Category Archives: Opinion

Puyallup Tribe and Friends Battle Unsafe Fracked Gas Plant

by Megan Cornish

The Puyallup tribe and other environmental activists are waging a heroic and determined fight against a disastrous liquid natural gas (LNG) plant at the Port of Tacoma, Wash. Planned and approved virtually in secret, it would feature a 140-foot-tall, 8 million gallon tank of liquid natural gas stored at –260ºF. The facility would be located in a populated area — within the city. The site is also adjacent to tribal land, mere feet from its salmon restoration project. Close by is the NW Detention Center, a for-profit immigration prison, whose 1,500 detainees would be trapped in an emergency. Continue reading Puyallup Tribe and Friends Battle Unsafe Fracked Gas Plant

Bike Lanes Throughout Rainier Valley Could Start a Much Bigger Change

by Andrew Kidde

If you look at the City of Seattle’s map of the major bike routes, you’ll see that Southeast Seattle is poorly served. There are few bike routes at all, and no north-south route (the way our valley stretches) that is flat, connects bicyclists to stores and services, and is safe.  Rainier Avenue would meet all those criteria, except for safety.  As anyone who’s tried it will tell you, you take your life in your hands when you ride a bike on Rainier. Yet recent SDOT planning efforts may make Rainier a safe route for biking. Continue reading Bike Lanes Throughout Rainier Valley Could Start a Much Bigger Change

Resisting the Heat and the Haze

by Hodan Hassan and Sean O’Neill

Between a record high heat wave and a looming haze of smoke over the city (that’s traveled from wildfires in British Columbia), Seattle is currently experiencing some of our most oppressive weather in our city’s history.  As the fallacies of climate denial, individual green consumerism, and carbon market solutions take center stage, Got Green has been amplifying the importance of naming the roots of our extreme weather. Continue reading Resisting the Heat and the Haze

With Automatic Voter Registration, I Can See Women Like Me in Politics

by Olivia Perez

Eleven days after my 18th birthday, I voted in my first election. That wasn’t the only first: because my parents aren’t U.S. citizens, I was one of the first people in my family to be eligible to vote in any U.S. election. From a very young age I have wanted to run for office. I struggled to believe that running for office was a possibility for me because I never saw women who looked like me in positions of political power. Continue reading With Automatic Voter Registration, I Can See Women Like Me in Politics

Mayor’s Race: As Seattle Goes, So Goes the Country

by Brian Stout

With worsening dysfunction at the federal level, it is increasingly clear that any hope for large-scale progressive change must come from cities and states.  Confronted by a Trump agenda that seeks to sacrifice critical social and environmental protections on the altar of corporate profit, the next mayor of Seattle is uniquely positioned to demonstrate that there is a better path.  Continue reading Mayor’s Race: As Seattle Goes, So Goes the Country