Category Archives: Feature

As Holidays Approach, So Do Food Insecurity Concerns

by Elizabeth Turnbull


As the food-centric holidays of Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s Day approach, many Seattlietes are confronted with maintaining financial and food security amid the new lockdown and further deliberations over future federal aid.

Various food banks in South Seattle have seen an increased need for food in the community from the beginning of the pandemic response in the spring. As happens every year around this time, this need has become even greater in preparation for the holidays.

Continue reading As Holidays Approach, So Do Food Insecurity Concerns

Weekend Reads: Washington’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan

by Kevin Schofield


COVID-19 is on everyone’s mind right now, so this week we’re going to have one very long read and one very short one on two topics related to the virus. First, with all the good news about vaccines this week, it’s time to take a look at Washington State’s plan for distributing and prioritizing doses. Second, we’re going to see what the latest thinking is about COVID hazards while flying.

Continue reading Weekend Reads: Washington’s COVID-19 Vaccination Plan

Shawn Kemp’s 5% Stake in Shawn Kemp Cannabis Highlights How Far Seattle Is from an “Equitable Industry”

by Luna Reyna


Last month cannabis media was enthusiastically reporting about the first Black-owned cannabis dispensary in Seattle, owned by one of Seattle’s heroes: Shawn Kemp, also known as the Reign Man, a six-time NBA All-Star and former Seattle SuperSonics Power Forward. The rub is that at the time of this announcement Kemp had no stake in the company that bears his name. Matt Schoenlein and Ramsey Hamide — two co-founders of Main Street Marijuana — owned the dispensary. A dispensary named Shawn Kemp Cannabis.

Unfortunately for Schoenlein and Hamide, activists and hopeful Black cannabis entrepreneurs who have been shut out of the business quickly called their bluff, revealing that Kemp’s application to join the existing license had not yet been approved and he would ultimately only have a 5% stake in the company. This hardly qualifies as “Black-owned.” “It was a blatant attempt to manipulate the public,” says Aaron Barfield, president of Black Excellence in Cannabis (BEC). A BEC press release called the claim that the dispensary was Black-owned “ethically reprehensible,” considering there are 50 cannabis dispensaries in Seattle and not one of them is Black-owned. But that is not for lack of trying.

Continue reading Shawn Kemp’s 5% Stake in Shawn Kemp Cannabis Highlights How Far Seattle Is from an “Equitable Industry”

Weekend Reads: Surveying Seattle Voters on Policing and Homelessness

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s “long reads” include a close look at a local political survey; the Washington State Health Department’s biweekly status update on the spread of COVID-19 in the state; and a guide to how Seattle’s foray into participatory budgeting might take shape.

Continue reading Weekend Reads: Surveying Seattle Voters on Policing and Homelessness

An Abolitionist in Olympia: How Kirsten Harris-Talley Became the 37th District’s New Legislator

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Representing the 37th district position 2, newly elected Kirsten Harris-Talley built her campaign and platform by organizing with her neighbors. In fact, she ran for office because members of the community asked her to. The first out, Black, queer femme to serve in the Washington State Legislature, Harris-Talley has spent the last 20 years building movements for progressive change. She was a founding board member at SURGE Reproductive Justice, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Washington, and former program director of Progress Alliance of Washington, as well as being involved in grassroots movements like No New Youth Jail. In 2017, she was the second Black woman ever to serve on the Seattle City Council, where she introduced the first version of JumpStart Seattle, a progressive revenue measure that passed this year to help fund COVID-19 recovery.  

Now that she’s on her way to Olympia, Harris-Talley pledges to be transparent about policies and decisions that affect people in the 37th district through a future podcast, accountability council, and other tools. Her work is informed by aunties and elders in the community, as well as youth-led activism in the South End, where she has lived with her husband and family in Hillman City since 2004. “I’m going to be organizing with my neighbors. It’s the only way we can win,” she said. “Because I think politics is an organizing game. I don’t think it’s an ideas game — it’s an organizing game.”

Continue reading An Abolitionist in Olympia: How Kirsten Harris-Talley Became the 37th District’s New Legislator

Weekend Reads: How Will Puget Sound Grow?

by Kevin Schofield


This weekend’s long reads, guaranteed to be election-free, include a look at the growth plans for the Puget Sound Regional Council; how different age groups are (or are not) trying to stop the spread of COVID-19; and progress in understanding whether we are alone in the universe.

Continue reading Weekend Reads: How Will Puget Sound Grow?

‘Hatemonger’ Examines Stephen Miller, the Extremist at the Heart of Trump’s White House

by Chetanya Robinson


As the COVID-19 pandemic raged through the world in the spring, Trump’s senior advisor Stephen Miller saw it as a unique opportunity to implement his extreme anti-immigrant policies, according to investigative journalist Jean Guerrero, whose new book, Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump, and the White Nationalist Agenda, was published in August. 

Continue reading ‘Hatemonger’ Examines Stephen Miller, the Extremist at the Heart of Trump’s White House

Undoing My Own Invisibility: In Celebration of Filipino/a/x American Heritage Month

by Jasmine M. Pulido


“… if you don’t see yourself represented outside of yourself you just feel fucking invisible.”

—John Leguizamo, Latin History for Morons

I have felt invisible for most of my life.

I have never immersed myself in a story where someone Filipinx American was the main character. I have never watched a show that was led by a Filipinx American protagonist. I have never read a book by a Filipinx American author. I haven’t ever had a Filipinx American neighbor, not even one, in the 15 years I have lived in Seattle.

It’s a problem.

Continue reading Undoing My Own Invisibility: In Celebration of Filipino/a/x American Heritage Month

The Emerald’s 2020 Voters’ Guide

by Emerald Staff

It’s that time again, and though some of us felt like this day would never come, for others it’s creeping up more quickly than we expected. In any case, it’s more important than ever to make sure that as voters, we’re armed with all the facts and resources we need to make informed choices. To that end, we present The Emerald’s 2020 Voters’ Guide.

Don’t Delay — Register Now and VOTE!

Continue reading The Emerald’s 2020 Voters’ Guide