Category Archives: Essay

Microaggressions: When to Uphold Our Individuality

by Jasmine Louie  

A rocky journey to finding out whether others were inflicting pain through their remarks, and how I dealt with it.

It’s Probably My Fault

Never having learned the definition of microaggressions, I was never the type of person who could point them out with ease. I would assume people had good intentions and that I misinterpreted the situation. Somehow, I was always in the wrong for assuming the worst in others. Beginning to understand the meaning behind microaggressions, I was suddenly reacquainted with every insensitive remark once directed towards me. The word had implanted itself in my mind and I became exceedingly wary of my surroundings. Every remark now had the potential to be classified as a microaggression, and it was up to me to reach a verdict. Continue reading Microaggressions: When to Uphold Our Individuality

With Her, For Her: Reflections From a New Parent

by Zoe True

We all have priorities that pull us away from civic life. Paradoxically, it is often these very same priorities that drive us to get involved in our communities in the first place. This was certainly the case for me. My transition into parenthood in 2017 was especially emotional thanks to our country’s turmoil. But looking to 2018, and the role each of us can play, gives me hope. Continue reading With Her, For Her: Reflections From a New Parent

Brad and Becky From Bellevue Are Coming to Rainier Beach

by Reagan Jackson

Six years ago I bought a house in Rainier Beach.

As a single person living on a non-profit salary, homeownership in Seattle seemed an impossible dream. With rents steadily rising, I went through the motions of finding a realtor and getting prequalified for a home loan anyway, just in case I got lucky and could lock in a place to live at a fixed rate. Continue reading Brad and Becky From Bellevue Are Coming to Rainier Beach

Epiphanies of Blackness: An Unspoken Rite of Passage

by ChrisTiana ObeySumner

A seemingly consistent rite of passage across the lived experience of Black Americans is the moment where one realizes that: 1) they are Black, and; 2) being Black is a problem.

My first mini-rite of passage was in kindergarten. I was born in Anchorage, Alaska, and went to a predominantly White elementary school. I was twirling in my classroom with other girls during a play break, and noticed the other girls’ hair was whipping across the faces of the others. Of course, I did not think anything of the fact that my hair was doing the same. Continue reading Epiphanies of Blackness: An Unspoken Rite of Passage

The Silence Here is Deafening – And It Kills

by Ohenewaa Nkrumah

On one of my last days at the University of Washington School of Medicine (UW SOM) before I took a leave of absence that was prompted by one racially violent incident after the other, I sat in class fighting back tears of frustration, humiliation, and anger. As a Black queer non-binary student studying in a predominantly white medical school where racism is prevalent, these emotions were familiar guests of mine. Continue reading The Silence Here is Deafening – And It Kills

To All Good Men: You Must Be Braver

October 18th – 26th is the Emerald’s Rainmaker Membership Drive! In order to continue producing the Emerald, we need 500 new donors at an average donation of $12/month. Will you join us? 

Rainmaker-Web-Ad-Any-Page


by Danica Bornstein

Note: This article contains information about sexual assault and/or violence which may be triggering to survivors. 

Reading all the recent accounts of sexual harassment and assault, I’ve been remembering what it was like to experience sexism as a very, very young woman. Continue reading To All Good Men: You Must Be Braver