Adefua’s Legacy of African Dance and Culture

by Kathya Alexander The Odunde Festival is an annual harvest festival that celebrates the fruits of labor of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. The word itself means “New Year,” and Adefua Cultural Education Workshop has been celebrating the event here in Seattle for the past 36 years. The theme this year is Reunion, an opportunity … Continue reading Adefua’s Legacy of African Dance and Culture

All That Jazz: The Life and Legacy of Ernestine Anderson

by Kathya Alexander Ernestine Anderson was just 16 years old when she announced to her parents that she was going to leave Seattle and go on the road to sing with a big band. She’d only recently moved to the city from Texas and was attending Garfield High School. Two years later, when the Johnny … Continue reading All That Jazz: The Life and Legacy of Ernestine Anderson

Mama’s Meuzz: The Beauty and Pain of Black Motherhood

by Kathya Alexander On Friday, Nov. 12, Monique Franklin will take the stage to share a reading of her provocative play Mama’z Muezz. The performance starts at 7 p.m. at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. Accompanied by a live four-piece band, Mama’z Meuzz examines the experiences of African American mothers from present-day, historical, and ancestral … Continue reading Mama’s Meuzz: The Beauty and Pain of Black Motherhood

FICTION: The Murder of Emmett Till

by Kathya Alexander The day that the modern Civil Rights movement begin was the day when them white men kill Emmett Till. His mama, Mamie, was sitting on the sofa in her little house on the South Side of Chicago when the call come in that would change her life. Her child was missing from … Continue reading FICTION: The Murder of Emmett Till

‘Reflections’ Dance Festival: A Gift of Indigenous and African American Solidarity

by Kathya Alexander This year’s “Reflections” Dance Festival was filmed in September, bringing the light and sunshine of the summer into the fall to be shared when we need it most. It is a love letter to our beautiful city written in ceremony, ritual, and dance, giving testament to the ways art can heal and … Continue reading ‘Reflections’ Dance Festival: A Gift of Indigenous and African American Solidarity

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at the Seattle Latino Film Festival

by Kathya Alexander The Seattle Latino Film Festival (SLFF) opened for in-person viewing on Friday, Oct. 8, and continues through Sunday, Oct. 17.  The festivities began last Friday at the Seattle Asian Art Museum with an opening night gala and after party reception. Dennis Mencia, a Honduran American actor known for playing Mateo Villanueva on … Continue reading Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at the Seattle Latino Film Festival

FICTION: Freedom Spring

by Kathya Alexander The daffodils dance in the front yard like tornadoes. Red roses climb, wild, to the roof of our house. This Mother’s Day is alive with hope and with morning. ‘Cept for the slash that is running cross my Mama mouth.  She kneading the dough for the biscuits for breakfast. She got the … Continue reading FICTION: Freedom Spring

Drew Hobson: Let the Games Begin

by Kathya Alexander When Drew Hobson got the opportunity to audition for a video game in 2012, he was thrilled. A self-described comic nerd, he was working with a children’s touring company when the theater’s director heard a video game company was having a hard time finding an African American voice for the lead character … Continue reading Drew Hobson: Let the Games Begin

Tyrone Brown: Where Art and Activism Meet

by Kathya Alexander When COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, Tyrone Brown was in Lesotho, an independent country of 2 million people completely surrounded by South Africa. As a volunteer for the Peace Corps, he was teaching English, life skills, and HIV/AIDS prevention to Lesotho elementary school students. But the Peace Corps decided … Continue reading Tyrone Brown: Where Art and Activism Meet

POETRY: Fat Plaits and Ashy Knees

by Kathya Alexander My Mama say when she a girl and she go to school, way back when, sometime back in a whole ‘nother century, that only the white children get to ride on the bus.  Colored children have to walk.  And the white kids pass by and chunk mud rocks at them.  She say the school that she … Continue reading POETRY: Fat Plaits and Ashy Knees