Category Archives: Opinion

OPINION: Washington’s Paid Family and Medical Leave Program Supports Workers, Businesses

by Lauren Hipp

As we welcome in the New Year, there are many reasons to celebrate. But perhaps one of the biggest is that on January 1, Washington took a huge step toward ensuring that workers across the state will have access to comprehensive paid family and medical leave for the first time. This will make a huge difference in the lives of so many families, and I’m especially excited about the changes it will bring for mine.

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Once Upon a Riot: A Christmas Tale

by Bypolar

What do we imagine when we think of Christmas? A rosy-cheeked white grandfather who promises you your wildest dreams wrapped in paper decorated with snowmen and candy canes? Waking up to the smell of baked goods, excitement bouncing in your hearts? For some, even the smell of fresh cut pine or carolers pestering you at the door, yule logs burning, stockings hanging, shadows reflecting in the flames. Many see Christmas as a celebration of the birth of Jesus or as a marketing myth to increase winter sales for corporations. Though others understand that it is inspired by old “pagan” traditions, people usually do not learn where the traditions came from originally.

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OPINION: Urge City Council to Support Green Pathways Fellowship Program

by Lavanya Madhusudan

There is an acute lack of representation of people of color in the green sector. According to the thoroughly researched Green 2.0 report, the percentage of minorities on the boards or general staff of environmental organizations in the US does not exceed 16 percent. Once hired in environmental organizations, ethnic minorities are concentrated in the lower ranks. As a result, ethnic minorities occupy less than 12 percent of leadership positions in the green sector.

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The Minority Report: Lynnwood Man Uses DNA Test to Claim Native Identity

by Bypolar

I read an article a while back about Ralph Taylor, a white business owner from Lynnwood who took an at-home DNA tests that estimated he was 90 percent European, 6 percent Native and 4 percent sub-Saharan African. Now he, of course, feels he should be qualified for insurance breaks meant for business owners of color, naturally.

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One Last Chance to Stop Luxury Homes at Talaris and Gain So Much More for the Whole City

by Laura Loe, Gregory Quetin, and Andy Katz

The lack of affordable places to live, fueled by rising rents and home prices, has pushed many people out of the city, and some people out of stable housing altogether. Building a lot more housing in North Seattle won’t solve South End displacement, but we, members of Share the Cities, believe it is a piece of the housing crisis puzzle and will take some of the gentrification pressure off areas at risk of displacement throughout Seattle. Share The Cities is asking you to take action by October 24 on the Talaris Master Use Permit. This historic open space should be used as the catalyst for a more affordable community, with abundant housing choices.

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YMCA Provides Mitigation Funds for Powerful Schools Closure

by Erin Okuno, Heather Hart, and Idil Danan

At the end of last school year, a group of parents requested the YMCA of Greater Seattle provide $20,000 in mitigation funding to schools because the Y was closing its long-serving and popular Powerful Schools programs. The YMCA honored this request at eight schools that had comprehensive Powerful Schools programs.

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Fighting for the City We Need

by Kshama Sawant, Violet Lavatai, Zoe Schurman, David Parsons, Nickelsville Central Committee, Matt Remle, Juan Jose Bocanegra, Tim Harris, Shaun Scott, and Kailyn Nicholson

The notice on her door was jolting: You have to move because the apartment building is being demolished to make way for more a profitable housing development. It was the fourth time that Esther “Little Dove” John, a retired psychology professor and long-time Beacon Hill resident, has been “demovicted” in Seattle — forced out of her home by big developers.

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