Category Archives: Community

Juneteenth 2020 in Seattle — A Guide to Local Events

by Emerald Staff


The Emerald rounded up local Juneteenth events so you and yours can easily find ways to participate both in person and virtually in celebrations, marches, live streams, talks, activities for children, and more!
Juneteenth flag (this version by Mike Tré), licensed by Creative Commons, Wikimedia Commons author: Saturnsorbit.

Juneteenth—Fri., June 19:

Juneteenth Blackout at the CHOP

“We’re blacking out CHOP … the viral death of black bodies was the catalyst for this current movement and we need to make sure we remain focused. This means both policy and systemic change to our systems and healing space for black people.

“So that’s exactly what we’re creating. A series of events in which we center black healing and community.

“What we need from our non-black allies are donations of money and supplies and the willingness to support by quietly protecting sacred space for black healing. We need allies on the outskirts who are willing to be a physical barrier of protection and to peacefully deter potential interruptions.” Read full schedule of events in Facebook event details.

Donations of supplies, funds, and volunteer bodies on the ground at the event are requested from the organizers. Read event details for more on this and donate funds here.

Time: 8 a.m.–8 p.m.
Where: CHOP — 1635 11th Ave (Cal Anderson Park)
Cost: Free to attend

Continue reading Juneteenth 2020 in Seattle — A Guide to Local Events

Short Film “Being Black in America” Is A Rallying Cry To Black Youth

by Mark Van Streefkerk


“Being Black in America” is a short film based on a poem by 14-year-old Lincoln Wilmore. Originally written last year, the poem counters racist stereotypes with positive affirmations and messages for Black youth, ending on a revolutionary high note with footage from the We Want To Live rally on June 7. Continue reading Short Film “Being Black in America” Is A Rallying Cry To Black Youth

Seattle Children’s March Evokes Legacy of Civil Rights Movement Youth

by Sharon H. Chang


“When I say Black Lives, you say Matter. Black Lives–” “Matter!” “Black Lives–” “Matter!” Three thousand children and adults gathered at Garfield High School’s playfield on Saturday afternoon for the Seattle Children’s March to demand an end to police brutality, anti-Blackness, and systemic racism. The playfield was filled with children ranging in age from toddlers and preschoolers to tweens and teens. The march was organized by a committee of Black youth and child leaders with the support of adult educators, parents, and artists. Continue reading Seattle Children’s March Evokes Legacy of Civil Rights Movement Youth

Northwest Tap Connection Raising $75,000 to Survive the COVID-19 Pandemic

by Shann Thomas


Outside of the Northwest Tap Connection studio a vibrant mural by Lawrence Pitre stands tall with an Alice Walker quote smack in the center: “Furious Times Require Furious Dancing.”

For now, however, dancing inside of Northwest Tap has come to a screeching halt. Like many small businesses, the impact of COVID 19 has temporarily shut the doors of Northwest Tap. Continue reading Northwest Tap Connection Raising $75,000 to Survive the COVID-19 Pandemic

Hot Dogs and Booze — Lottie’s Lemonade Stand Serves as Columbia City’s “Speakeasy”

by Mark Van Streefkerk 


Lottie’s Lounge, known as “Columbia City’s Living Room,” is back in limited service with a new, outdoor lemonade stand. Located on the patio, Lottie’s Lemonade Stand sells hot dogs, vegan Field Roast dogs, hot links, bratwurst, popcorn, slushies, iced tea, and of course, fresh-made lemonade. They also sell takeout beer and wine, and their in-house made drinks come with the option of adding alcohol. As one of their recent Instagram posts stated, they serve both lemonade and “lemonade.” 

Continue reading Hot Dogs and Booze — Lottie’s Lemonade Stand Serves as Columbia City’s “Speakeasy”

Challenges Faced by Black Entrepreneurs Exacerbated by COVID-19, Civil Unrest

by Alexa Peters 


Late this April, in the thick of the economic crisis created by COVID-19, CBS News spoke to Ashley Harrington, the Federal Advocacy Director and Senior Counsel for the Center for Responsible Lending, a nonprofit group that fights unfair lending practices. Asked for her assessment of the Federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), Harrington shared that hardly any Black-owned business would have access to financial support.

“Based on how the program is structured, we estimate that upwards of 90% of businesses owned by people of color have been, or will likely be, shut out of the Paycheck Protection Program,” Harrington said.

Continue reading Challenges Faced by Black Entrepreneurs Exacerbated by COVID-19, Civil Unrest

“We Want to Live” Rally Draws Thousands in Support of Black Youth in South Seattle

by Ronnie Estoque


No one within a mile of Othello Park Sunday afternoon could avoid the message. The crowd was too massive, the signs too numerous and the uniform chant, Black Lives Matter, was too loud. Continue reading “We Want to Live” Rally Draws Thousands in Support of Black Youth in South Seattle

Hundreds of Families Hold Black Lives Matter Vigil at Leschi Elementary

by Sharon H. Chang


Hundreds of families turned out for a moving Black Lives Matter vigil at Leschi Elementary Friday afternoon to remember George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and so many other Black lives lost to police violence. Families came not only from Leschi Elementary, but also Bailey Gatzert Elementary, Thurgood Marshall Elementary, Meany Middle School and Washington Middle School. Parents and children filled the schoolyard, holding protest signs while wearing black clothing. Others, who needed more social distance, stood by the fence or sat in cars parked all along Spruce Street. Continue reading Hundreds of Families Hold Black Lives Matter Vigil at Leschi Elementary

“For A Greater Purpose”: Community Aids in Clean-Up, Pushes Back Against National Narratives About Previous Day’s Protests

by Carolyn Bick


The Emerald wanted to show the community taking care of each other the day after a peaceful demonstration against systemic racism in the nation’s police force was hijacked by, from many accounts of protestors on the ground, white people who attended with the aim of causing destruction. Mayor Jenny Durkan also acknowledged in a statement on Twitter that “much of the violence and destruction, both here and across the country, has been instigated and perpetuated by white men.” 

Not all the people interviewed here were at the protests, but all came out specifically to help their community. The Emerald wanted to capture the range of thoughts and feelings among these people. They are couples with children and without; community organizers and everyday citizens trying to do their part; demonstrators who said they watched up close as police officers incited violence at the previous day’s protest; and people who did not attend the protest, but felt they had to come down, because doing something was better than sitting with their anxiety at home.

Continue reading “For A Greater Purpose”: Community Aids in Clean-Up, Pushes Back Against National Narratives About Previous Day’s Protests