Category Archives: Community

Somali Health Board Hosts Eighth-Annual Health Fair

by Amina Ibrahim


This week, Somali Health Board (SHB) is hosting their eighth-annual health fair. This year’s health fair will continue through next week expanding from the usual one-day event in past years. 

Starting on August 12, the health fair will provide walk-up COVID-19 testing sites in three South Seattle neighborhoods: New Holly, Highpoint, and Yesler. SHB is partnering with Seattle Housing Authority, Neighborhood House, and Neighborcare Health, which is providing the COVID-19 testing. 

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Photo Essay: Second Annual Afro Bite in Skyway

by Susan Fried (words and photos)


Hundreds of people gathered in the parking lot of Catfish Corner Express in Skyway on Saturday, Aug. 9 for the Second Annual Afro Bite. Attendees sampled food from an assortment of Black-owned restaurants including the Mac Shack, Elotes Custom Corn, Heaven’s Kitchen, and of course, Seattle’s famous Catfish Corner. In addition to food, several Black-owned businesses also sold apparel, skin products, jewelry, books, and face masks. Continue reading Photo Essay: Second Annual Afro Bite in Skyway

Photo Essay: Seattle’s Movement for Black Lives

by Tiametta Zoe (words and photos)


I won’t say too much about this photo essay because the photos speak for themselves. I will say that it came from the lens and eyes of a Black woman.

I have always dealt with debilitatingly low self-esteem and a deteriorating self-concept. This has often left me vulnerable to abuse, manipulation, and near-death experiences. Understanding the concept of my beauty and my essence has always been a struggle for me, mainly due to the way society has viewed and treated Black people in general and the traumatic history both my people and I have inherited. This is all being brought to the surface now like never before. I consider myself to be in recovery — learning the concepts of truth, self-love, assertiveness, courage, intuition, and progress. Continue reading Photo Essay: Seattle’s Movement for Black Lives

Photo Essay: Abridged 2020 Umoja Fest Celebrates Black Life

by Susan Fried


Umoja Fest African Heritage Festival & Parade is one of the summer highlights of Seattle’s Central District. The festival, formerly known as the East Madison Mardi Gras and the Pacific Northwest Community Festival, has been an annual tradition uplifting Black Americans in the region for over six decades. Continue reading Photo Essay: Abridged 2020 Umoja Fest Celebrates Black Life

Rally Demands Funding for Anti-Racist Community Based Schooling

by M. Anthony Davis


About 200 people gathered in the Rainier Beach Community Center Plaza Friday afternoon for the Black Education Now Rally. Coordinated by Garfield High School teacher Jesse Hagopian and local activist and parent Emijah Smith, in collaboration with King County Equity Now and Decriminalize Seattle, the rally partnered with local youth to demand funding for community-based schooling with an anti-racist approach to education. Continue reading Rally Demands Funding for Anti-Racist Community Based Schooling

Renton Residents For Change Seeks City’s Active Commitment to Anti-Racism

by Carolyn Bick


Joseph Todd has been pulled over six times in as many months this year. Every time he’s pulled over, he says, the law enforcement officer inevitably asks the same question.

“He pulls me over, pulls me to the side, and the first thing out of his mouth is, ‘Is this your car?’ And my answer, once again [is], ‘Yeah, it is,’” Todd recalled, describing his most recent interaction with a state trooper.

Todd, a Black man, is the City of Tukwila’s Chief Information Officer, but he lives in Renton. Todd said he doesn’t speed, and he certainly wasn’t guilty of what the officer accused him of doing most recently: driving without a seat belt on.

“[After he pulled me over,] I took my seat belt off so I could reach over and get my registration and everything out of the glove compartment, and then he proceeds to tell me he saw my seat belt flapping in the wind,” Todd said. “In my car, if my seat belt isn’t on, it pulls itself back into the wall of the vehicle.”

Continue reading Renton Residents For Change Seeks City’s Active Commitment to Anti-Racism

South Seattle Shop Denied CARES Loan Fosters Anti-Stress Expertise

by Ashley Archibald

(This article was originally published by Real Change and has been reprinted under an agreement.) 


The line to enter the Columbia City Farmers Market stretched down 35th Avenue South, curving down South Ferdinand Street, shoppers standing the designated six feet apart in the shade of the trees of the shuttered Interagency Academy. Vendors stacked fresh vegetables and prepared food on tables that lined each side of South Edmunds Street, tokens of normalcy in abnormal times.

A customer goes shopping at QueenCare on a sunny Wednesday afternoon amid Seattle’s Columbia City Farmers Market. The shop’s owner is promoting self-care, especially for Black people, in a difficult time. (Photo: Susan Fried)

Just a block away, Monika Mathews had a small table of her own set up in front of QueenCare, the natural skincare company that she launched in December 2018. Colorful face masks and dangling earrings next to Black Lives Matter shirts and a handful of her handmade products lay out to tempt customers, as a person filled bottles with handmade products inside the small storefront.

There’s a lot of work to keep up with.

Continue reading South Seattle Shop Denied CARES Loan Fosters Anti-Stress Expertise

Skyway’s Barbershop Row Returns, in Limited Form, Adjusting to Coronavirus Restrictions

by M. Anthony Davis


Barbershops and beauty salons are more than just local businesses in Black communities. They represent safe spaces for communal gatherings and often serve as a hub for civic discourse, playing host to important cultural dialogue and connection. I vividly remember my early hair cut days, sitting in Greg’s chair — Greg was one of my first barbers — getting a skin-tight fade way back in 1996, as he explained to me in detail how the SuperSonics could beat Jordan’s Bulls and become NBA Champions. The barbershop is the one of the first places you’ll hear complex debates over sports, politics, religion, relationships, and everything in between. It’s also one of the few public spaces in a city with demographics like Seattle’s, where members of the Black community can have these debates without being under the microscope of whiteness. 

Continue reading Skyway’s Barbershop Row Returns, in Limited Form, Adjusting to Coronavirus Restrictions

Young Latinx Raise $5.2 Million in COVID Relief for Undocumented People Shunned By Government

by Sharon H. Chang

It has been six months of an escalating US coronavirus outbreak which began in Washington State. During this chaotic time, when many government leaders and Americans have shown more interest in protecting personal politics than actual human lives, it has been confusing and hard for Washington’s most impacted communities to navigate safety and wellness. But one thing has been made abundantly clear to undocumented people in the state who are among the hardest hit by coronavirus — if they don’t take care of each other, no one will. This is why the Washington Dream Coalition did not wait to take action and has raised millions of dollars in COVID-19 relief funds for their community since March. Continue reading Young Latinx Raise $5.2 Million in COVID Relief for Undocumented People Shunned By Government