Category Archives: Arts & Culture

PONGO POETRY: My Mind

Pongo Poetry Project’s mission is to engage youth in poetry writing to inspire healing from trauma. For over 20 years, Pongo has mentored poetry with children at the Child Study Treatment Center (CSTC), the only state-run psychiatric hospital for youth in Washington State. Many CSTC youth are coping with severe emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Approximately 40% of youth arrive at CSTC having been court ordered to get treatment; however, by the end of their stay, most youth residents become voluntary participants. Pongo believes there is power in creative expression, and articulating one’s pain to an empathetic audience. Through this special monthly column in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald, Pongo invites readers to bear witness to the pain, resilience, and creative capacity of youth whose voices and perspectives are too often relegated to the periphery.


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26th Annual Seattle Jewish Film Festival Brings Audiences ‘Virtually Together Again’

by Mark Van Streefkerk


The Seattle Jewish Film Festival (SJFF) kicked off Thursday, March 4, featuring 19 films from around the world that celebrate Jewish and Israeli culture. Streaming online March 4 through March 18, the 26th SJFF focuses on themes of levity, laughter, and intercultural sharing, as well as complex topics that are sure to spark conversation. Including at least seven Zoom conversations with filmmakers and guests, as well as several culinary partnerships, this year’s festival is curated to inspire togetherness, even though it’s through a screen.

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FICTION: From the Final Field Notes of a Future Cultural Worker

by Julie-C


The plan is working. Or maybe it’s backfiring. In either case, I have solidified a seat on the newest Citizen Participation Requisite Group (CPRG) of post-Secession Seattle.

This particular CPRG is being convened by a joint effort through the Post-Secession Office of Aesthetic Curation (PSOAC), aided by the Cultural Commodities Bureau (CCB) that operates under the Office of Economic Dominance (OED). Civic bureaucracy, am I right? Shit, I’m practically a walking glossary of municipal acronyms these days, so the systemic matrices aren’t new to me. This recent shift of my own positioning inside it, though, is interesting.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Franklin High School Club Responds to Vandalism With BLM Art

by Susan Fried


On the afternoon of Feb. 26, as unpredictable weather loomed overhead, the students in Franklin High School’s (FHS) Art of Resistance & Resilience Club hung their latest project outside, a group of handmade signs celebrating Black lives and social justice. They attached the project to the fence next to the school’s mural honoring the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panthers, which was vandalized late last year.

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9th Annual Seattle Asian American Film Festival Will Be the Biggest Yet

by Mark Van Streefkerk


This year’s Seattle Asian American Film Festival (SAAFF) will take place online, and feature more short- and feature-length films, documentaries, and animated films than ever before in the festival’s history. Streaming with the help of partner Northwest Film Forum from March 4 to 14, SAAFF will virtually screen 123 films by or about Asian Americans in the U.S., grouped into 15 programs, and will hold one drive-in movie event.

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Rad Pacific Northwest Women and Femmes, Part 1

by Larissa McCartney


In 2020, I attempted to participate in the Instagram #100Days challenge where artists and creatives pick one theme and medium to practice for 100 days. My goal was to digitally illustrate 100 badass women and femmes of the Pacific Northwest, from all walks of life and different professions, who inspired me for a number of different reasons. I didn’t quite make it to 100, but in the end that didn’t matter! Nominations from friends, co-workers, and people on Instagram helped curate a long list of incredible individuals who contribute to and represent the PNW, influencing this great place we call home. Below are a selection of a few of these phenomenal local people along with my illustrations.

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POETRY: Revolutionary Encounters

by Evelyn Chow


Free Write: “If the revolution will not be televised, where will it be seen?” (thank you Nikkita for the prompt) 

You will not find the revolution posted in the window of the fancy new coffee shop down the block 

Or at the ginger beer store run by the white lady with dreadlocks 

The revolution will not have private security or no-trespassing signs 

You will not simply put a #BlackLivesMatter banner in your driveway, window, or storefront because 

The revolution will not be gentrified 

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Artist Roger Shimomura’s 100 ‘Little White Lies’

by Susan Kunimatsu

(This article previously appeared on the International Examiner and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


Like most of us, Roger Shimomura has spent the last 10 months in isolation; in his case, his home and studio in Lawrence, Kansas. For Shimomura, the pandemic has been an intellectually fertile, artistically prolific period. The result, 100 ”Little White Lies” is now on view at Greg Kucera Gallery. The 100 untitled paintings, each a 12 by 12-inch square, are numbered in the order in which they were created starting in late 2019. Hung in a single row that wraps around two galleries, they do not form a narrative. They are a stream of consciousness, a visual record of the ideas that occupied the artist during this strange year.

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Pongo Poetry: My Heart is No Longer…


Pongo Poetry Project’s mission is to engage youth in poetry writing to inspire healing from trauma. For over 20 years, Pongo has mentored poetry with children at the Child Study Treatment Center (CSTC), the only state-run psychiatric hospital for youth in Washington State. Many CSTC youth are coping with severe emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Approximately 40% of youth arrive at CSTC having been court ordered to get treatment; however, by the end of their stay, most youth residents become voluntary participants. Pongo believes there is power in creative expression, and articulating one’s pain to an empathetic audience. Through this special monthly column in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald, Pongo invites readers to bear witness to the pain, resilience, and creative capacity of youth whose voices and perspectives are too often relegated to the periphery.

Continue reading Pongo Poetry: My Heart is No Longer…

16th Annual Children’s Film Festival Seattle Brings ‘Love and Light’ to Virtual Audiences

by Mark Van Streefkerk 

The Children’s Film Festival Seattle (CFFS) returns for its 16th year with a theme of comfort and hope as we enter the second year of a global pandemic. Presented by Northwest Film Forum (NWFF) February 18–28, the online streaming festival includes 133 live-action and animated films from 36 countries, many of which were made during lockdown. With four feature films and 16 short film programs, the festival intends to uplift and comfort children and their families by inspiring empathy, understanding, and a nuanced view of the world. 

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