Category Archives: Voices

Grassroots Reflections on the COP25

by Nancy Huizar and Sean O’Neill

Got Green is an environmental justice organization that builds community power in working-class communities in South Seattle. Got Green envisions healthy and resilient communities, where all people are able to: (1) work meaningful jobs that nourish our earth, our communities, and our souls; (2) eat affordable, healthy food that is grown with dignity for workers and the environment; (3) live in safe and sustainable housing, rooted in climate resilient neighborhoods; (4) and care for our environment in our relationship to the land, the climate, and each other.

Got Green’s Climate Justice Organizer Nancy Huizar had the opportunity to travel to Madrid to meet with social movement leaders during the week of COP25 – the United Nations’ climate conference.  The following is a conversation between Nancy Huizar and Sean O’Neill (Got Green’s Development Director) about the purpose of this trip, the proposals being discussed at COP25, and the need for international solidarity. Continue reading Grassroots Reflections on the COP25

Input Sought for Southeast Seattle Education Coalition’s Family Engagement Survey

by Erin Okuno

We believe children, especially children of color, have the right to be whole, well, and successful. With this belief the Southeast Seattle Education Coalition and their partners set out to construct a family engagement survey to learn how families feel about engaging with schools and the education system. Continue reading Input Sought for Southeast Seattle Education Coalition’s Family Engagement Survey

Opinion: Fighting Antisemitism in the Name of Collective Liberation

by Rabbi David Basior

Do you remember where you were when 9/11 happened? Most likely, if you were above the age of five, you have a memory of where you were that day.

I was in New York City and had just entered my midtown Manhattan office where I served as an assistant at a real estate management company –– my first job after graduating from the University of Florida. The office was situated within three city blocks from Grand Central Station, the Empire State Building, the Consul General of Israel, and the United Nations’ headquarters. I had just seen Michael Jackson perform at Madison Square Garden the night before, and I was coming in a few minutes later than my expected 9 a.m. start time. The events unfolding downtown made my slightly late arrival go unnoticed, which I had only a moment to be thankful for before learning why everyone was so soberly concerned. Continue reading Opinion: Fighting Antisemitism in the Name of Collective Liberation

Community Voices: A Metro Field Trip Opened Our Eyes to How Women Guide Public Transportation

By Franklin High School students Yuki McKenzie and India Unwin

For our recent field trip to Bellevue as part of the Women’s Transportation Seminar Transportation YOU program , we were told that we would be taking a bus, so we expected a regular yellow bus rental. What we got instead was a chartered King County Metro bus with “SPECIAL” on the LED display! On our way across the lake, we happened to pass by some new Sound Transit Light Rail construction. Continue reading Community Voices: A Metro Field Trip Opened Our Eyes to How Women Guide Public Transportation

Equity is the Engine: The “Pimp my Ride” Parable

by ChrisTiana ObeySumner

Almost three years ago, I began my first business as a social equity consultant. I had been an advocate and community organizer for years before, fighting for intersectional disability issues. Recently, someone asked me what the most common question I received was. I shared that it was often a rambling thought containing three main questions: (1) “Can you help me understand the difference between Diversity, Equity and Inclusion(DEI); (2) Will it help us/me better figure out how to ensure I’m being equitable and inclusive in my business/advocacy/life; (3) What does equity and inclusion really mean anyway?” Continue reading Equity is the Engine: The “Pimp my Ride” Parable

OPINION: The Tax Code Should Advance Racial Justice

by Margaret Babayan & Andy Nicholas 

We need to talk about our racist tax code.

Washington’s state tax code was created within many economic and legal systems and institutions aimed at keeping people of color from having access to wealth and opportunity: segregation, employment and housing discrimination, and cultural assimilation, among so many other things. Built on a history of institutional and systemic racism, this state tax structure – which is the most inequitable in the nation because it relies on those with the least to pay the most – is both a product of and perpetrator of racial and ethnic inequalities. In short, our state tax code compounds the barriers to economic opportunity faced by many communities of color. Continue reading OPINION: The Tax Code Should Advance Racial Justice

OPINION: Remembering the Battle in Seattle 20 Years Later

by Susan Fried (words and photos)

It’s been twenty years since I photographed some of the events surrounding the World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Seattle in November 1999. Lots of people who remember it at all, think of it as the “Battle in Seattle,” or the WTO riots,but my memories are of a mostly-peaceful protest attended by over 40 thousand people that thought like me; that believed in livable wages, safe working conditions, and protecting the environment. It was one of the most empowering events of my life. There were people representing labor, the environment, farmers, NGO’s, student and religious groups–all there to speak out against an organization that they believed had too much control over everyday people’s lives. They believed that–as one of the chants the protestors used–said, “Another World is Possible.” Continue reading OPINION: Remembering the Battle in Seattle 20 Years Later