Category Archives: News

Clean Greens Brings Sustainable Food Economy to Seattle

by Nicole Pasia

Rev. Dr. Robert Jeffery, Sr. always enjoyed his meals, but never thought much about what he was eating. That changed in the early 2000s, when he was diagnosed with diverticulitis, an intestinal disease that affects food digestion.

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Trailblazers Establishes Educational Pillars for Students of Color

by Carolyn Bick

In Theresa Hardy’s Trailblazers class at Washington Middle School, change starts with a fundamental shift in how the class’ middle school students view themselves.

“Either they consider themselves a victim, they act like a victim, or they think like a victim – or they don’t understand what’s happening to them. So from victim, going through the Trailblazers program, they become educated,” Hardy said. “Once you become educated, and educated on how to navigate through the system, you can be successful. … And from educated, they become educators.”

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Seattle Could See More Backyard Cottages and Mother-In-Laws — What Does that Mean for Housing Affordability?

by Aaron Burkhalter

Four years ago, the city of Seattle first began the process of lifting restrictions on mother-in-law apartments, basement apartments, backyard cottages and other accessory dwelling units.

These structures and housing add-ons are often known by different acronyms: ADUs (Accessory Dwelling Units) and DADUs (Detached Accessory Dwelling Units). Setting the legislative alphabet soup aside, these are basically residential structures or apartments that share space inside or on the same property as single family homes. In a city where housing is scarce and single-family homes take up a disproportionate share of the land, allowing more of these could make a difference.

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D2 Candidates Talk Transportation, Housing, and Sustainability City Council Heats Up

by Jake Goldstein-Street

Half a dozen candidates for the Seattle City Council’s District 2 spot met for a Tuesday night forum at the New Holly Gathering Hall as they answered questions on transportation, housing, and the environment — three of the most important issues for local residents facing gentrification and displacement, pushing them farther and farther away from their jobs, forcing them into cars, and driving up carbon emissions.

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Black That Won’t Budge: DeCharlene Williams’ Legacy Re-emerges as a Grand Re-Opening

by Alexis Taylor

Nestled on the small corner of 21st Avenue East and East Madison Street in the heart of Seattle’s Central District, DeCharlene Williams plugged in her beauty shop’s hair dryers for one of the last times in her life.

Her worn hands knew this routine all too well. On a brisk, overcast day in February of 2018, the shop came to life. She flipped on the main lights and placed her business marquee out front. She pulled out every gel, moisturizer, and hot comb alike, as she set up a chair for a box braid appointment she had scheduled for 8:30 a.m.

I was her client that Saturday morning, and what I would later come to find out, one of the last appointments she’d get the chance to do before her untimely passing from cancer in late May of 2018.

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District 2 Candidates Fundraising in Crowded Race for City Council

Candidates draw contributions from individuals, organizations, and Seattle’s Democracy Vouchers program. Next candidate forum is at New Holly on May 28.

by Carolyn Bick

Seattle’s elections are this coming November, and the field doesn’t want for candidates, particularly in South Seattle’s District 2.

While two have dropped out, there are still seven candidates running for Seattle City Council’s open District 2 seat, the winner of which will represent the neighborhoods of Southeast Seattle and Georgetown.

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Local, State Organizations Encourage Inclusion of Communities in Midst of 2020 Census Fears

by Hannah Myrick

Communities across King County risk being undercounted in the upcoming census because of fear around a potential citizenship question, according to organizations that work with undercounted populations in Washington.

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