How Can Seattle Live King’s Legacy?

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day the Emerald posed a question to community members and local officials: How can Seattle truly live Dr. King’s Legacy? Their responses follow.

Legacies are tricky. With Dr. King’s, we tend to paint with a broad brush – highlighting his charisma yet glossing over the virtue of his persistent study and growth. Dr. King was a real person – learning and evolving until the dark day he was shot. We should recognize this growth as integral to his legacy, and hold the words and actions that shortly preceded his death as the culmination of his worldview.

By 1968, after years of fighting segregation in the South, King labored over broader systemic problems like poverty and economic injustice stating, “It’s much easier to integrate a lunch counter than it is to guarantee an annual income.” Through his work, Dr. King came to recognize that black liberation would require “forcing America to face all its interrelated flaws – racism, poverty, militarism and materialism.” Continue reading How Can Seattle Live King’s Legacy?

Non-Violence in a Violent World

by Ijeoma Oluo

This is a transcript of a speech delivered Friday, Jan. 12, at the 45th Annual Community Celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr., sponsored by Seattle Colleges, at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Seattle.

Like many black children, I was raised with tales of the great Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Much of that narrative — at home, in school, in television and in film — centered around Dr. King’s commitment to nonviolence in his fight for racial equality. Continue reading Non-Violence in a Violent World

Tipping the Scales: What Will the Slim Democratic Majority Mean for These Four Bills Waiting in the Wings?

by Ashley Archibald

(This article was originally published in the Jan 10 issue of Real Change and has been reprinted with permission)

A New Year, A New Legislative Session

Lawmakers returned to Olympia to kickoff a legislative marathon with a regular session on Jan. 8 that will wrap up on March 8. That gives relatively little time for legislators to get through a raft of pre-filed bills, as well as the hundreds that have languished in the House Rules committee, waiting to see the light of day in the Senate. Continue reading Tipping the Scales: What Will the Slim Democratic Majority Mean for These Four Bills Waiting in the Wings?

With Her, For Her: Reflections From a New Parent

by Zoe True

We all have priorities that pull us away from civic life. Paradoxically, it is often these very same priorities that drive us to get involved in our communities in the first place. This was certainly the case for me. My transition into parenthood in 2017 was especially emotional thanks to our country’s turmoil. But looking to 2018, and the role each of us can play, gives me hope. Continue reading With Her, For Her: Reflections From a New Parent

“Mad Bus Driver” Hosting Columbia City Theater’s Got Laffs Comedy Jam

by Gus Marshall

On Saturday, January 13 Columbia City Theater will host Seattle’s first ever “Got Laffs Comedy Jam.” The event will feature seasoned comedians coming together for a night showcasing their craft.

Randolph “Apollo” Thompson, a veteran of the entertainment industry, founded the event. His Dallas-based promotion company “Cut The Jive Entertainment” will bring some of the finest comedians from all over the country to Seattle for an evening of laughs not to be slept on by anyone calling themselves a fan of standup comedy. Continue reading “Mad Bus Driver” Hosting Columbia City Theater’s Got Laffs Comedy Jam

Creating Community: Lessons Learned In The Barbershop

by William Jackson

“What should young people do with their lives today? Many things, obviously. but the most daring thing is to create stable communities in which the terrible disease of loneliness can be cured.”—Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

While sitting in the barbershop waiting for my turn to get my hair cut, I could not help but witness the similarities a barbershop has to a classroom. Each barbershop has a barber, and patrons waiting for their opportunity to get their hair cut. Similarly, in each classroom, there is a teacher, and students waiting for the opportunity to be taught. Interestingly, while waiting for my haircut appointment, I could not help but draw the connection this experience had to classroom and community engagement. Continue reading Creating Community: Lessons Learned In The Barbershop

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