Category Archives: Civics

Why the Port of Seattle Can’t Get Contracting Right

by Hanna Brooks Olsen

I-200, which passed 19 years ago, has made it nearly impossible to correct decades of discriminatory contracting processed—but that’s not the only reason

In late 2007, an audit of the Port of Seattle found numerous glaring issues, including the squandering of close to $100M. The report, which ultimately lead to the departure of two high-ranking officials and a criminal investigation, also found something else: Port leadership, it alleged, may have been exploiting loopholes in the rules around contracting to steer lucrative deals away from small businesses who had taken part in the bidding process and instead toward preferred providers. Continue reading Why the Port of Seattle Can’t Get Contracting Right

Pat Murakami Talks Housing, Taxes and Social Justice

by Will Sweger 

In an unexpected move, the Seattle Times Editorial Board recently published an endorsement of Pat Murakami, a South Seattle small business owner running for the Seattle’s Ninth City Council Seat against incumbent M. Lorena González. The South Seattle Emerald took a moment to ask Murakami for additional detail on her stances. Continue reading Pat Murakami Talks Housing, Taxes and Social Justice

King County Metro Access Slammed By Audit, Claims of Poor Service

by Kelsey Hamlin

Going out on a limb, parent Becky Bisbee, decided one day to use Access, a $61 million ADA transit program under King County Metro. Her non-verbal and physically disabled daughter was supposed to attend a day camp sponsored by Seattle Parks and Recreation but Bisbee couldn’t get her there. At noon, someone from the day camp called asking if the young girl was coming. This was three hours after Bisbee’s daughter first journeyed to catch the Access van. Continue reading King County Metro Access Slammed By Audit, Claims of Poor Service

Seattle Council Approves Bias-Free Policing Bill

by Sharayah Lane

Seattle City Council continued its efforts toward police reform on Monday, unanimously passing bias-free policing legislation.

The council bill comes one year after Councilmember Bruce Harrell proposed drafting legislation that would clearly lay out SPD policies on bias-free policing and develop a private right of action for victims of law enforcement discrimination. Continue reading Seattle Council Approves Bias-Free Policing Bill

Want to Run For Port Commission? Expect to Get Paid Peanuts

by Hanna Brooks Olsen

The Port of Seattle is known for having good jobs—the kind of good jobs that lawmakers promise to bring back to communities. The kind of good jobs that communities are built on. An engineer for the Port can expect to earn six figures. An analyst might earn just under that amount. Even the interns are compensated fairly well, considering their work is part-time. Continue reading Want to Run For Port Commission? Expect to Get Paid Peanuts

Emerald Readers Give Their Picks For Mayor

With ballots dropping soon we asked Emerald readers and contributors to give us their reason for backing their preferred mayoral candidate.

 

Laura Loe, Voting for Cary Moon

Cary Moon has been a mentor to me for the last few years. When my fellow members elected me to the Executive Committee of Sierra Club Washington State Chapter, I expressed concerns about how historically white-led environmental movements had long harmed communities of color. Moon recommended an upcoming anti-racism workshop “Exploring Race & Class Intersections” that had helped her to begin to recognize her power and privilege. As the City of Seattle’s next Mayor, Cary Moon will confront institutional racism and systemic oppression within city government while doing the important work to find holistic solutions to Seattle’s housing crisis. It is not an accident my second choice for mayor, Nikkita Oliver, often cites Cary Moon as someone she admires in this complex mayoral landscape. Continue reading Emerald Readers Give Their Picks For Mayor

Seattle Council Unanimously Votes to Tax the Rich, But the Legal Fight is Just Beginning

by Sharayah Lane

Monday’s Seattle City Council meeting ended in a long, joyful standing ovation as the council unanimously voted to tax the city’s high income earners making way for the first progressive tax in recent year. The vote also set the stage for the looming legal battle needed to turn the bill into a reality. Continue reading Seattle Council Unanimously Votes to Tax the Rich, But the Legal Fight is Just Beginning