Black youth hold the banner at the start of King County Equity Now's Juneteenth Freedom March.

PHOTO ESSAY: South End Marks First Federal Juneteenth With Celebration and Joy

by Susan Fried, Ronnie Estoque, and Maile Anderson


From marching, dance, and roller skating, to meditation, music, and a restaurant homecoming, South Seattle marked the first federally recognized Juneteenth 2021 with beautiful spirit and joy. Emerald photographers hit the streets on Saturday to capture some of the many happenings around the South End. Among them: In the morning, “No Healing, No Peace!” A Walking Meditation for Black Liberation was held at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park and Jackson’s Catfish Corner celebrated their grand opening and return to the Central District. In the afternoon, It Takes a Village Juneteenth Festival took place in Othello Park while KCEN’s annual Juneteenth Freedom Celebration marched from 22nd Avenue and Madison Street to Jimi Hendrix Park. Black Girls Roller Skate hosted a Juneteenth roller skating party at Judkins Park and, in the evening, Wa Na Wari wrapped up the day at their Juneteenth Outdoor Celebration with live music.


‘No Healing, No Peace!’ A Walking Meditation for Black Liberation

Two female-presenting individuals sit in MLK Jr. Memorial Park wearing white and speaking into a microphone. One of the individuals is seated before a harp.
Nile’s Edge Healing Arts hosted the “No Healing, No Peace” Walking Meditation for Black Liberation, which included an African centered libation ceremony by Orisade Awodola, healing music and guided meditation by Aishe` Keita, live soundscape by vocalist Porscha Shaw, and celebratory African drum and dance by Sumayya Diop. (Photo: Maile Anderson)
Spectators partake in Nile’s Edge Healing Arts “No Healing, No Peace” Walking Meditation for Black Liberation on Juneteenth 2021.
Spectators partake in Nile’s Edge Healing Arts “No Healing, No Peace” Walking Meditation for Black Liberation on Juneteenth 2021. (Photo: Maile Anderson)

Jackson’s Catfish Corner Grand Opening

Terrell Jackson celebrates the grand reopening of his restaurant, Jackson’s Catfish Corner, with family, friends, and community members on Juneteenth.
Terrell Jackson celebrates the grand reopening of his restaurant, Jackson’s Catfish Corner, with family, friends, and community members on Juneteenth. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Photo of Jackson's Catfish Corner's signature dish.
Jackson’s Catfish Corner has maintained its family recipe for decades, the line for the grand opening filled up the inside of the building space to the sidewalk of Jackson Street. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
The Central Area Collaborative awarded Jackson’s Catfish Corner $5,000 to celebrate the restaurant’s grand reopening in the Central District.
The Central Area Collaborative awarded Jackson’s Catfish Corner $5,000 to celebrate the restaurant’s grand reopening in the Central District. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay congratulates Terrell Jackson on the reopening of his restaurant in the Central District and the importance of locally owned Black businesses in the community.
King County Councilmember Girmay Zahilay congratulates Terrell Jackson on the reopening of his restaurant in the Central District and the importance of locally owned Black businesses in the community. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)

It Takes a Village — Juneteenth Festival in Othello Park

Somali Community Services of Seattle were vendors for the It Takes a Village event at Othello Park.
Somali Community Services of Seattle were vendors for the It Takes a Village event at Othello Park. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Rainier Beach resident and youth Lincoln Wilmore shares a spoken word piece.
Rainier Beach resident and youth Lincoln Wilmore shares a spoken word piece. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Sonya Coleman (middle) celebrates a day of successful sales with her friends.
Sonya Coleman (middle) celebrates a day of successful sales with her friends. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)
Dance Fitness Collective 206 performs choreography during the It Takes a Village event.
Dance Fitness Collective 206 performs choreography during the It Takes a Village event. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)

KCEN’s Juneteenth Freedom March and Celebration

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King County Equity Now’s Juneteenth Freedom March and Celebration began at 22nd Avenue and Madison Street and ended at Jimi Hendrix Park. (Photo: Susan Fried)
(Photo: Susan Fried)
Kibbie Monet gives the Black Power Salute while riding in a car reserved for respected community elders during the Freedom March (Photo: Susan Fried)
Dr. Maxine Mimms, founder of Evergreen State College in Tacoma (Photo: Maile Anderson)
(Photo: Susan Fried)
Spectators gathered in the warm sun to celebrate Juneteenth with King County Equity Now's Freedom March and Celebration in Jimi Hendrix Park.
Spectators gathered in the warm sun to celebrate Juneteenth with King County Equity Now’s Freedom March and Celebration in Jimi Hendrix Park. (Photo: Susan Fried)
A vendor proudly displays their wares at King County Equity Now's Juneteenth Freedom March and Celebration.
Artist Lester Pearson was one of numerous vendors selling their wares at King County Equity Now’s Juneteenth Celebration. (Photo: Susan Fried)

Black Girls Roller Skate Juneteenth Roller Party

Black female-presenting individuals roller skate around Judkins Park for Black Girls Roller Skate's Juneteenth roller skating party.
Black Girls Roller Skate hosted their third annual Juneteenth Soul Skate at Judkins Park. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Third annual Juneteenth Soul Skate at Judkins Park.
Third annual Juneteenth Soul Skate at Judkins Park. (Photo: Susan Fried)

Juneteenth Outdoor Celebration at Wa Na Wari

Photo of a member of the Blue Meadows Trio playing an electric guitar at Wa Na Wari's Juneteenth celebration.
Blue Meadows Trio provided live music at Wa Na Wari’s Juneteenth celebration. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Individuals gathered on the porch of Wa Na Wari to celebrate Juneteenth outside with live music.
Individuals gathered on the porch of Wa Na Wari to celebrate Juneteenth outside with live music. (Photo: Maile Anderson)
The Blue Meadows Trio performed at Wa Na Wari's Juneteenth outdoor celebration.
The Blue Meadows Trio performed at Wa Na Wari’s Juneteenth outdoor celebration. (Photo: Maile Anderson)
Two youth sit on the outdoor steps of Wa Na Wari during the nonprofit's Juneteenth outdoor celebration.
New friends Livingston and Stella, 3, sit on the outdoor steps of Wa Na Wari during the nonprofit’s Juneteenth outdoor celebration. (Photo: Susan Fried)
Individuals gathered in the backyard of Wa Na Wari to celebrate Juneteenth with food, drink, and live music from the Blue Meadows Trio.
Individuals gathered in the backyard of Wa Na Wari to celebrate Juneteenth with food, drink, and live music from the Blue Meadows Trio. (Photo: Susan Fried)

Susan Fried is a 40-year veteran photographer. Her early career included weddings, portraits, commercial work — plus shes been The Skanner’s Seattle photographer for 25 years. Her images have appeared in the University of Washington Daily, the Seattle Globalist, Crosscut, and many more. She’s been an Emerald contributor since 2015. Follow her on Instagram @fried.susan.

Ronnie Estoque is a South Seattle-based freelance photographer and videographer. You can keep up with his work by checking out his website.

Maile Anderson has had the immense privilege to travel to amazing places with a camera beside her. She believes documenting the changing world, whether in the form of protests or other cultures, is important work that heightens awareness in this time of social justice. Follow her on IG: @tinypicturetaker.

📸 Featured Image: Black youth hold the banner at the start of King County Equity Now’s Juneteenth Freedom March. (Photo: Maile Anderson)

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