Category Archives: Perspective

OPINION: Seeing Through the Illusion of KKKapital

by Villainus (formerly Bypolar)

In society, we work for wealth — or at least we think we do. What if i told you it was truly a fictional story? That we do not work for wealth, but instead give ourselves to become someone else’s wealth, in exchange for a note that represents a piece of our time but not the value of it. That wealth was never achieved by hard work and commitment but instead by manipulation and coercion.

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Perspective: Bursting Bubbles and Meeting Racism Face-to-Face in the South End

by Cecilia Erin Walsh

“Sidewalk closed.” I stepped around the construction site sign, pressed the crosswalk button, and waited. The usual traffic on Alaska Street crossed in front of me, loud but not so as loud to drown out the voices of construction workers behind me.

“And did you hear about the synagogue in Pittsburgh? All those Jews being killed?” one man asked another, who responded “Oh, yeah,” like he’d rather not talk about it.

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From the Archives: Seattle’s Gilded Age — Housing for Trees, but not for People

This article originally appeared on the South Seattle Emerald April of 2018.

by Jonathan Rosenblum

Rubi moved to Seattle last year, arriving after a long road journey from southern California. She immediately found secure housing that met all of her needs.

Rubi had it easier than the 1,000 people who move to our city every week and are blown away by skyrocketing rents. She didn’t have to worry about finding a safe place nightly, like the 8,500 people who are living on the streets, under bridges, in abandoned buildings, in RVs, and in shelters. And she didn’t share the anxiety of the 100,000 Seattleites whose crushing rents are forcing them to forgo basic necessities of life. Continue reading From the Archives: Seattle’s Gilded Age — Housing for Trees, but not for People

Reflecting on the Education and Diversity of the Annual MLK March and Rally

by Georgia S. McDade

It was great to be at Garfield High School for the 37th Annual MLK Day Rally and March January 21. Thousands of people were present for the half a day of activities around the theme “Affirmative Action = Justice: Equal Opportunity in Education, Jobs, Contracts.”

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Non-Violence in a Violent World

by Ijeoma Oluo

This is a transcript of a speech delivered at the 45th Annual Community Celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 2018. The event was sponsored by Seattle Colleges, at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Seattle.

Like many black children, I was raised with tales of the great Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Much of that narrative — at home, in school, in television and in film — centered around Dr. King’s commitment to nonviolence in his fight for racial equality. Continue reading Non-Violence in a Violent World

The Displacement Tax: An Update from Gentrification Ground Zero

by Reagan Jackson

Rainier Beach is the new gentrification ground zero. I have a front row seat. I recently celebrated my seventh anniversary of being a homeowner. I have watched my neighbors get foreclosed on and pushed out. I have watched the house flipping teams come through and trim up the yards, slap up new fences, and paint over bright color with the neutral blues and grays white people seem to prefer. When I walk through my neighborhood now, it’s a lot less like the vibrant diverse place I chose to live in and a lot more like Pleasantville.

Continue reading The Displacement Tax: An Update from Gentrification Ground Zero