Category Archives: Voices

OPINION: Let’s Go Vote

by Pari McDonald, Ana McDonald, Marina Rojas, and Chiara Zanatta-Kline

(This article originally appeared on the South End Stories Youth Blog.)


The voices of those who are furthest from opportunity, who are actively being suppressed and kept from voting, must be heard, especially during this election. Ana (18), Pari (15), and Cymran (13) McDonald decided they wanted to do something about creating easy, accessible ways for the communities that they love and who have lifted them up in life, to register to vote. The sisters worked with young adults Chiara and Marina to build Mini Voter Registration Boxes for areas where QT/BIPOC voters may have difficulty printing voter registration forms or may not be able to easily get stamps or envelopes, especially during COVID. The girls also wanted to ensure that young voters were easily able to access voter registration by providing texting and QR codes to register online. Boxes were placed in the Central District, New Holly, White Center, High Point, Renton, Federal Way, and Tacoma.

Continue reading OPINION: Let’s Go Vote

OPINION: The World We Need Must be Built by Community Not Courtrooms

by Sean Goode


As a child, my family was always on the move — 12 different homes in 12 years of school. It was always something: hiding from my abusive father, getting evicted, or that time we owned a house and the bank foreclosed on it. I learned many lessons while constantly acclimating myself to new spaces. The most valuable of them is that nothing lasts forever. The transient nature of my upbringing gave me terrific respect for the miracle of each day and a faith that has allowed me to unapologetically hold on to a hope for a better tomorrow. 

Continue reading OPINION: The World We Need Must be Built by Community Not Courtrooms

Weekend Long Reads: Remdesivir Is No Wonder Drug

by Kevin Schofield

In this column, I’ll be giving you pointers to some of the most interesting articles and studies I’ve recently come across. I’ll be aiming for things that are “less than a book, but more than a newspaper article” — readings that are a bit of a mental workout to take in but that expand our perspectives and make us better informed in our daily lives. I’ll also try to pick items that share the joy of reading outside your area of expertise: articles not so technical and arcane that they are incomprehensible but that still give us a glimpse of how experts think about work in their own field.

Continue reading Weekend Long Reads: Remdesivir Is No Wonder Drug

Sunday Comix: King 5-0

by Brett Hamil

You can now order “Modest Incremental Change NOW,” a collection of my Sunday Comix spanning the entire messed-up summer of revolution, copaganda and liberal cooption in Seattle. Order your copy at: https://bretthamil.bigcartel.com/


Brett Hamil is a writer, cartoonist and performer living on the South End of Seattle. He produces the weekly comedy show Joketellers Union and the political comedy talk show The Seattle Process. The Seattle Weekly (RIP) once called him “the city’s premier political comic.”

Remembering Renee Davis: Mother, Cultural Advocate, Victim of Police Violence

by Rae Rose

(This article originally appeared on Last Real Indians and has been republished with permission) 

On Oct. 21, 2016, Muckleshoot tribal citizen Renee Davis was shot and killed by King County Sheriffs who were conducting a welfare check in her home. Renee was pregnant at the time of the shooting. Her family continues to demand justice.

Listening to the stories of Renee Davis from the people who knew and loved her paints a vivid picture in my mind of a strong, beautiful, and loving woman. Renee’s story is the story of an Indigenous woman, a future leader, a proud member of the Muckleshoot tribe, and a dedicated mother of three beautiful girls with a baby boy due only months away.

Renee Davis didn’t have the most stable of childhoods, she and her sisters were in and out of foster care. Through it all Renee strived to be there for her sisters, later reconciling and caring for her mother. Renee always gave of herself because she didn’t want anyone to suffer; through everything her heart remained open to everyone around her. It is clear that Renee was a survivor with the strength and love to give to others even when she herself was hurting.

Continue reading Remembering Renee Davis: Mother, Cultural Advocate, Victim of Police Violence

OPINION: Referendum 90 Will Provide Youth With Needed Sex Education and Resources I Wish I’d Had

by Deaunte Damper

I grew up in the South End of Seattle. I always felt like I had to be silent about who I was as a person. I didn’t have an opportunity to be an openly queer male. I didn’t receive any validation growing up and didn’t have the education I needed when it came to this subject, especially when it came to my identity. My community, in which I was enmeshed, was heavily church-led and infused with a stigma around homosexuality.  

Continue reading OPINION: Referendum 90 Will Provide Youth With Needed Sex Education and Resources I Wish I’d Had

Black and Center: Archiving Indigenous and Black Futures

by Jasmine Jamillah  Mahmoud

On one street mural, a radiant yellow circle frames a feminine figure who holds her right palm outwards and left arm downwards. Adorned in a cedar hat, turquoise necklace, and multi-colored ribbon belt, the figure stands in front of outstretched butterfly wings rippling with red, orange, yellow, and purple colors. Most distinctive is the figure’s face, smeared with a jarring red handprint. Beyond this, the words “PROTECT INDIGENOUS WOMXN” anchor the mural’s mostly purple background.

Continue reading Black and Center: Archiving Indigenous and Black Futures

Seedcast: Indigenous Filmmaking, Using Technology to Adapt to COVID

by Ben-Alex Dupris

Indigenous peoples and communities have long used stories to understand the world and our place in it. Seedcast is a story-centered podcast by Nia Tero and a special monthly column produced in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald about nurturing and rooting stories of the Indigenous experience.


I recently directed a tribal honoring segment for All In Washington: A Concert For COVID-19 Relief. It was aired live on local television and now lives on Amazon Prime. The celebrity-filled virtual event, which included Coach Pete Carroll, Macklemore, and Pearl Jam, raised 45 million dollars for local organizations struggling desperately to provide support to Washington State residents during coronavirus. It was an exciting opportunity to get paid for creative work in the middle of the pandemic.  

Continue reading Seedcast: Indigenous Filmmaking, Using Technology to Adapt to COVID

Sunday Comix: Seattle, Actually

by Brett Hamil

You can now order “Modest Incremental Change NOW,” a collection of my Sunday Comix spanning the entire messed-up summer of revolution, copaganda and liberal cooption in Seattle. Order your copy at: https://bretthamil.bigcartel.com/


Brett Hamil is a writer, cartoonist and performer living on the South End of Seattle. He produces the weekly comedy show Joketellers Union and the political comedy talk show The Seattle Process. The Seattle Weekly (RIP) once called him “the city’s premier political comic.”

OPINION: The Complex Journey of a Transitional Immigrant: Words for Rahwa

by Lola E. Peters


One of my first conversations with Rahwa Habte was about the complexity of being a transitional immigrant. I’ve learned a lot since the day, 63 years ago, that I stepped off a plane into my new American life.

My story differs from Rahwa’s. My mother was the first Ethiopian woman to marry an African American man. Their story and wedding in the beautiful Greek Orthodox St. George Cathedral in Addis Ababa made the newspapers on both continents. 

Continue reading OPINION: The Complex Journey of a Transitional Immigrant: Words for Rahwa