A Homeless Community Scatters as Camp Dearborn Swept

by Alex Garland  (Originally published on The Dignity Virus)

At approximately 8am this morning, the Seattle Police Department began evictions and removal of personal property from the Dearborn encampment. Residents were given 30 minutes to pack their belongings, though city officials claimed police had given inhabitants warnings all week. The claim was contradicted by many on site as they gathered their personal items.  Continue reading A Homeless Community Scatters as Camp Dearborn Swept

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #11: Queen Nanny

By Ava Ryerson

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

I’m here to spotlight a revolutionary woman and freedom fighter credited with leading radical initiatives and rebellion efforts against slavery institutions for over two decades in 18th-century Jamaica.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #11: Queen Nanny

Dear the Beauster: North Seattle Gives Me the Heebie-Jeebies

by Beau Hebert

 

Dear The Beauster,

 Every time I have to head north of Seattle’s Mt. Baker neighborhood my flesh starts to crawl. Going to Ballard last weekend induced dry heaving. Avoid it as I might, I know I’m going to have to venture to North Seattle at some point – what suggestions do you have for me to not plunge into despair whenever I do?

 Sincerely,

North Seattle Gives me the Heebie-Jeebies. Continue reading Dear the Beauster: North Seattle Gives Me the Heebie-Jeebies

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #10: Mavis Staples

By Emily Naftalin

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Mavis Staples was only ten years old when she stood up to sing before the congregation of a Chicago church. But with her small chin held high, she was already embracing her gift of a uniquely powerful, breath-taking voice.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #10: Mavis Staples

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #09: Leslie Feinberg

By Catherine Petru

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Leslie Feinberg bears remembering for two significant reasons: 1) Ze (alternative gender pronoun, “zee”) was the first author I read who made plain the imperative of trans liberation, and 2) Ze is an inspiring example of a white anti-racist author and activist – an example those racialized as white desperately need in a country where white supremacy is still de facto in policy and practice.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #09: Leslie Feinberg

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #08: Claudette Colvin

By Rachel Tefft

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

A 15-year-old girl sits alone on a bus. Two grown men stand above her, yelling at her to get up. She refuses, stating that it is her constitutional right to sit there. They each grab an arm, one of them kicking her in the stomach, while they drag her backwards off the bus. These men are policemen and she is a black girl in Montgomery, Alabama. It is March 2nd,1955 and Claudette Colvin has refused to give up her seat for a white woman.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #08: Claudette Colvin

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