Bike Works to Host Cycling Trivia Night in Support of Equity Initiatives

by Ben Adlin


South Seattle cycling hub Bike Works will host an online trivia game Thursday evening, meant to raise funds and awareness as the Columbia City nonprofit kicks off its 25th anniversary year with fresh leadership and a renewed focus on racial justice.

Neighbors might know Bike Works for its bright yellow community bike shop on South Ferdinand Street or its roving BikeMobile, which offers free repairs to riders in “bike deserts,” where shops are scarce. Thursday’s trivia event is the latest virtual meetup in a monthly series the group has launched during the pandemic.

Don’t know a crankset from a dereailleur? Don’t worry.

Continue reading Bike Works to Host Cycling Trivia Night in Support of Equity Initiatives

Seattle Fund Will Route $2.17M to Hospitality Workers Who Lost Work Due to COVID-19

by Ben Adlin


A new City-backed fund will send $2.17 million in targeted aid to Seattle hospitality workers who have lost jobs or income due to the pandemic, with affected workers eligible for up to $1,000 in direct cash assistance and as much as $200 more per dependent.

Online applications for the new fund opened last week and will remain open through Feb. 1. Applicants must be residents of Seattle and have worked at a Seattle-based hospitality business, such as a restaurant, bar, or hotel. The precise boundaries of the industry are unclear, so organizers are encouraging anyone who thinks they might be eligible to apply.

Continue reading Seattle Fund Will Route $2.17M to Hospitality Workers Who Lost Work Due to COVID-19

The Morning Update Show — 1/20/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, and whereweconverge.com.

We’ll also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Wednesday, Jan. 20

Biden & Harris Take Oath of Office | New Day in America? | A Look at Policing Legislation in Olympia | LIVE — Kevin Schofield | Mayor Durkan on the OIG’s Sentinel Event Review

Continue reading The Morning Update Show — 1/20/21

Inauguration Reaction: What Biden and Harris’ Inauguration Means to a Black American Man

by M. Anthony Davis


When Trump boarded his helicopter this morning for his final departure as President of the United States, most Americans let out a collective sigh of relief. After four tumultuous years, characterized by emboldened white supremacy and capped by mismanagement of a global pandemic that has claimed over 400,000 American lives, Trump’s tenure as president has finally come to an end.

The inauguration itself, which many feared could possibly fall under attack from the insurrectionists who stormed the capitol a few weeks ago, went relatively smoothly. While the recent acts were acknowledged, they did not overshadow the peaceful transition of power that took place.

The centerpiece of the inauguration, of course, was Joe Biden’s first national address as the 46th president of the United States. He opened with a straightforward reminder that “This is America’s day. This is democracy’s day.” These statements are correct. After an attempt to block democracy, and thus stifle the ideology that this country was founded on, Biden is correct in declaring victory for America and claiming victory for democracy.

The rest of Biden’s inaugural speech faltered. Biden used this speech to reinforce his belief that unification of our country will lead to salvation. However, in his steadfast appeal to bring Americans together, he is leaving out a very important segment of Americans — Black and BIPOC folks. For us, this idea of unity means coming together with those who hate us. Finding common ground with those who continually do us harm.

As a Black man, I have no desire to be at the table with white supremacists. And I have no desire for leadership that believes the answer to collective healing from the ills of white supremacy is to bring everyone together to work out our differences. This is not the time for unity. This is the time for accountability.

Biden acknowledged in his speech that he hears the “cry for racial justice 400 years in the making.” He also spoke about the Emancipation Proclamation and how Lincoln knew that his legacy would be forever tied to that document. For Americans like me, Biden’s current legacy is also tied to a document — The infamous 1994 Crime Bill. If Biden wants his legacy to be comparable to Lincoln’s, we will need more than just fancy words and speeches. We need direct legislation that will improve the lives and ensure the safety of Black and BIPOC Americans.

Even with my reservations on the direction of Biden’s speech, I do feel hopeful for his administration. Despite Biden’s past indiscretion, and Vice President Harris’ past record as a prosecutor which was marked with incidents of injustice, such as the wrongful conviction of Jamal Trulove, who was sentenced in 2010 to 50 years in prison before his retrial and subsequent acquittal in 2015, the Biden administration has a clear path for their first 100 days in office that will help millions of Americans. Announced executive orders include plans and funds for coronavirus vaccinations, extension of the federal rent moratorium, extension of federal student loan deferments, and a federal minimum wage increase to $15 per hour. These steps will immediately improve the lives of suffering Americans and give skeptics like me a reason to believe that perhaps the Biden administration will take steps to improve the lives of working-class Americans.

But as a Black American, I demand more. It’s great to have legislation to help everyone, but I want specific legislation that will help us. If Biden is really serious about healing the wounds of racial inequality in America, then it is fair to expect concrete steps to address the wealth gap and the education gap and an end to mass incarceration. These are the issues plaguing Black Americans across this country and we must be sure to push this administration until these issues are brought to the forefront and addressed directly with legislation that will outlive the current administration. That is the path to Joe Biden building the type of legacy he described this morning.

I am happy that the transition of power was peaceful. I am happy that we have a president with a clear plan for combating COVID. I am happy to have our first woman become vice president. But I will never let go of the Black agenda and I hope that my fellow Americans are also ready to hold Biden to the promises he has made to Black and BIPOC communities.


M. Anthony Davis (Mike Davis) is a local journalist covering arts, culture, and sports.

Featured Image: Inauguration Day Sunrise — attributed to Geoff Livingston under a Creative Commons 2.0 license (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

Before you move on to the next story … 
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. 
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Seedcast: Matt Remle on the Capitol Insurrection and What Happens Next

by Jess Ramirez

Indigenous peoples and communities have long used stories to understand the world and our place in it. Seedcast is a story-centered podcast by Nia Tero and a special monthly column produced in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald about nurturing and rooting stories of the Indigenous experience.


We are living through some of the most historic events in the short history of the United States right now, and there’s a question I can’t shake: how does the reaction of law enforcement to the storming of the Capitol on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, compare to the reaction of law enforcement to Indigenous-led protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline or Standing Rock? We’re spending the first part of 2021 deep in planning for our next set of Seedcast episodes, so here is a separate conversation I had with community steward/organizer and father Matt Remle (Hunkpapa Lakota) about his take on last week’s insurgency, his assessment of the inequalities laid bare, and our hopes and responsibilities in the wake of it. We got to know each other while working on the campaign to get Wells Fargo to divest from the Dakota Access Pipeline. Matt is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and was a local Seattle leader in that campaign.

Continue reading Seedcast: Matt Remle on the Capitol Insurrection and What Happens Next

Seattle’s 39th Annual MLK Jr. March and Celebration

by Susan Fried


The Seattle Martin Luther King Jr. Day march and accompanying events, hosted by Seattle MLK Jr. Organizing Coalition (Seattle MLK), is one of the longest-running MLK Jr. Day celebrations in the country. This year, Seattle MLK adapted to the realities of COVID-19 and, instead of the usual job fair and rally held inside Garfield High School, the 39th-annual event was held entirely online and outside. In-person events on January 18 began in the parking lot in front of Garfield High with a rally that included a speech by Sean Goode, executive director of Choose 180 — an organization designed to help keep youth out of the criminal justice system — as well as performances by singers Sydney Coleman and Nyshae Griffin, and a presentation of a plaque honoring long-time Seattle MLK committee member, Tony Orange, given to his wife. Then, about a thousand people marched downtown to 4th Avenue and held another small rally. 

On their way downtown, the marchers stopped briefly at Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic to show respect for Dr. Ben Danielson, the former senior medical director there, who recently resigned due to allegations of institutional racism at parent organization, Seattle Children’s Hospital. The marchers then continued down Yesler Way to 4th Ave. where another small rally was held, highlighting and critiquing the juvenile justice system, with speeches by civil rights attorney Sadé Smith and performances by D’Mario Carter and E-Rich.

Continue reading Seattle’s 39th Annual MLK Jr. March and Celebration

New SEED Exec. Dir. Michael Seiwerath Brings 20+ Years of Arts, Nonprofit, and Affordable Housing Expertise to South End

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Michael Seiwerath thrives at the intersection of affordable housing and the arts. 

For more than a decade, Seiwerath oversaw fund development, governmental relations, and communications for Community Roots Housing, formerly Capitol Hill Housing, where he was vice president of advancement and external affairs. He was also the founding executive director of Community Roots Housing Foundation, an independent nonprofit which helped fund Community Roots.

Continue reading New SEED Exec. Dir. Michael Seiwerath Brings 20+ Years of Arts, Nonprofit, and Affordable Housing Expertise to South End

The Morning Update Show — 1/19/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, and whereweconverge.com.

We’ll also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Tuesday, Jan. 19

LIVE — OPA Director Andrew Myerberg | A Look Back at MLK Day | A Look Forward to the Inauguration | State Vaccination Plans | Gravbrot’s Got Soul!

Continue reading The Morning Update Show — 1/19/21

A Tale of Two Pandemics

by Shasti Conrad


It is the best of times and the worst of times. A time to celebrate the inauguration of a new president and a history-making vice president. Yet this is also a time of insurrection, impeachment, and a Republican party that continues to fail to take any accountability for lies and inaction in our nation’s capital and here at home.

This is a tale of two pandemics.

Continue reading A Tale of Two Pandemics

The National Day of Racial Healing in the Context of Now

by Melia LaCour


Today is the Fifth-Annual National Day of Racial Healing. Across the country, thousands of people will gather to engage in racial healing programs, discussions, and virtual forums in service of creating a more equitable country.

Launched in 2016 by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation in partnership with hundreds of racial justice activists across the United States, today’s observance comes at a time when our hearts are yearning for it most. With violent surges of white nationalism, the continued devastating rampage of COVID-19 disproportionately impacting Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), the sanctioned murder of Black people, many of us are feeling unfathomable grief, righteous rage, and utter depletion. The need for racial healing is urgent. 

So, what does racial healing mean in the context of now?  And why is racial healing important to our movements for justice?

Continue reading The National Day of Racial Healing in the Context of Now

Amplifying the Authentic Narratives of South Seattle

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