Category Archives: History

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #26: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

By Irene DeMaris

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton is known as an abolitionist, suffragette and Susan B. Anthony’s bestie, but many don’t know her impact on theology as one of the foremothers of feminist biblical scholarship.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #26: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #25: Nana Asma’u

By Chrissy Barnes

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

I love looking back in time at small glimpses in history where women were heralded as celebrated leaders of their time, when their words were especially cherished and history refused to forget the impact they made on their societies. These moments seem to be small microcosms of elevated cultures, yet that mindset is lost repeatedly over the course of time. Civilizations forget the value of women’s leadership and the history books forget to highlight their contributions.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #25: Nana Asma’u

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #24: Amanda Nguyen

By Caitlin Moore

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 25 million Americans are rape survivors. That equals roughly one in every thirteen people, or, the entire population of Texas – the second most populous state in the Union.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #24: Amanda Nguyen

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #23: Vandana Shiva

By Elise Cope 

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

I first saw Vandana Shiva speak at Seattle Town Hall in 2013. As she spoke to “saving seeds as a political act”, I was struck by how the act of saving seeds is also a feminist and motherly act. Shiva is a demiurge of all my food system desires – a protector of our seeds, mother to our female food traditions. She speaks to womankind’s critical role in centuries of seed selection, thoughtfully picking the best varieties of staple foods, imbuing our motherly instincts to raise our little seedlings with the best shot at life possible. As women, mothers or not, our tendency to select for the whole tribe, nurturing for the long-haul, is instinctual. In Shiva’s ethos, food collection and preparation is inherently connected with environmentalism. In other words, getting down and dirty with your food’s lifecycle has an uncanny way of ushering you into earth stewardship. Shiva is an avid anti-GMO advocate and author of over 20 books. Her message is a holistic one, rooted in ecofeminism: in short – let’s stay connected to our food in it’s purest form, and absolve the notion that we are separate from nature.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #23: Vandana Shiva

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #22: LueRachelle Brim-Atkins

By Melia LaCour

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

If ever there was a healing remedy for those who have suffered from the ruthless and tempestuous storms wrought by racism, I know she would find it. If there was ever a way to wrap a whole community in one’s arms and love it until the light of hope could drown out thousands of years of oppression, she would figure it out. I have witnessed her strength and courage and am convinced that her reason for being is to make what seems impossible a reality. This story describes how a woman’s tenacious love of community has brought healing to many across the globe. For these reasons, I am honored to introduce to you, the revolutionary and inspiring LueRachelle Brim-Atkins.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #22: LueRachelle Brim-Atkins

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #21: Empress Menen

By Ariel Bangs

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

I am constantly asking myself, what inspires me as a woman? I look to the women in my life: the powerful pioneers filled with love, motivation and excitement. When I ask these women where their inspiration comes from, they direct me to the women who came before them – trailblazing the path to make the world a better place.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #21: Empress Menen

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #20: Misty Copeland

By Infinite Milam

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Born in Kansas City, Missouri and raised in San Pedro, California, Misty Copeland discovered ballet at the “late” age of 13. A true prodigy, she was dancing en pointe only three months after her first dance class and within a year of dancing professionally – a feat unheard of.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #20: Misty Copeland

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #19: Stanlie James

By Reagan Jackson

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

March is not only an opportunity to remember the past, but a time to think critically on how history is created. Who tells the story has a huge impact on how the story is told. And historically, history has not always been herstory. This is especially true when it comes to lives of black women.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #19: Stanlie James

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #18: Bridgette Hempstead

By Cynthia Green

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

The Rise of A Phenomenal Woman

I met Bridgette Hempstead almost 20 years ago when she came into the Renton Area Youth & Family Center (RAYS) Family Center in Skyway seeking office space. She had started a support group for cancer victims called Cierra Sisters after she was diagnosed with breast cancer and found little in the way of health resources for African-American women. “Cierra” is an African word meaning knowledge.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #18: Bridgette Hempstead

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #17: Bessie Coleman

By Charmaine Slaven

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

In the early 1900s, aviation was inspiring the imagination of the masses. Flying an airplane had become a reality for those who were daring and dedicated enough to learn. While many men were pursuing this dream, a few revolutionary women were making their mark amongst the flyboys. In the women’s arena, Amelia Earhart claimed much of the glory, as did her instructor, Neta Snook. Both received high accolades from the media and their male peers. Lesser known was Bessie Coleman, who was not only an early female aviator, but also the first woman of African American and Native American descent to hold an American and international pilot’s license.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #17: Bessie Coleman