Tag Archives: Arts and Culture

PHOTOS: Attendees share in Japanese culture during Bunka no Hi

By Carolyn Bick

Though she didn’t celebrate Bunka no Hi herself, when she lived in Japan, Arisa Nakamura now celebrates the modern holiday alongside the community and her fellow Japanese Cultural and Community Center staff and volunteers.

This year marked the organization’s 14th annual celebration of Bunka no Hi, which Nakamura said was originally a celebration of the Emperor Meiji’s birthday, changing in 1948 to commemorate the post-WWII Japanese constitution. While it’s still a national holiday in Japan, it’s now about celebrating and sharing Japanese culture and art, she said.

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THE RESIDENCY NEEDS A RESIDENCE

By Neve Kamilah Mazique-Bianco

At An Evening with the Residency Fundraiser at the Paramount Theatre on Sept. 28, Seattle hip hop community, family, and patrons celebrated five years of youth development and empowerment through the Residency, a hip hop program created in 2015 by a collaboration of the Museum of Pop Culture Seattle, Arts Corps, and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, emphasizing the need for all of us to create, remember, love, celebrate and sustain home.

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Q&A: Lady Jay The Musical Poetress Talks New Album, Struggle, and Discovering Herself

by Gus Marshall

Lady Jay The Musical Poetress is a contemporary folklorist and modern day story teller who chooses to communicate her truth through the medium of musical poetry.

Self-reflective poems, unabashed and extremely personal, are front and center on Lady Jay’s new album, The BrainBox. Production that runs the gamut from guitar-heavy arena rock, to neo-soul electronica, lays the groundwork for Lady Jay’s powerful message of self-love, perpetual struggle, and soul-filled resilience. Paired with befitting backing tracks produced by Lady Jay’s husband Allen Hunter (also known as “AFlat”), The BrainBox takes the listener on a theatrical journey.

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Q&A: Because We Are Girls writer and director talks cultural silence and breaking the cycle around abuse

Baljit Sangra is the writer and director of Because We Are Girls, a documentary film about three sisters who suffered sexual assault at the hands of a trusted relative. Sangra talked with the South Seattle Emerald about the making of the film, the difficulties in breaking away from a culture that teaches girls and women that they are lesser than their male counterparts, and how cultural dynamics between older and younger generations play into the narrative.

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Javoen Byrd Drums The Beat of His African Heritage

by George Collins

It’s hard to miss Javoen Byrd as he enters Empire Espresso on Edmunds Street in Columbia City. He sports a cream colored outfit with soft gold balls dangling from the collar, an Aso Yoruba. It’s an outfit I’ve seen him wear several times when tapping his hands on a set of drums in celebration of his African heritage.

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‘Citizen: An American Lyric’ Illustrates the Horror of Being Black in America

The adaptation of Claudia Rankine’s book plays at Sound Theatre through July 28

by Georgia McDade

If you believe the Garden of Eden,  then you accept that life was peaceful, tranquil. If you also believe the Garden was located in Africa, then perhaps you can accept that the Africans lived peaceful, tranquil lives — at least for a time.

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Central Area Home Reimagined as Haven for Black Art, Historic Preservation

by Georgia S. McDade
photos by Susan Fried

Do you remember Jordan’s Drug Store? Have you heard of Bluma’s Deli? Accent on Travel? Liberty Bank? Kirk’s Laundry? Black Arts West? Joy Unlimited? Thompson’s Point of View, Black and Tan, Miss Helen’s Diner? Tiki’s Tavern,? Mardi Gras? Red Apple? The list could be longer, but if you recognize these names, you know they are businesses gone from Seattle’s Central District or CD. Though reasons for their disappearances differ, the word “gentrification” enters conversations often. New buildings, several stories high, often in bright colors, dot the neighborhood. By the time this is printed, a few more landmarks may be gone or going. This is today’s CD.

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