Tag Archives: Abolition

Who Keeps Us Safe? | Episode 1: What Does Safety Mean to You?

(Artwork: Tianliang Ning)

Who Keeps Us Safe? is a podcast by Asian Americans living in Seattle that explores safety, policing, and abolition in our communities and beyond. Join us monthly as we speak with organizers in the Seattle area, and reflect on their work and learnings. We hope that our listeners will use this podcast to begin and/or supplement their own conversations about safety and policing in their own communities. This is a project of PARISOL: Pacific Rim Solidarity Network, a grassroots anti-imperialist, anti-capitalist, Hong Konger, Taiwanese, and Chinese* diaspora group based in Seattle. PARISOL is dedicated to local & international solidarity, community building, cultural & politicized learning, abolition, and anti-racist work.


Who Keeps Us Safe? (WKUS) is a podcast by Asian Americans living in Seattle that explores safety, policing, and abolition in our communities and beyond. In each monthly episode, we speak with organizers in the Seattle area, and reflect on their work and learnings. 
In partnership with the South Seattle Emerald and KVRU 105.7FM, WKUS is relaunching a previously recorded podcast each month at the Emerald.

Continue reading Who Keeps Us Safe? | Episode 1: What Does Safety Mean to You?

OPINION: Abolition Is Survivor-Centered Justice

by Caedmon Magboo Cahill, Shannon Perez-Darby, and DeAnn Alcantara-Thompson


Seattle local elections are underway, and for the first time voters are presented with two abolitionist candidates. In the race for Seattle City Attorney, much has been said about how abolition would negatively impact public safety. One of the more persistent refrains is the narrative that pursuing abolition is turning our backs on domestic violence survivors. We write to dispel this myth. As a former public defense attorney, a community organizer currently working at a local anti-violence organization, and survivors with a combined experience of over 35 years supporting survivors of domestic and sexual violence, we maintain it is abolition — rather than criminalization — that is the path toward survivor-centered justice. 

Continue reading OPINION: Abolition Is Survivor-Centered Justice