Tag Archives: African diaspora

OPINION: Seattle’s Curbs and Corners

by bigg villainus


As I’m preparing to leave Seattle, I will live out of my car and travel the nation advocating for prison abolition and building solidarity with other abolitionist communities. And as I prepare to leave, a haunting thought sets in. I am once again going to be houseless, in a pandemic no less. 

Continue reading OPINION: Seattle’s Curbs and Corners

Kwanzaa — a Holiday of Purpose and Principles

by Patheresa Wells


A seven-day African American and Pan-African celebration starting on Dec. 26, Kwanzaa — created in 1966 by Maulana Karenga — was developed as a way to connect, commemorate, and honor community and culture by focusing on Nguzo Saba, or the Seven Principles of Kwanzaa. These principles are rooted in traditions of first fruits or harvest celebrations that are found throughout Africa. Even the name of the celebration is taken from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, or “first fruits.” 

Continue reading Kwanzaa — a Holiday of Purpose and Principles

Dokhontou: A Seattle Dancer’s Journey

by Rayna Mathis


Amid the unpredictable and ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the performing arts scene is still struggling to survive the impacts of this virus. For many artists, being able to perform to live audiences was critical to their craft. Not just for the financial aspect, but for being able to connect to their community as well. There has been loss and grief, isolation and fear. I’d even venture to say many of us, if not everyone, has at one point reflected on themselves and the world around them during this pandemic. If you were paying attention, how could you not?

Continue reading Dokhontou: A Seattle Dancer’s Journey

Black Stories Matter Too: Five Books to Bolster Your Understanding of Blackness in America

by Bri Little


In this moment of uprising, people are eager to learn about the history of anti-Black violence, particularly in the United States. Many essential reading lists highlight academic and sociological texts as a means of understanding the lives of Black people. Those books are important, absolutely, but to acknowledge Black people as fully human and not merely a cause to fight for, antiracist accomplices should read from the full spectrum of our diasporic experiences. Black stories in themselves are a tool for becoming less racist, as they prove we are not a monolith. Here is a list of books from all genres that illuminates both the history of white violence against Black people and our continued tradition of knowing our worth and celebrating ourselves despite it.

Continue reading Black Stories Matter Too: Five Books to Bolster Your Understanding of Blackness in America