Category Archives: Features

Weekend Long Reads: What Is The Sentinel Event Review?

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s “long read” is about a new report from Seattle’s Office of the Inspector General for Public Safety (OIG) on its investigation into last summer’s protests using a process called a “Sentinel Event Review.”

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What Would Ranked Choice Voting Look Like in King County?

by Ashley Archibald


The King County Council curtailed an effort July 12 to put a new form of voting before the electorate in November, citing a desire for more time to work through the details before presenting the option to voters.

The original legislation — sponsored by Councilmember Girmay Zahilay — would have given voters the option to approve ranked-choice voting (RCV) for certain nonpartisan County positions including the executive, assessor, director of elections, prosecuting attorney, and County Council.

Had the legislation gone forward and been approved by voters, the new system wouldn’t have taken effect until the Council hammered out the details and voted on a series of protocols, staff said at the July 7 Committee of the Whole. But after initially advancing the matter to its July 13 Council meeting, the Council decided to put the legislation on hold. 

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At Wasat, Muslim American Community Can Be Together — Beautifully

by Kamna Shastri


When the Islamic School of Seattle closed in 2012, the children and parents who were part of the local Muslim institution’s community did not want to lose the spirit of the school. Wasat emerged from this gap, fulfilling a need for former Islamic School of Seattle parents and students to stay connected around shared values and exploration of the Islamic faith. What started with informal meals and community Iftar dinners during the month of Ramadan eventually became a robust and cross-cultural space called Wasat.

In Arabic, “Wasat” means “middle-way.” According to Executive Director Baraka Blue, it is the principle that guides a just and balanced community. Wasat is a community of —but not limited to — the Muslim faith and is dedicated to being a space where members can bring their whole selves and engage with the Islamic faith across the many different cultures that Wasat members come from.

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Weekend Long Reads: The Cost of ‘Compassion’

by Kevin Schofield


Two “long read” documents came through my inbox in the past week that, upon reflection, are likely to set the tone for a good chunk of our political conversation over the next few months as we head into the primary and general elections here in Seattle.

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New Signage Final Step in Preserving Legacy of Licton Springs as Indigenous Landmark

by Alexa Peters


Nearly two years since earning a cultural landmark designation from the City of Seattle, Licton Springs Park, known as líq’tәd (pronounced LEE’kteed) in the Lushootseed language of the Coast Salish people, will have new signage installed on July 14 that will explain the cultural significance of this North Seattle site, in particular its ochre-colored spring, to the region’s history and Indigenous community.

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For the Love of Dogs and Baseball: J.P. Crawford Pitches Sandwiches for Charity

by M. Anthony Davis


Seattle Mariners star shortstop, J.P. Crawford, is teaming up with local bagel shop Blazing Bagels to create a custom sandwich. The partnership also combines his love for animals and giving back to the community.

Named after Crawford, the new sandwich, the CrawDADDY, will include turkey, bacon, and salami, with a chive smear inside of an everything bagel. 

“The sandwich is fire!” Crawford tells me. “I already tried it. It has everything I love, and it slaps!”

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The Demographics Behind Biden’s Victory

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s “long read” is a deep dive into the demographics of the voters in last November’s presidential election. It would be wonderful if we knew more immediately after the election about who chose to vote (or stay home), but our secret balloting process means that demographic data must be reconstructed after the fact. And that process often takes months.

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UTOPIA Provides Resources, Cultural Empowerment for Queer & Trans Pacific Islanders

by Kamna Shastri


When Taffy Johnson moved to Seattle from San Francisco in 2006, she felt alone and isolated. As a Queer Trans Pacific Islander (QTPI), there were no community organizations or gathering spaces where she could share experiences and access support with other LGBTQ Pacific Islanders. In San Francisco, Johnson had been part of a flagship organization called United Territories of Pacific Islanders Alliance (UTOPIA). The space had given her a glimpse of the building blocks needed to create something similar elsewhere.

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PHOTO ESSAY: First Weekend of ‘Reopening’ in South Seattle

by Susan Fried


The Fourth of July weekend was also the first official weekend that King County dropped all COVID-19 restrictions, and many people in South Seattle were excited to finally go to their favorite places, sit down across from friends and family, and take their masks off (as long as they’d been vaccinated). 

Individual businesses could ask customers to wear masks, but many allowed those who had been vaccinated to go mask free, trusting them to be honest about whether they’d been vaccinated or not. Some businesses chose to ask patrons to continue wearing masks while others opted to not fully open.

For many South End residents, things almost felt like they were back to a pre-pandemic normal.  

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‘Eco Blocks’ Are Concrete Signs of Seattle’s Failure to Address RV Homelessness

by Erica C. Barnett

(This article was originally published by PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement).


Drive through Seattle’s industrial areas — Georgetown, South Park, parts of Ballard, and SoDo — and it’s hard to miss them: Bulky, horizontal concrete blocks lined up like giant Legos along the sides of the street, preventing large vehicles from parking by the roadside.

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