Category Archives: Opinion

A Day at Freedom School: How Could Other Education Models Transform Our Public Schools?

by Guy Oron

On a hot Thursday summer morning in a church in South Beacon Hill, I joined about 40 people of all ages, from youth to elders, to learn about racism. Organized by Youth Undoing Institutional Racism (YUIR), which is affiliated with the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond, Tyree Scott Freedom School is a five-day summer camp, primarily for youth and young adults of color, which focuses on community organizing, learning a deeper analysis about racism and systems of oppression, and undoing racism in our society.

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Protestors Unite Following City Attorney’s Threat to Aggressively Prosecute ‘Reckless’ Protesters

by DJ Martinez

In an Op-Ed for the Seattle Times August 29, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes wrote that he would no longer be “turning a blind eye” to protesters who invoke their First Amendment rights by using non-violent protest tactics that block city traffic, in reaction to recent protests earlier this year held by activists from multiple movements.

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Shaping the 21st Century Workers’ Movement

by Rachel Lauter

Here in Washington, we have strong labor unions to help protect the gains workers have made since the first Gilded Age, and lead the fight to raise new standards in today’s Gilded Age. But with the decades-long attack on organized labor, an anti-worker zealot in the White House, and recent Supreme Court decisions like Janus vs AFSCME, it is clear that we also need new models of building power for workers.

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Some Depend on Generosity of No. 7 Bus Drivers; RapidRide Could Change That

by Mary Hubert

Susan* is all business as she boards the 7, toting a cart with her that contains most of her belongings and expertly flipping up the front seats on the bus to nestle it securely in an out-of-the-way spot. She rides this route frequently.

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Stop the Jail, But Also Stop the Racist and Punitive Family Court System

by S. Annie Chung

Over the past six years, since voters in King County passed a tax levy to pay for a new “Youth and Family Services Center,” opposition has been steadily and relentlessly growing. Hundreds of organizations and countless community members have been part of the No New Youth Jail campaign. As pressure mounts to stop construction, I want to make sure people are thinking not only about the youth jail the County continues to build this very minute, but also about the court facility that is part of the same construction project.

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We came together again to make working conditions at Sea-Tac Airport better

by Eleine Senebeto

In 2013, I worked at Sea-Tac airport in a job that paid poverty wages. I pushed wheelchairs, helping people navigate the airport. My wage was $9 an hour. To make ends meet, I worked 14-hour shifts, often pushing two wheelchairs at a time.

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Punishing Shelter Providers Won’t Solve Seattle’s Homelessness Crisis

by Kayla Blau

There have been rumblings that the City of Seattle may fine local shelters that don’t move enough clients into permanent housing. When it comes to homelessness in Seattle (which has one of the most expensive rents in the nation), our city leadership must have better solutions than charging struggling nonprofits that are working diligently to house clients in a city with no available affordable housing.

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