Category Archives: Features

Life, Race and Politics After The Bernie Sanders Interruption

by Marcus Harrison Green and James Trimarco

The only time Marissa Janae Johnson ever doubted the interruption heard ’round the world came not long after she left a crowd of irate and disappointed Bernie Sanders supporters in a fury at downtown’s Westlake Park.

 

Read the entire article at the Seattle Weekly

Featured image Alex Garland

New Angeline Apartments, PCC, Highlight Columbia City’s Ever Changing Face

By Nicole Einbinder

Columbia City’s historic district in southeast Seattle is a world of its own.

Trendy new restaurants line Rainier Avenue among assorted retail shops, while crowds of young people pile into bars and music venues. Above it all looms the new, six-story Angeline apartments, situated above a PCC Natural Markets and boasting amenities from a fitness center to rooftop desk and pet wash station. Continue reading New Angeline Apartments, PCC, Highlight Columbia City’s Ever Changing Face

In Georgetown, the Housing Is Affordable and the Air Unbreathable

by Sara Bernard

In early 2015, Kelly Welker began to notice that the gritty air she was accustomed to breathing near her home on Flora Avenue South, in Georgetown, was grittier than usual. Within a few minutes of leaving her house, it would get into her eyes and burn. It would get into her sinuses and burn. It began searing her throat and coating her tongue, leaving a chalky, metallic aftertaste. The sinus pressure went from her face to her ears at night, and the burning feeling settled deep in her chest. “I even went in for a CT scan,” she says. “I felt like I had to take a running start to breathe.” (Read more at the Seattle Weekly)

Featured photo by Morgan Schuler

The Teacher Strike and the Cycle of Poverty

by Hanna Brooks Olsen (Featured Image courtesy of Michael “Renaissance” Moynihan)

If you know one thing about the teacher strike, it’s probably that the teachers are bargaining for higher wages, which is true.

Seattle Public Schools teachers haven’t had a cost of living adjustment in six years — and in that time, rents in Seattle have gone up about 40% in some places, meaning our educators are actively making less money than they were a few years ago, to do the same important job. Continue reading The Teacher Strike and the Cycle of Poverty

The Friendly Faces of Rainier Avenue

by Jama Abdirahman

Note: This article originally appeared on the Seattle Globalist and has been reprinted with permission.

What makes a place a “bad neighborhood?” Is it the people who live and work there?

In Seattle, Rainier Valley and Rainier Beach have bad reputations. Outsiders say they’re afraid to live there, or even visit. It’s true that some crime rates are higher, and sometimes tragedy strikes. But are these neighborhoods really as dangerous or scary as people say? Continue reading The Friendly Faces of Rainier Avenue

“History Favors the Prepared Political Movement” – An interview with Dr. Jill Stein

South Seattle Emerald’s Anne Althauser engaged Green Party presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein on topics of “lesser-evilism”, the importance of a “Green New Deal”, being an ally in the Black Lives Matter movement and why all politicians should spend a little time in jail on June 5th while she was in Seattle for the “Building an Alternative to Corporate Politics” Rally to support Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant’s reelection campaign.

A note from the interviewer:

When I was offered the opportunity to interview 2012 Green Party Presidential Candidate Dr. Jill Stein, my first thought was, “not even my liberal-Seattle-pro-choice-anti-war-power-to-the-people self is hippy enough for the Green Party.” There’s always been that stigma around Leftist politics, but my naïveté – nay, the money and power of our two-party political system – kept me from exploring progressive parties. Continue reading “History Favors the Prepared Political Movement” – An interview with Dr. Jill Stein

West Hill’s Concrete Mountain: Over Three Decades of Suffering Still Not Over for Local Residents

by Brie Ripley

A 30-year battle over the operations of an industrial company in West Hill is supposed to come to a court-ordered end on June 1, but despite environmental and health concerns alongside a bevy of complaints from the community and regulatory agencies, its mountain of concrete waste will continue to grow. Continue reading West Hill’s Concrete Mountain: Over Three Decades of Suffering Still Not Over for Local Residents

For South End Hit-and-Run Victims: Tragedy, Then Limbo

by Tom James

Quianna Holden is the kind of mother we all should have, if ever out of the darkness evil comes to strike us down.

A little less than two years ago, on the way home from a late-night teen basketball program, Quianna’s son Trevon was struck and gravely injured by a hit-and-run driver while in a crosswalk on Martin Luther King Jr. Way. Continue reading For South End Hit-and-Run Victims: Tragedy, Then Limbo

Former Inmate Says New King County Youth Jail Is a Mistake

This article was originally published in the Seattle Globalist and has been reprinted with permission.

by Taylor Winkel

As a young man, Heirius Howell spent a lot of time behind bars. He was locked up so often that he can’t remember exactly how many different times he saw the inside of King County Juvenile Detention Facility, but he guesses somewhere around 14.

Continue reading Former Inmate Says New King County Youth Jail Is a Mistake