Tag Archives: 31 Days of Revolutionary Women

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #13: Marie Dorion

By Dee Vadnais

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

 

Marie  Dorion was born around 1786, a member of the Iowa Tribe. She is known for her participation in the Astor Expedition, begun in 1811, six years after the return of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The Astor Expedition set out to reach the same geographic endpoint as Lewis and Clark, but with trade as the motivation and goal.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #13: Marie Dorion

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #12: Mary Fields

By Dejah Léger

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

 

DID YOU KNOW?

Mary Fields was the first woman AND the first African-American to work for the post office. (Wait, don’t go. This is cool, I swear.)  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #12: Mary Fields

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #11: Queen Nanny

By Ava Ryerson

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

I’m here to spotlight a revolutionary woman and freedom fighter credited with leading radical initiatives and rebellion efforts against slavery institutions for over two decades in 18th-century Jamaica.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #11: Queen Nanny

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #10: Mavis Staples

By Emily Naftalin

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Mavis Staples was only ten years old when she stood up to sing before the congregation of a Chicago church. But with her small chin held high, she was already embracing her gift of a uniquely powerful, breath-taking voice.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #10: Mavis Staples

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #09: Leslie Feinberg

By Catherine Petru

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Leslie Feinberg bears remembering for two significant reasons: 1) Ze (alternative gender pronoun, “zee”) was the first author I read who made plain the imperative of trans liberation, and 2) Ze is an inspiring example of a white anti-racist author and activist – an example those racialized as white desperately need in a country where white supremacy is still de facto in policy and practice.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #09: Leslie Feinberg

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #08: Claudette Colvin

By Rachel Tefft

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

A 15-year-old girl sits alone on a bus. Two grown men stand above her, yelling at her to get up. She refuses, stating that it is her constitutional right to sit there. They each grab an arm, one of them kicking her in the stomach, while they drag her backwards off the bus. These men are policemen and she is a black girl in Montgomery, Alabama. It is March 2nd,1955 and Claudette Colvin has refused to give up her seat for a white woman.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #08: Claudette Colvin

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #07: Kathrine Switzer

By Hattie Quick

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

Almost 50 years ago, in 1967, Kathrine Switzer was the first woman to register in and complete the Boston Marathon. There were no rules about women racing, but as a function of the times, it was extremely discouraged. So much so that race director Jock Semple attempted to remove Kathrine from the race at the 4 mile mark with physical force. Thankfully, Kathrine was able to continue the race without any other disturbances.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #07: Kathrine Switzer

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #06: Daisy Bates

By Marilee Jolin

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

 

Too often, women are expected to be silent and submissive.  We are still taught – implicitly and explicitly – that we are safest and most secure when we go quietly about our business, don’t rock the boat and make sure other people are comfortable.  I have personally bought into this role in a big way and it is only recently that I am learning how to stand up and speak the truth, no matter who I offend.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #06: Daisy Bates

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #05: Septima Clark

By Elizabeth Hunter

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

As we find ourselves again in the midst of presidential campaigning, a reminder of our right to vote is important. Perhaps particularly so with the continuing concern of voter suppression in some states that have sought Congressional and Supreme Court review of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.  Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #05: Septima Clark

31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #04: Margaret Sanger

by emily charlotte taibleson

In honor of Women’s History Month, we’ll be posting one story each day of March written by local citizen journalists about a revolutionary woman from history or today who has inspired them as women.

One hundred years ago the U.S. postal service refused to distribute Margaret Sanger’s monthly publication The Woman Rebel for its violation of postal-obscenity laws. Below, I am publishing the letter she sent to her subscribers in the wake of her persecution in 1914. Information regarding self care and contraception continues to be controlled by higher-up-outside sources today. Continue reading 31 Days of Revolutionary Women, #04: Margaret Sanger