31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #22: Ava DuVernay

In honor of Women’s History Month, we present 31 Days of Revolutionary Women; a series of daily essays by local authors documenting, honoring and celebrating powerful women who inspire us in South Seattle and beyond.


by Hodan Hassan

I love stories and storytelling; that means I love stories told on screen, both big and small. I have been watching TV shows and movies for a very long time. It is how I learned to perfect my English and pick up on slang. It’s long been a passion of mine. Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #22: Ava DuVernay

Mayor Vows Equitable Upgrades for “Most Dangerous Street in Seattle”

By Erica C. Barnett

Less than an hour after Mayor Ed Murray wrapped up a press conference to announce new pedestrian-safety improvements along Rainier Avenue South, a collision between a car and a semi shut down the intersection of Rainier and South Alaska St. — an in-your-face reminder that whatever the city has done to calm what is frequently referred to as “the most dangerous street in Seattle”, there’s still plenty of room for improvement.  Continue reading Mayor Vows Equitable Upgrades for “Most Dangerous Street in Seattle”

People In Your Neighborhood: Everybody Needs an Auntie G

by Kris Kendall

Last month I wrote this column by asking a few questions to a man that was a stranger to me. This time, I took those same questions to a woman we’ll call Auntie G.

I’ve known Auntie G as a neighbor since I moved to Rainier Beach in 2010. She and her daughter moved from Fairhope, Alabama to Seattle in 1988, and she has lived in the Central District, Beacon Hill and on MLK. For the past 21 years, she has lived in the same house in Rainier Beach. She’s the kind of neighbor I’m glad to have. Auntie G may keep a low profile, but I’m pretty sure nothing happens on this block that she isn’t aware of. Continue reading People In Your Neighborhood: Everybody Needs an Auntie G

Breaking Down Stigmas On Homelessness One Conversation at a Time

by Kelsey Hamlin

I was already going to be late for my morning class at the University of Washington, so I figured I might as well grab a coffee on my way, thinking ten more minutes of tardiness wasn’t going to do much more damage. Walking into my 20 person class unprepared, however, I realized I was wrong. We had guest speakers. Homeless guest speakers. I looked down at my green-labeled coffee and thought, yet again, how privileged I am. That money could’ve gone elsewhere. Continue reading Breaking Down Stigmas On Homelessness One Conversation at a Time

Dear The Beauster: I Want to Turn My Passion for Spanikopita Into a Business

by Beau Hebert 

Dear The Beauster,

My sister and I are budding chefs who love to cook and throw dinner parties and are seriously thinking about opening our own restaurant. She’s great with soups and breads and I’m sort of famous for my Mediterranean cuisine. People go gaga over my spanikopita. I know you operate a couple of restaurants and so I thought you might have some advice for us.

Sincerely, South Seattle Foodie for Life. Continue reading Dear The Beauster: I Want to Turn My Passion for Spanikopita Into a Business

So What Happened At Midtown Center?

by Erica C. Barnett 

The fate of a proposed deal between the nonprofit group Africatown and the environmental preservation group Forterra to buy and develop the Midtown Center property at 23rd Ave. and Union Street hit a wall last week, when the owners of the property, the Bangasser family partnership, changed the locks at the office occupied by Black Dot, an incubator for African-American-owned businesses. According to a police report obtained by Capitol Hill Seattle, the lease for the space Black Dot was occupying ended in February. Black Dot was never the leaseholder on the space. Continue reading So What Happened At Midtown Center?

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #21: Gloria Martin

In honor of Women’s History Month, we present 31 Days of Revolutionary Women; a series of daily essays by local authors documenting, honoring and celebrating powerful women who inspire us in South Seattle and beyond.


by Helen Gilbert

When I first met Gloria Martin in 1972, I was a 17-year-old high school student. My friends and I had been searching for a way to connect with the tide of feminist, antiwar and civil rights activism all around us. After trying out different groups and activities we came across Radical Women. It was love at first sight! Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #21: Gloria Martin

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