Category Archives: Voices

OPINION: Reflections on Insurrection — a Reason to Fear

by Glenn Nelson

Content Warning: This article contains strong language. 


A few decades back, I was in the heart of Mitch McConnell country — aka Kentucky. Being a longtime basketball writer, I was fascinated with that region’s love affair with the sport. Everyone in that particular, depressed coal-mining region was white and seemed to have a hoop, built mostly on dirt patches.

My hoops background was urban, so very concrete. Seeing a wooden backboard, set on a wooden plank, stuck in a clutch of dried mud in Middle-of-Nowhere, USA, was a wonder. I got out of my car for a closer look.

Some movement in the corner of my eye made me spin toward an adjoining shotgun shack — to spy a literal shotgun pointed at me.

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OPINION: Fort Sumter Redux

by Geov Parrish


Neo-Confederates have wanted to re-litigate the Civil War for generations. Yesterday, they lost again — but their privilege protected them in the effort.

Tuesday night, we learned that even in the Deep South, the political power that flows from white privilege can no longer be assumed. One hundred and sixty years ago, that fear of losing political power— then inspired by an incoming, abolitionist-supported Lincoln administration — sparked the shots fired on Fort Sumter that began the Civil War.

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Sunday Comix: It’s Blocky

by Brett Hamil


You can now order “Modest Incremental Change NOW,” a collection of my Sunday Comix spanning the entire messed-up summer of revolution, copaganda and liberal cooption in Seattle. Order your copy at: https://bretthamil.bigcartel.com/


Brett Hamil is a writer, cartoonist and performer living on the South End of Seattle. He produces the weekly comedy show Joketellers Union and the political comedy talk show The Seattle Process. The Seattle Weekly (RIP) once called him “the city’s premier political comic.”

FUTURE GAZING: Honor the Indigenous people of these territories

by Roxanne White


I am Roxanne White. I am Nez Perce, Yakama, Nooksack, and Aaniiih (Gros Ventre) Nations. I want to honor our ways and acknowledge I am a guest to this Coast Salish territory. I acknowledge that these are the ancestral homelands of the Duwamish, Suquamish, Tulalip, and Muckleshoot Nations. 

I’ve been asked what my vision is for Seattle and what I would like to see once renewal begins. Immediately I looked up the english definition of the word “renewal”: To resume after a long interruption and to replace something that was rundown, worn out, or broken. 

My vision would be that renewal begins with the curriculum our children are taught. The education system needs to teach the truth about who Native people were and are! But the story has to be told by us. It’s very important that history is told by the people it impacted and affected. Indigenous people have been passing down our oral history for generations. We’re the ones that know who we are. 

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ASK A THERAPIST: Taking Stock at the End of the Year of Everything

by Liz Covey, LMHC


I’m anything but a historian, but this whopper of a year has me thinking like one. I find myself pondering what it means to have lived through 2020, a year that was full of so much and also so little. A year so unique that it will be talked about for decades to come, if not forever, just as we swap stories about where we were when the Towers fell or when Kennedy was shot. But however alike in terms of before-and-after comparisons, those events were mere instances, specific moments in time. Questions to which there is a simple answer.

What about the momentous phenomena that occurs over a long period of time? The flash points of history that seem to unfold in slow-motion, or more accurately, in regular motion — that which occurs at the pace of day to day life? What do we make of events that happen amidst the laundry and the bill paying and which will span enough time for some to have two birthdays come and go? 

The kind of experience that allows one to answer the where were you question is distinctly different from the one that asks how. How were you the year that everything happened, beauty and terror, to loosely quote Rilke. 

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COVID’s Heartbreak Half Mile: What Lessons to Take Into 2021?

by Sarah Stuteville


A decade ago, I went through a brief period of long-distance running. During that time, I was introduced to the idea that, no matter the length of the run, it will be the last half mile that nearly kills you. My father, a man who has made a personal study of physical endurance in the mountains of the Pacific Northwest, often refers to this phenomenon as the “heartbreak half mile.” It is when we see the light at the end of a challenge that we start to fully experience the cost of the miles behind us, exponentially compounding the effort ahead. The last stretch may be short, but it is intense as hell and is often where we most squarely face ourselves.

Continue reading COVID’s Heartbreak Half Mile: What Lessons to Take Into 2021?

Sunday Comix: The Eyes of Antifa

by Brett Hamil


You can now order “Modest Incremental Change NOW,” a collection of my Sunday Comix spanning the entire messed-up summer of revolution, copaganda and liberal cooption in Seattle. Order your copy at: https://bretthamil.bigcartel.com/


Brett Hamil is a writer, cartoonist and performer living on the South End of Seattle. He produces the weekly comedy show Joketellers Union and the political comedy talk show The Seattle Process. The Seattle Weekly (RIP) once called him “the city’s premier political comic.”