Category Archives: Op-Ed

Why the Landlord Lobby Should Fear the Washington Tenant Movement

by Gina Owens

Washington tenants face skyrocketing rents, unduly harsh eviction laws, and weak enforcement of tenant protections. Several years ago, I was in a car accident that rendered me disabled and unable to work. While I was in the process of getting Social Security Disability approved, I was evicted because I could not pay my full rent. Prior to the accident, I had had two decades of good rental history, but that did not protect me.

Continue reading Why the Landlord Lobby Should Fear the Washington Tenant Movement

Family Separations Will Have Lasting Health Consequences on Our Society; Here’s What You Can Do to Help

by Erica Soelling, DNP, ARNP, FNP-BC

This is one of a series of articles written by Commissioners from The Seattle Women’s Commission. The Commission advises the Mayor, City Council, and City of Seattle departments on issues that impact the women of Seattle.

The troubling separations of children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border will have long-lasting consequences on our community. Therefore, the Chairs of our Commission’s four subcommittees, including Community Health and Wellness, Economic and Educational Opportunities, Equitable Development, and Violence Prevention and Justice have each penned Op-Eds relating to how family separations will impact these four areas in our community. See previous posts here and here.

The true character of society is revealed in how it treats its children.” This Nelson Mandela quote is remarkably prescient today, as draconian immigration policies separate and detain families at the border and within our city limits. These policies are wreaking havoc on the health of women and children, families, communities, and our nation.

Continue reading Family Separations Will Have Lasting Health Consequences on Our Society; Here’s What You Can Do to Help

Trump Administration Cans Gender Wage Data Collection – Leaving Cities to Pick Up the Bag

by Hanna Brooks Olsen

Without federal data collection, local information gathering will be more important than ever

Last week, the Trump administration announced that it would halt data collection from businesses with over 100 employees—close to 63 million businesses in total. The program, initiated by the Obama administration, was designed to find potential solutions to the ongoing racial and gender wage gaps among private employees. Similar data had been collected among federal contractors for years. Continue reading Trump Administration Cans Gender Wage Data Collection – Leaving Cities to Pick Up the Bag

I’d Like To Be Taxed, Please

by Ashok Chandwaney

Tax day is the day that ordinary Americans send their money to Washington, D.C., and wealthy Americans send their money to the Cayman Islands. – Jimmy Kimmel

Nowhere is this more true than Seattle. Working class people pay 16.8% of their income in taxes to make this city run. The wealthiest only pay 2.4%. I’m a tech worker, and expect to make over $250,000 this year and more in the future. Living in Seattle is a lot like if I hid my money in the Cayman Islands: I pay nearly nothing but still benefit by using roads, transit and all the other things working people fund. Continue reading I’d Like To Be Taxed, Please

Sawant and O’Brien: “If teachers go on Strike on May 1, We’ll Have Your Back!”

by Kshama Sawant and Mike O’Brien, Seattle City Councilmembers

Over the next week, members of the Seattle Education Association (SEA), the union that represents educators in Seattle’s public schools, will be voting on whether to take an important step in defense of public education.

If this vote is approved by the SEA membership, our city’s public school educators will hold a one-day strike on May 1, International Workers’ Day and historically a day of immigrant rights protests. Continue reading Sawant and O’Brien: “If teachers go on Strike on May 1, We’ll Have Your Back!”