Category Archives: Perspective

Seattle Police Reform Needs More Direct Democracy

by Howard Gale

The birth of Seattle’s Community Police Commission (CPC): an advisory body

In August 2010 First Nations woodcarver John T. Williams was murdered by Seattle police officer Ian Birk, becoming the latest and most egregious civil-rights violation (aka, crime) committed by Seattle police against people of color and marginalized communities in recent memory.  The fact that officer Birk was never prosecuted, or even charged with a crime, added to a pervasive sense of outrage across diverse communities in Seattle. This led the ACLU of Washington, joined by 34 other local organizations (among them the NAACP of Seattle King County, El Centro de la Raza, Central Area Motivation Program, Mothers for Police Accountability, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, and International District Housing Alliance), to write a letter to the US Department of Justice (DOJ), calling on them to investigate the Seattle Police Department (SPD) for civil-rights violations (1). Continue reading Seattle Police Reform Needs More Direct Democracy

Why Columbia City Needed “Name Tag” Days

by Shelley Morrison and Karla Esquivel 

We like to think Columbia City feels like a small town in the midst of a big, growing city. One of the best things about our community is that we know each other, and we don’t want to lose that as we grow. There is something special about going into a neighborhood shop or restaurant and saying “Hi” to an owner or staff person and knowing them by name, and they knowing yours.  There’s a feeling of belonging.   Continue reading Why Columbia City Needed “Name Tag” Days

It is Time to Talk About Basic Income, Again

by Brian Bergen-Aurand

I’m now convinced that the simplest approach will prove to be the most effective—the solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income

~Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? (1967)

47%. By some predictions, 47% of the jobs currently available in the United States will be lost to automation and other factors in fewer than fifteen years. These estimations are respected predictions, made by economists, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and other employment market watchers. Other prognostications set the number at greater than 50%. By 2030, perhaps half the jobs currently available in the United States will disappear. Continue reading It is Time to Talk About Basic Income, Again

The Crackdown on Immigrants and Refugees is Everyone’s Issue

by NaKeesa Frazier-Jennings

Almost two decades ago, my husband and I, both born in Washington, DC moved to Seattle, Washington.  In my teens, I worked in the downtown area of DC in a very prestigious internship with the federal government.   During that time, I noticed something very significant at the end of each workday.  Continue reading The Crackdown on Immigrants and Refugees is Everyone’s Issue

We Can Divest From Fossil Fuels and Invest Into Communities and a Clean Energy Economy

by Rashad Barber

Last week it was painful to see the eviction of hundreds of water protectors at Standing Rock, by local police and the US Army Corps. Over 700 water protectors are facing criminal charges, and 5 facing federal charges. And yet, the fight is far from over. Continue reading We Can Divest From Fossil Fuels and Invest Into Communities and a Clean Energy Economy