Category Archives: News

Not Registered for the August 3 Election? Here’s How to Fix That and Get Your Ballot

by Phil Manzano


While you may find it difficult to pull away from the sunny reverie of summer, there’s an important election on the horizon for Seattle and King County. Here’s a primer on how to make sure you make your voice heard in the upcoming Aug. 3 primary election, when voters will weigh in on county, city, and special district elections.

The deadline to register online or by mail for the Aug. 3 primary election, July 26, has already passed. You can register to vote in person for the primary election up to and including Election Day, Tuesday, Aug. 3.

Continue reading Not Registered for the August 3 Election? Here’s How to Fix That and Get Your Ballot

NEWS GLEAMS: Vaccine Pop-up, Student Jobs at SPL, Preparing for Wildfire Smoke, More!

curated by Emerald Staff

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!


Image: American Indian Health Commission/Tribal/Urban Indian Health Immunizations Coalition.

Vaccine Pop-Up in White Center, Wednesday, July 28, Noon–6 p.m.

American Indian Health Commission and Tribal/Urban Indian Health Immunizations Coalition are “Pulling Together for Wellness” and providing free vaccines to adults and children 12 and older on Wednesday, July 28 from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. No appointment necessary! Free emergency dental services are also available by appointment (call 480-760-1486 to schedule).

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS: Vaccine Pop-up, Student Jobs at SPL, Preparing for Wildfire Smoke, More!

As Cases of Delta Variant Rise in King County and State, Mask Guidelines Revised

by Andrew Engelson


With the highly contagious Delta variant of COVID-19 causing a rise in case counts and hospitalizations in both King County and Washington State among those who have not been vaccinated, local health authorities have revised masking guidelines.  

On Monday, July 26, health officials from eight Puget Sound counties issued a joint statement recommending that all residents in those counties (including King, Pierce, and Snohomish) should wear masks in indoor public spaces.

“We recommend all residents wear facial coverings when in indoor public settings where the vaccination status of those around you is unknown,” the statement reads. “This step will help reduce the risk of COVID-19 to the public, including customers and workers, help stem the increase in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in many parts of the state, and decrease the spread of the highly contagious Delta variant.”

Continue reading As Cases of Delta Variant Rise in King County and State, Mask Guidelines Revised

Incumbents Face Off With Social Justice-Minded Challengers for Port Commission

by Hannah Krieg


Paige Robertson is a young climate justice advocate who lives under the flight path of Sea-Tac International Airport. This means an aircraft could be over her head as often as every 45 seconds, said another concerned resident of the SeaTac area. 

According to a 96-page report by Public Health – Seattle & King County, more than 50% of the people in King County who identify as Black/African American, Hispanic, Latino, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander live within 10 miles of the Sea-Tac airport. This same radius also has the highest rating for negative health outcomes such as heart disease, stroke, respiratory disease, premature birth, and cancer. 

Continue reading Incumbents Face Off With Social Justice-Minded Challengers for Port Commission

Mayor Durkan Announces Community-Based Programs, Responding to Gun Violence Spike

by Lizz Giordano and Andrew Engelson


As shootings spike in King County, disproportionately impacting Communities of Color, Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan announced last week the City will distribute $12.4 million to organizations working to curb gun violence and improve safety in BIPOC communities. 

The year 2020 was particularly deadly for Seattle, recording the highest number of homicides in more than a quarter century. This past weekend, a series of shootings in Belltown, Pioneer Square, the Chinatown-International District, and Yesler Terrace left five people dead and nine injured according to the Seattle Police Department (SPD). In a press conference on Monday, July 26, Durkan said the violence was part of a surge in homicides across the United States. 

“This weekend delivered a sober reminder that Seattle is not immune from gun violence,” Durkan said during the press conference. “This is a national crisis. Over the past week, from Chicago to Minneapolis to Washington, D.C., there have been over 900 shooting incidents.”

Continue reading Mayor Durkan Announces Community-Based Programs, Responding to Gun Violence Spike

‘Seattle Cruise Control’ Coalition Aims to Cancel Cruises

by Alex Garland 


Seattle has a new group of concerned citizens, and their sole focus is getting cruise ships out of Puget Sound. The “Seattle Cruise Control” (SCC) coalition has activists from multiple non-governmental organizations coming together for a “Cruise Free Salish Sea.” 

According to a press conference on Monday, July 19, at Smith Cove Park, SCC’s concerns are centered around the cruise industry’s lax environmental standards and poor labor practices. Cruise ships in Seattle are a divisive issue, with many pointing to the hundreds of millions of dollars the industry brings to the region, while others say the damage to the climate and those who work on ships or live near their berths isn’t worth the profits.

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Seattle’s Mayoral Candidates Talk About Post-Pandemic Arts Recovery at Arts Forum

by Mark Van Streefkerk 


On Thursday, eight of Seattle’s mayoral candidates shared their plans for reviving the city’s arts communities at an Arts Forum at the Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. All the candidates agreed that arts and culture recovery is a necessary component in the city’s overall post-pandemic healing, but each had a different idea of how to go about it. 

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After History of Gentrification, Resolution Proposed to Compensate Central Area Church

by Elizabeth Turnbull


Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant unveiled a resolution July 21 to compensate the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church and others for land taken by the City under the “urban renewal” programs of the 1950’s and 60’s.

The legislation comes after advocacy by the senior pastor of the New Hope Missionary Baptist Church, Rev. Dr. Robert Jeffrey Sr., who is calling on the city to return the land or pay reparations for land taken, provide funds to build 87 units of affordable housing to fight displacement, and to create a Central Area Homeownership Fund to help Families of Color build equity in their community.

Continue reading After History of Gentrification, Resolution Proposed to Compensate Central Area Church

Public Safety Agencies Announce Plan for New 911 Triage Team

by Paul Kiefer


(This article originally appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement) 

By next summer, Seattle’s emergency call dispatchers may have a new crisis response team at their disposal. The new unit, called Triage One, would be housed within the Seattle Fire Department’s Mobile Integrated Health program and tasked with responding to some crisis calls that don’t clearly involve a medical emergency or criminal activity.

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City Expected Encampment on School District Property After Sweeping Nearby Park

by Erica C. Barnett

(This article previously appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement)


During an often rowdy public forum in the cafeteria of Broadview-Thomson K-8 school last week, Seattle Public Schools Deputy Director Rob Gannon said the school district is working slowly toward a plan for moving more than 50 unsheltered people off school district-owned property behind the North Seattle school. The City of Seattle has refused to assist the school district in sheltering or housing people living on the property, and the district has turned to a small nonprofit called Anything Helps with the goal of getting everyone off the site by September.

Continue reading City Expected Encampment on School District Property After Sweeping Nearby Park