Category Archives: Voices

Opinion: State Tax Credit Would Help Thousands in Seattle Community

by Michelle Merriweather


A tax credit proposal in the Washington State legislature would mean almost 1 million Washington households – nearly 30 percent of our state’s population – could see a cost-of-living boost. If passed, the Working Families Tax Credit would have positive ripple effects throughout our community, supporting the economic well-being of African American communities throughout the Central District, south King County, and the entire region. Continue reading Opinion: State Tax Credit Would Help Thousands in Seattle Community

Protestors Won’t Stop Fighting King County’s New Multi-Million Dollar Youth Jail

by Sharon H Chang


When Seattle’s new $242 million youth jail opened Tuesday, the third week of Black History Month, there were already Black and Brown children locked inside. King Country authorities had transferred incarcerated youth from the old facility next door six days earlier. And though Tuesday was a beautiful winter day, the youth could not see the clear skies or enjoy the sunshine outside. The updated jail may be new, but the children’s cells are still small and sterile, windowless and lonely–and still cages. Continue reading Protestors Won’t Stop Fighting King County’s New Multi-Million Dollar Youth Jail

South Seattleites Weigh In On Their Picks for President

collected by Emerald Staff


March 10 is Washington’s first presidential primary election.  For the first time, our state is in play leading up to the National Democratic Convention this summer. King County Elections mailed primary ballots out this week. Voters will have nearly two weeks to cast their vote and return their stamp-free ballot to a drop box or by mail. Drop boxes will close March 10 at 8 p.m.

Today, the Emerald features essays written by South Seattle folks about why they are supporting their candidate. More essays to follow. Continue reading South Seattleites Weigh In On Their Picks for President

Perspective: Black History (Still) Matters

words by Rev. Adam Lawrence Dyer

(The following is taken from a sermon delivered February 2nd)


Dear Betsy,

As a Black woman & the Chair of the abortion access task force, I invite you to come by the Hill and say this to my face.

Would welcome the opportunity to educate you.

Regards,
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley

Congresswoman Pressley tweeted these words in response to Betsy Devos, Secretary of Education when the secretary compared being pro-choice to being pro-slavery.  If you want to be utterly sick to your stomach, look up the tweet and read some of the replies. I pray for the congresswoman’s safety and resilience and I pray that we can find ways to support not just her efforts, but the world view that brings her light into our lives. Continue reading Perspective: Black History (Still) Matters

Opinion: Trump’s Travel Ban Expansion is an Attack on Black Muslims — And We Demand to be Heard

by Iman Mohamed


While many celebrated the beginning of Black History Month a couple of weeks ago, our president and his administration celebrated by expanding the Muslim Ban to include seven more countries — five of which are African. In total, nine of the thirteen countries listed on the Muslim Ban are now African, causing many of the continent’s diaspora to refer to it as the #AfricanBan. With this recent expansion, the ban is estimated to affect more than a quarter of Africa’s population. Continue reading Opinion: Trump’s Travel Ban Expansion is an Attack on Black Muslims — And We Demand to be Heard

Opinion: Marginalized and Privileged in Seattle

by Jasmine Pulido


I didn’t know I was marginalized.

And that’s part of my privilege.

Marginalized. Privileged. I didn’t feel the weight of these terms until I started digging into racial equity at my daughter’s predominantly-white school a few years ago. As leader of their “Diversity Committee”, I felt pressure to be knowledgeable about the language around social justice and my own experience as a person of color. I took on the position not because of any particular personal experience or profound perspective, but simply because no one else stepped forward. Continue reading Opinion: Marginalized and Privileged in Seattle

Optimism, Opportunity On Display at Seventh Annual State of Africatown

by Georgia McDade


Though the sky was cloudy and gray Saturday morning, the inside of Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute at 104 17th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98144 was sunny and bright. Well over 100 people celebrated the Seventh Annual State of Africatown, a collective of African and African-American-owned businesses dedicated to making life better for African and African-Americans. Continue reading Optimism, Opportunity On Display at Seventh Annual State of Africatown

A Love Story: My parents Were the First Couple to Wed While Interned With Other Japanese Americans

by Sharon Maeda


“Cupid Behind the Barbed Wire Fence” was The Oregonian’s headline. My parents, Milton and Molly Maeda had the dubious distinction of being the first couple to wed while incarcerated with other Japanese Americans.

Just five days after Valentine’s Day 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that tore 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from their homes, businesses, schools and farms and sent them to American concentration camps. Continue reading A Love Story: My parents Were the First Couple to Wed While Interned With Other Japanese Americans

Ask A Therapist: Why Is Talk of Trauma So Prevalent Nowadays?

by Liz Covey

Question: Why is everything all about “Trauma” nowadays? I know some people have genuinely had terrible experiences, but it just seems like everyone is becoming a victim now.  I mean, don’t we all have to get through some hard stuff when we are kids or at some other time? Not trying to be insensitive, just genuinely curious if this is healthy.

 

Dear Reader,

I hear you loud and clear on this one, though from a slightly different perspective. There’s a lot of talk about trauma these days, without a lot of explanation. Continue reading Ask A Therapist: Why Is Talk of Trauma So Prevalent Nowadays?