hơn 1000 feet vuông. Bàn làm việc “giám đốc” lớn làm bằng gỗ laminate với veneer mahogany để kê dàn máy điện toán…và màn hình cồng kềnh của những năm 1990. Chúng tôi đã thực hiện rất nhiều cuộc “chạy đổ rác” với các túi rác cho văn phòng vơi dần, vơi dần….

Việc di chuyển liên tục khiến tôi không thể thực sự hiểu được sự thật rằng văn phòng cuối cùng đã phải tự đóng cửa.

Đại dịch có vô số nạn nhân. Ngoài hơn nửa triệu người đã chết, gần 10 triệu người vẫn đang thất nghiệp vì COVID, đã có hơn 300,000 doanh nghiệp đóng cửa kể từ tháng Hai năm ngoái.

Tờ báo của gia đình tôi, do cha mẹ tôi thành lập số ra mắt vào năm 1986 để phục vụ cộng đồng người Việt đang phát triển, vẫn chưa đóng cửa … Hiện tại, chỉ có văn phòng thường trực của chúng tôi đã đóng cửa. Chúng tôi tin chắc rằng nó sẽ không bao giờ có cơ hội mở lại.

Ngay cả trước khi xảy ra đại dịch, chúng tôi đã tính đến việc đóng cửa tòa soạn báo như một cách để giảm chi phí. Chúng tôi tự hào là một trong vài tờ hiếm hoi, khổ công là các tờ báo tờ báo của người Việt Nam có trụ sở ở ngoài nước. Một văn phòng là sự thể hiện tính chuyên nghiệp. Điều đó cũng có nghĩa là khách hàng có thể đến văn phòng có nhân viên thường trực để lấy báo và đặt quảng cáo. Thứ sáu, khi tờ báo ra mắt, có một không khí mong đợi. Có người cầm sẵn ly cà phê nóng trên tay, thong dong đến lấy một hoặc hai tờ. Mọi người sẽ “nhặt” một tờ báo khi họ đi mua hàng tạp hóa, hay đến các déli trong tuần. Theo năm tháng, bảng hiệu “Người Việt” nhạt dần thành màu hồng nhạt, bóng của màu đỏ đậm mà nó từng có. Văn phòng tọa lạc giữa một bên là tiệm “mát-xa chân” và một bên là công ty môi giới thế chấp vay nợ mua nhà, mà anh Trần Phước Bền, cũng thu hẹp văn phòng đem về nhà.. Làm việc, và các văn phòng nằm dọc theo hành lang 1ừ phòng số 101 cho đến cuối hành lang nay là một trường học dành cho trợ lý điều dưỡng, chính phủ muốn giúp tạo thêm công ăn việc làm mà thôi..

Mặc dù khu vực lân cận trở nên nổi tiếng hơn vì có Trạm Xe Tốc Hành- Sound Transit, ở phía bên kia đường và những khu nhà ở cao cấp đắt tiền từng dãy cũng mới xây không lâu ở ngay sau đó. Nhưng trung tâm mua sắm nơi chúng tôi từng gắn bó, hầu như đang ở vào giai đoạn ngày càng trở nên cạn kiệt. Ngoài giờ, chúng tôi ngừng sử dụng cầu thang để ngẫu nhiên đúng lúc gặp gỡ với những người đã ngất xỉu vì ma túy. Đại dịch đã tạm dừng nhiều hoạt động vốn đã chậm lại. Với lệnh của thống đốc vào tháng 3, cha mẹ tôi và các nhân viên tờ báo bắt đầu làm việc tại nhà. Các sự kiện cộng đồng chiếm nhiều trang, cũng như giới thiệu các phạm vi bảo hiểm y tế hay nhân thọ, xe… cũng không còn nữa. Chúng tôi cũng không mất nhiều thời gian để điều hành các hoạt động tại nhà.

Sau đó, chúng tôi bắt đầu quá trình dọn dẹp đồ đạc. Tôi đã đăng lên Facebook những bức ảnh về những món đồ có sẵn miễn phí, miễn là đồng hương, khách hàng, bạn hữu có thể đến nhận về ít món, nhặt nhạnh thấy còn dùng được, kể cả vài thùng thư viện sách lưu trữ.. Có 5-6 thùng sách trao tặng thư viện UW, và cũng có cả Seattle Public Library, . Đại dịch đã gây ra tình trạng thiếu bàn làm việc và các thiết bị gia dụng. Tủ lạnh được yêu cầu một gia đình đến nhận đầu tiên. Một người quen than phiền về việc thiếu bàn học để mua cho hai con trai của cô ấy và tôi đã liên lạc riêng với cô ấy qua tin nhắn trực tiếp với lời đề nghị tặng bàn làm việc và giá sách. Cô ấy đi cùng một chiếc xe tải nhỏ để lấy bàn, tủ sách và màn hình. Người bạn đến lấy tủ lạnh nhận ra cô ấy cũng muốn có chiếc ghế dài bọc da lớn. Từng chút một, người ta khai nhận và nhặt được gần hết đồ đạc. Ngay trước khi đại dịch xảy ra, chúng tôi đã xếp ngăn nắp có được trên 20 thùng sách báo tiếng Việt tặng thư viện đại học, và cả tủ sách Việt ngữ, báo xuân sưu tập từ nhiều năm, CD và DVD ca nhạc cho nhóm bạn trẻ quan tâm đến khu đọc sách của The Friends Of Little SaiGon, để bạn bè sẽ cố mỗi ngày mỗi gia tăng têm, với Phạm Quỳnh và Nguyễn Phượng Chi v,v,,

Cuối cùng, các bộ phận của tờ báo tiếng Việt lâu đời nhất ở Washington đã tìm được những ngôi nhà mới thông qua cộng đồng: trong văn phòng tại nhà của một gia đình Somali ở Renton; trong không gian cộng đồng của một tổ chức phi lợi nhuận nhỏ ở nhà của một phụ nữ Guyan ở Bellevue; trong ngôi nhà của một cặp vợ chồng trẻ Nam Phi với một đứa con sơ sinh ở Tacoma; căn hộ của một cặp vợ chồng ở quảng trường Pioneer; tại thư viện của Đại học Washington; trong một cửa hàng thời trang thuộc sở hữu của người Mỹ gốc Phi Platinum Plush trên đường Martin Luther King Jr. và trong không gian trung tâm cộng đồng của tổ chức phi lợi nhuận Friends of Little Saigon ở Quận Quốc tế. Tôi thích ý tưởng và cảm thấy lòng mình ấm áp hơn, về việc các món đồ dùng và nhiều thùng sách được giữ gìn mỗi ngày mỗi tích lũy để tăng thêm.. Bây giờ chúng có một cuộc sống mới, với những người chủ mới.

Hai mùa xuân trước, một người bạn trung học đang chuyển nhà và đề nghị tặng chúng tôi một chiếc bàn ăn cao bằng gỗ đen, cho 8 người với những chiếc ghế cao cũng mầu đen mun, phù hợp với quầy bar nay không còn phù hợp với ngôi nhà rộng mới dọn vào của cô ấy. Bây giờ chúng tôi sử dụng chiếc bàn đó làm điểm tập trung trình bầy hình thức tờ báo giữa phòng trung làm việc của tờ báo tại nhà của bố mẹ tôi. Cha tôi có mặt ở đó mỗi sáng, bắt đầu từ khoảng 5 giờ sáng, để kiểm tra bố cục, chủ đề của các số báo sắp phát hành. Đồ đạc cũ của cô bạn ấy đã có một cuộc sống mới với chúng tôi. Cô bạn có biết không? Rằng bàn ghế cũ của mình hiện đang là “văn phòng” mới cho một tờ báo tiếng Việt.

 * * 

Với mỗi kết thúc,… đều có một khởi đầu mới.

Hay đúng hơn, mỗi cánh cửa bị khép lại, ta sẽ cố tìm ra một cánh cửa mới sẽ được mở ra . .(Julie Hoài Hương)


Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. 
Support the Emerald!