Tag Archives: Anti-Black Racism

What Does it Mean to Be a Black, Muslim, Oromo Girl?

by Fatra Hussein

(This article was originally published on the South End Stories Youth Blog.) 


WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE BLACK?

It means that people hate you for your skin, your Afro hair, your style, for the way you walk, for the way you talk, for the way you live. You are hated for no reason at all. Being Black means seeing those you love gone at the hands of a police officer. Being Black means starting to fight for your justice when you’re only a kid. But being Black also comes with the amazing stuff like strength and beauty and our food. It comes with also learning that our skin color is our armor that protects us, so even if the world hates, we love back. Being Black means when the world pushes you down, you get right back up. It means fighting and never giving up. Being Black means having this amazing power that helps you push through everything the world puts you through. Being Black means seeing the worst but hoping for the best. But most of all, being Black means keeping your head up no matter what and NEVER EVER GIVING UP!!

Continue reading What Does it Mean to Be a Black, Muslim, Oromo Girl?

Was a Robbery in Federal Way the First Hate Crime of the 2020 Election Season?

by Jack Russillo

Content Warning: This article contains graphic descriptions of racist violence.  


Hate crimes are known to peak in election years, especially in the weeks preceding and following the election. In the United States in 2016, the five days with the highest number of reported hate crimes all occurred within a week after the election, according to a study from the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University at San Bernardino.

In Seattle, one-seventh of all hate crimes in 2016 took place in November, more than double the amount from the same month in the previous year, a non-election year. Across the country, the final months of that year saw the highest number of hate crimes since 2008. In the two weeks after Donald Trump’s presidential election, the daily average of hate crimes nearly doubled. No hard figures are available yet for the 2020 election, but the immigrant rights organization America’s Voice tracks documented hate incidents that have occurred since Trump’s election in an online map

“I think that we’re dealing with a number of things, historically, but even more highlighted under the Trump administration,” said Anita Whitfield, King County’s Chief Equity and Inclusion Officer. “Fear of difference, fear of law, fear of perceived position. I think that there is probably a lot more bias-based activity than anybody knows about … in the current environment, it really feels as if there has been an official okay, openly letting people know that they are unwelcome, minimized, or disliked.”

Continue reading Was a Robbery in Federal Way the First Hate Crime of the 2020 Election Season?

YWCA Hosts ‘Week Without Violence’ to Raise Awareness Around Gender-Based Violence Against Black Women

by Elizabeth Turnbull

Editor’s Note: This article covers the topics of racism and gender-based violence. 


On Sunday, Oct. 18, the YWCA of Seattle, King County, and Snohomish began hosting a Week Without Violence to specifically provide resources and raise awareness around the fight to end gender-based violence that Black women and girls face.

While October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month in general, the YWCA’s free programming this week specifically focuses on the unique intersection of gender-based violence  — which includes domestic violence, trafficking, and sexual assault — and racism.

Continue reading YWCA Hosts ‘Week Without Violence’ to Raise Awareness Around Gender-Based Violence Against Black Women

barry johnson Artist Interview: “anything is anything” Can Become Structural Change

by Vivian Hua 華婷婷

(This article first ran in REDEFINE Magazine and appears under a co-publishing agreement.)


Speak to Renton-based visual artist barry johnson for any substantial amount of time, and one quickly understands why his latest catchphrase, “anything is anything,” has become an overarching mantra. As johnson explains, “Because I’m a self-taught artist, [the phrase] gives me freedom …”

“anything is anything” was the title of johnson’s first solo art show at Tacoma’s Alma Mater in August 2019, and is now the title of his weekly podcast on “the origins of myths, idioms, stories, and nonsense.” Both offer tiny glimpses into johnson’s varied interests and atraditional way of moving through traditional art spaces, which has led to an art practice that includes numerous mediums, from painting and architecture to performance and film — all with a focus on Black communities.

Continue reading barry johnson Artist Interview: “anything is anything” Can Become Structural Change