Category Archives: Voices

Opinion: Marginalized and Privileged in Seattle

by Jasmine Pulido


I didn’t know I was marginalized.

And that’s part of my privilege.

Marginalized. Privileged. I didn’t feel the weight of these terms until I started digging into racial equity at my daughter’s predominantly-white school a few years ago. As leader of their “Diversity Committee”, I felt pressure to be knowledgeable about the language around social justice and my own experience as a person of color. I took on the position not because of any particular personal experience or profound perspective, but simply because no one else stepped forward. Continue reading Opinion: Marginalized and Privileged in Seattle

Optimism, Opportunity On Display at Seventh Annual State of Africatown

by Georgia McDade


Though the sky was cloudy and gray Saturday morning, the inside of Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute at 104 17th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98144 was sunny and bright. Well over 100 people celebrated the Seventh Annual State of Africatown, a collective of African and African-American-owned businesses dedicated to making life better for African and African-Americans. Continue reading Optimism, Opportunity On Display at Seventh Annual State of Africatown

A Love Story: My parents Were the First Couple to Wed While Interned With Other Japanese Americans

by Sharon Maeda


“Cupid Behind the Barbed Wire Fence” was The Oregonian’s headline. My parents, Milton and Molly Maeda had the dubious distinction of being the first couple to wed while incarcerated with other Japanese Americans.

Just five days after Valentine’s Day 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that tore 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from their homes, businesses, schools and farms and sent them to American concentration camps. Continue reading A Love Story: My parents Were the First Couple to Wed While Interned With Other Japanese Americans

Ask A Therapist: Why Is Talk of Trauma So Prevalent Nowadays?

by Liz Covey

Question: Why is everything all about “Trauma” nowadays? I know some people have genuinely had terrible experiences, but it just seems like everyone is becoming a victim now.  I mean, don’t we all have to get through some hard stuff when we are kids or at some other time? Not trying to be insensitive, just genuinely curious if this is healthy.

 

Dear Reader,

I hear you loud and clear on this one, though from a slightly different perspective. There’s a lot of talk about trauma these days, without a lot of explanation. Continue reading Ask A Therapist: Why Is Talk of Trauma So Prevalent Nowadays?

Opinion: The State of Our Union

By Congressman Adam Smith (D-Wash.)


It is inevitable that members of Congress will have disagreements about the policy and approach laid out by the President in the State of the Union each year. On Tuesday, however, we saw an abdication from the truth by President Trump like we have never seen before in a State of the Union address to Congress. President Trump laid out a twisted, distorted vision that misled the American people on critical issues and failed to acknowledge certain threats entirely. Many of his claims were unequivocally false. Continue reading Opinion: The State of Our Union

Opinion: SB 6282 Is A Poison Pill to Kill Desegregation of Advanced Learning Programs in SPS

By Vivian van Gelder and Bao Ng


Overcoming their usual reluctance to interfere with local control of public education, State legislators recently put forward a bill that would place significant obstacles in the way of desegregating Seattle Public Schools’ self-contained Highly Capable Cohort program. That program, in which white and affluent students are dramatically overrepresented, is the descendant of “gifted” programs originally created to stem white flight from Seattle Public Schools (SPS) during the busing era of the 1980s. Continue reading Opinion: SB 6282 Is A Poison Pill to Kill Desegregation of Advanced Learning Programs in SPS

Opinion: As a Mom and a Public Health Professional, I’m Celebrating Washington’s New Paid Leave Program 

by Zandrea Harlin


When I discovered I was pregnant about three years ago, my husband and I were thrilled. Almost immediately, we focused on figuring out what sort of parental leave we would be able to take. We were both working full-time, and we needed both incomes to cover our expenses.

I’m a huge policy nerd and I had studied this issue for years. I believed I understood the strengths and weaknesses of the paid leave policies in place at the time. Through my research and activism, I had much more knowledge than most as I tried to determine how long I’d be able to bond with my baby and recover from birth before returning to work. Continue reading Opinion: As a Mom and a Public Health Professional, I’m Celebrating Washington’s New Paid Leave Program 

“Fat Weirdos” for The Win: How to teach a Toddler About Difference and Not Raise a Jerk

by Sarah Stuteville


On a cozy Saturday morning as I ate blueberry pancakes, my then three-year-old son leaned into his godmother and announced, “You are a big, fat weirdo!”

Toddlers do all sorts of embarrassing things—from loudly discussing their genitals on public transportation to casually using the “f-word” when they drop a grape at a dinner party. But for me—a socially anxious empath—there is nothing more mortifying than watching my kid hurt someone’s feelings. Add a dash of political sensitivity aimed right at my how-to-raise-a-nice-white-boy angst, and you’ve summoned my perfect storm of social horror. Continue reading “Fat Weirdos” for The Win: How to teach a Toddler About Difference and Not Raise a Jerk