Category Archives: Community

Converge Media’s Omari Salisbury in Conversation with KING 5’s Joyce Taylor This Saturday

by M. Anthony Davis


After his coverage of protests against police brutality this summer, Omari Salisbury has become one of the most prominent names in local media. Salisbury, along with the media company he founded, Converge Media, has been thrust into local and national attention for being on the front lines of protest and for streaming powerful images of tear gas and civil unrest directly into living rooms and on to the devices of spectators and concerned citizens in our region and across the country. 

But, Salisbury is more than a “citizen journalist,” as he’s often referred to in media reports. He is more than just a guy with a red iPhone streaming live protest footage to thousands of viewers — which, in and of itself, is arguably a major achievement. Salisbury is an accomplished journalist with a career that spans decades. That career started at Garfield High School writing for the school paper and eventually led to him working in media across the globe. 

Continue reading Converge Media’s Omari Salisbury in Conversation with KING 5’s Joyce Taylor This Saturday

Shelter Fest: An Online Music Festival Celebrating Black Artists and Local Restaurants

by M. Anthony Davis


Fall is here. And with it comes rain, gloom, and days that turn to night in the blink of an eye, as well as a never-ending news cycle that circulates between Trump administration shenanigans (so glad he’s almost gone!) to constant reminders that not only is COVID still a problem, but numbers across the country — including King County —are higher than ever. You know what would be amazing right now? A free music festival!

And lucky for us, Bad Habit Media has announced Shelter Fest, a new online music festival created in response to the shelter-in-place mandate and how it has disproportionately impacted the arts and service industries, as well as communities of color. All day this weekend, Saturday November 14 and Sunday November 15, Shelter Fest will provide direct support to local artists, businesses, and restaurants by fostering a creatively designed music festival that is both socially distant and surprisingly intimate. 

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How Seattle Therapists Make Space for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color

by Suhani Dalal


Since the start of the global pandemic, one Seattle therapist said that roughly 90% of her new clients are Black, Indigenous, or People of Color (BIPOC), compared to before, when about 70% were white. 

“There are so many people coming into therapy for their first time — first in their family, first in their history,” said Asian American psychotherapist and codependency therapist Ivy Kwong. “I always tell them: ‘I’m so grateful you’re doing this work, it’s not easy, but it’s the most important work I believe you can do in this lifetime. The work you are doing [honors] your entire lineage because it will heal past and future generations.’” 

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Photo Essay: T’Challaween, Some Much-Needed South End Sunshine and Sweetness

by Emerald Staff


This Halloween, the South End changed things up — though it’s probably more fair to say that a really weird year did that for us and we just got creative with the tools we had at our disposal. T’Challaween was something else! We had a blast putting it on. We hope everyone enjoyed the day as much as we did!  

We, the South Seattle Emerald, our exclusive broadcast partner, Rainier Avenue Radio, a stellar list of sponsors (which we’ll get to in a minute), and a dedicated group of volunteers laid the groundwork for the festivities — and the South Seattle community brought the party! (We knew you would, but we were overwhelmed by the turn out. Literally — we ran out of candy!) 

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Intentionalist: Vote With Your Wallet

by Laura Clise

Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters


When it comes to the money we spend, we live in a time when we can swipe and click our way to immediate gratification, oftentimes unknowingly to the detriment of the social, economic, and cultural fabric of our communities. Consider, for instance, “free” delivery. The fees charged by venture-backed technology platforms actually cut into or overwhelm small businesses’ already slim margins. In their effort to maximize ordering efficiency, these digital platforms make it easy for us to forget that the livelihoods of business owners and their families depend on each order.

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Coyote Central’s Voting Swag Raises Awareness for Youth-Led VOTE Project

by Mark Van Streefkerk 

Members of Coyote Central’s Youth Advisory Board (YAB) prove it’s never too early for young people to talk about voting. YAB’s VOTE Project is a youth-led voting awareness initiative and Instagram platform for youth speakers to share their reasons for voting. If unable to vote, they talk about why the election matters to them and encourage others to get involved. In addition to their Instagram account, YAB has released pins, stickers, magnets, and posters to encourage voting, the sales of which provide small stipends to youth speakers and support YAB. 

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From High School Basketball Star to Rapper, Isiah Brown — AKA Zay Wonder — Has a Unique Storyline to Spin

by M. Anthony Davis

Many of us may be familiar with Isiah Brown from his days playing basketball at Lakeside High School. In 2016, during Brown’s senior year, he became the Metro League all-time scoring leader. In that same year he averaged 33 points per game, was named Gatorade Player of the Year in the state of Washington, was the News Tribune Player of the Year, the Associated Press Class 3A Player of the Year, and the recipient of a number of additional awards that I won’t list here. But here is something about Brown that you probably didn’t know: He is one of the most talented rappers in our city, and he’s been working on his craft under the radar for about five years now. 

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T’Challaween — A South End Tribute to Our Heroes & Role Models

by Emerald Staff


On Saturday, October 31, 2020, the South Seattle Emerald in partnership with Rainier Avenue Radio will bring you — T’Challaween!

“We will work to be an example of how we, as brothers and sisters on this earth, should treat each other. Now, more than ever, the illusions of division threaten our very existence. We all know the truth: more connects us than separates us. But in times of crisis the wise build bridges, while the foolish build barriers. We must find a way to look after one another, as if we were one single tribe.”

T’Challa, The Black Panther

A socially distant, COVID-safe costume parade and contest

The event — the first of its kind — will feature a 3/4-mile, socially distant, COVID-safe costume parade along the Beacon Hill Greenway. Paraders will travel north to south from around South College Street to South Hanford Street along 18th Avenue South (see map below in event poster image).

“No-touch” candy tossers will be stationed along the route and event ambassadors will help guide paraders and direct traffic, as the Beacon Hill Greenway — while meant for walking and rolling along, as part of Seattle’s Stay Healthy Streets initiative — will not be officially closed (only local access is permitted).

We ask that all parade participants and spectators maintain a minimum of six feet of distance from other attendees. Please attend T’Challaween only with your family/household to avoid coming into contact with people outside of your quarantine “pod.” And AT ALL TIMES, masks must be worn. If your costume has a mask, wear an appropriate mask over/under it (costume masks are not sufficient protection for yourself or others from COVID-19).

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Rahwa Habte Memorial March to the Ballot Box

by Susan Fried


Sounds of cheering rose from the crowd as people lined up to drop their ballots into the ballot box by Garfield Community Center on Saturday, October 24. A group of about 100 people had marched from Pratt Fine Arts Center near 20th and Jackson to the ballot box on 23rd and Cherry to honor the memory of Rahwa Habte, a community organizer and a fierce advocate of voter rights.  

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Community Comes Together to Save The Station

by Marti McKenna


When Luis Rodriguez and Leona Moore-Rodriguez put out a call for help on Oct. 13, they knew their community would answer that call. But they couldn’t have imagined all the ways their neighbors would rise to the occasion. A few days later, the GoFundMe a friend and customer set up for them has raised over $25,000, and members of the community have found a host of creative ways to help keep their favorite coffee shop from closing.

It wasn’t easy for Luis and Leona to ask for the help they needed. “For me it was humbling, a little embarrassing,” Luis told the Emerald. “To have to ask to your community like, ‘Yo, we’re struggling, we’re going through some rough times, we need your help, we need your money, we need people to donate …’” 

“It was a little hard to ask for help,” Leona agreed, “but at the same time, I know we have a beautiful community that’s willing to stick their necks out and help those in need. And we just happen to be one of those businesses, like so many other businesses in Seattle, struggling through COVID.”

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