Hell Is Other People: How to Survive Your Family in Captivity

by Liz Covey, LMHC, Therapist & Parent Coach


No one ever promised that scrolling would bring satisfaction, much less relief, but here I am, doing more of it than ever. More than in life-before-this. I invariably come across dozens of articles with advice for treating this quarantine time like a retreat or a sabbatical, with suggestions for DIY spa days, esoteric crafts, or Kondo-ing the sock drawer while we are all shut-in. Continue reading Hell Is Other People: How to Survive Your Family in Captivity

OPINION: Rebounding With Justice

by Mike McGinn

Here’s what an economist might say “The drive for efficiency across our economy has taken all the slack and redundancy out of the system needed to respond to a crisis. Combined with low personal savings, significant segments of the public lack the resources to respond.”

Let’s translate that. The relentless drive for profits combined with hoarding of wealth has put all of us in the crosshairs of a deadly pandemic. Continue reading OPINION: Rebounding With Justice

OPINION: When Non-Disabled People Get Accommodations, Who Benefits? Things to Think About as We Work Remotely

by Carrie Basas and Erin Okuno

This article was originally published on Fakequity.com and has been reprinted with permission.


Many people across the country and globe are now working remotely. Organizations such as ours are working from home to limit the spread of COVID19. Carrie’s team has telecommuted for three years. Almost overnight, we’ve seen other organizations move to Zoom video meetings, conference calls, webinars, Facebook Live, and other tools to replace in-person meetings and to allow for social distancing (everyone stay at home). Continue reading OPINION: When Non-Disabled People Get Accommodations, Who Benefits? Things to Think About as We Work Remotely

New Hunger Strike Draws Attention to Health Conditions at Northwest Detention Center

by Alex Garland (words and photos)


At the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC), a privately-operated immigration prison owned by GEOGroup, in Tacoma, a protest is growing exponentially. Over the weekend, nearly 220 detainees joined 30 fellow detainees already involved in a hunger strike to protest living conditions and concerns over the COVID-19 virus, especially in cramped, unhygienic conditions.

Continue reading New Hunger Strike Draws Attention to Health Conditions at Northwest Detention Center

OPINION: Now is the Time To End Private Prisons in Washington State

by Sen. Rebecca Saldaña


The Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) in Tacoma incarcerates immigrants as their immigration cases—which can take years—play out in court. Don’t let the name “detention center” fool you; this 1,575-bed facility is a prison–the only private for-profit prison in Washington state, owned by the GEO Group, one of the largest operators of prisons. Continue reading OPINION: Now is the Time To End Private Prisons in Washington State

Inslee considers extending stay-home order, addresses violation reporting, equipment shortages

by Carolyn Bick

Though the rate of novel coronavirus infections has slowed, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee said that Washingtonians still aren’t staying home enough.

At a televised press conference on March 30, Inslee said that the data that has come in over the weekend has been “alarming.” The number of positive tests that have been coming in from counties surrounding King County, such as Skagit County, Adams County, and Island County have been two to three times higher than the week or so before. 

Inslee attributes this to people going out too often on non-essential trips, thereby not following his stay-home order as well they should.

Continue reading Inslee considers extending stay-home order, addresses violation reporting, equipment shortages

OPINION: Financial Support in the Age of Coronavirus

Our support systems are stronger, but still don’t cover many modern job situations

by Marilyn Watkins


The coronavirus pandemic has most of us hunkering down at home and thousands of businesses forced to close their doors. New unemployment insurance claims from out-of-work Washingtonians rose the second week in March to more than 14,000, from an average of about 6,000 a week the previous month. Continue reading OPINION: Financial Support in the Age of Coronavirus

Seattle Artists Offer Hope and Inspiration During COVID-19, Even as They Struggle Themselves

by Sharon H. Chang


It has been said that life depends on science, but the arts make it worth living. So what role do artists play during a pandemic? A really big one. There is ample research showing the many benefits of the arts: improved mood, increased cognitive function, even boosted immunity. From streaming performances to online workshops and movement classes, Seattle artists are helping people find hope and inspiration during the COVID-19 outbreak even as they struggle themselves. Continue reading Seattle Artists Offer Hope and Inspiration During COVID-19, Even as They Struggle Themselves

OPINION: Is Banishment Sufficient to Heal a Wound?

by Bob Hughes, Ed.D.


I’ve been reading with some interest the stories about Bellevue College’s recent experience with an administrator’s attempted silencing of an artistic statement about the Japanese internment during WWII. The story interests me on many levels, most of which are personal. I’m a former community college administrator of color who’s also conducted research on community colleges’ diversity and still continues to consult on issues of equity and diversity.  So I have more than a mild interest.  Continue reading OPINION: Is Banishment Sufficient to Heal a Wound?

Amplifying the Authentic Narratives of South Seattle