Tag Archives: Arts and Culture

A Guide to Native Art Markets This Winter

by Amanda Ong


This November is Native American Heritage Month, and while the Thanksgiving holiday is rooted in colonizer narratives, Native American Heritage Day (Nov. 25) celebrates diverse Native cultures. As we turn to gift-giving season, a wonderful way to support our Indigenous communities and honor Native American heritage is by buying from Native makers and artists. Read on for a list of Native art markets, both seasonal and ongoing, throughout the Seattle area. 

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Arts in the South End: A November Roundup

by Victor Simoes

“Baby, It’s Cold Outside” (the Glee version, please), but that doesn’t mean you can’t go out and enjoy the events we have curated for South Enders. From film festivals and circus debuts to local jazz and more, the South Seattle November art scene is worth stepping out for.

Check out our list of November arts events below. Know of something that should be on our list? Let us know at Arts@SeattleEmerald.org.

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Kat Lieu’s Subtle Asian Baking Brings Asian Flavors to Your Favorite Sweets

by Amanda Ong


After 13 years as a physical therapist, Renton-based Kat Lieu never expected to become the face and founder of Subtle Asian Baking, a Facebook community dedicated to baking with Asian flavors that has over 150,000 members. Lieu had only started baking in 2017, but when she started the page in light of other popular Facebook pages Subtle Asian Traits and Subtle Asian Cooking, it skyrocketed into a massive community of Asian baking enthusiasts. 

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S.U.B.E. Founder Jeffrey Cheatham Initiates Seattle’s First-Ever Children’s Book Day

by Troy Landrum Jr.


My writing journey began approximately eight years ago — possibly 30-something years, if the journey includes reading memorable books and making up stories in my head through my middle-grade years and adolescence. Specifically during that eight-year span I had the honor of meeting a lot of wonderful people along the way who shared those same hopes of making something out of the stories that floated around in their heads. 

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‘There Should Be Native American Restaurants Everywhere’

Chef Sean Sherman Talks Indigenous Foods and Culinary Revitalization at SPL

by Amanda Ong


This Friday, Nov. 4, Chef Sean Sherman will speak at the Seattle Central Library and online about his work highlighting Indigenous food systems in a modern culinary context. Author of The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen, Sherman is CEO and founder of The Sioux Chef and North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems (NATIFS). Raised in Pine Ridge, South Dakota, Sherman is Oglala Lakota Sioux. The event will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

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Station Space Celebrates Its Future as an Interdisciplinary Arts Hub in King Street Station

Becoming a Central Home for Totem Star, Red Eagle Soaring, The Rhapsody Project, Whipsmart, and Jackson Street Music Program

by Vee Hua 華婷婷


On the border of Pioneer Square and the Chinatown-International District sits King Street Station, a historic train station constructed between 1904 and 1906. Yet prior to colonization and the forced regrading of Seattle, the location was known to local Native American tribes as dzee-dzee-LAH-letch in Lushootseed, or the “little crossing-over place.” It was a tidal marsh — plentiful with flounder — adjacent to Coast Salish longhouses on Yesler Way and surrounded by trails where Native Americans from numerous thougvillages fished and intersected with one another.

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‘BACK HOME’ Wing Luke Exhibit Highlights Black and Brown Solidarity

by Ronnie Estoque


During the 2020 protests against police brutality and amid a global pandemic, local businesses across the city shut their doors down and put up boards to cover their storefronts. The uncertain times gave light to many local artists who decided to use their time and talents to transform boarded-up storefronts with murals. Located on Rainier Avenue, Paradice Avenue Souf, a burgeoning youth-centered Black and Brown artist collective, chose to create a mural to show the importance of multiracial solidarity during times of social unrest. Through a collaboration with the Wing Luke Museum (WLM), their Black and Brown Solidarity mural alongside other art pieces and installations are showcased in their exhibit called “BACK HOME.” 

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PONGO POETRY | Red Black Orange Teal

Pongo Poetry Project’s mission is to engage youth in writing poetry to inspire healing and growth. For over 20 years, Pongo has mentored poetry with youth at the Children & Family Justice Center (CFJC), King County’s juvenile detention facility. Many CFJC residents are Youth of Color who have endured traumatic experiences in the form of abuse, neglect, and exposure to violence. These incidents have been caused and exacerbated by community disinvestment, systemic racism, and other forms of institutional oppression. In collaboration with CFJC staff, Pongo poetry writing offers CFJC youth a vehicle for self-discovery and creative expression that inspires recovery and healing. Through this special bimonthly column in partnership with the South Seattle Emerald, Pongo invites readers to bear witness to the pain, resilience, and creative capacity of youth whose voices and perspectives are too often relegated to the periphery. To learn more about Pongo’s work of inspiring healing and relief in youth coping with mental and emotional turmoil, register for Pongo Poetry Night, its upcoming event at Third Place Books Ravenna


Red Black Orange Teal

by a young person, age 18

My first mask is red
red, my favorite color
I always liked it when I was a kid
Red is like anger
like my attitude most of the time
on the outside at least
On the inside is everything else
how smart I am I guess…
ʼcause I don’t go to school anymore
not since COVID started
but it was easy

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‘That Talk You Do’ Reflects on Tia Naché’s Adolescence in Rainier Valley

by Amanda Ong


From Nov. 4 to Nov 13, White Center’s Acts On Stage will present “That Talk You Do,” the debut one-woman show of Tia Naché Fields-Yarborough. “That Talk You Do” follows Fields-Yarborough through her own life and youth in Seattle as she explores faith, Blackness, and womanhood through song, spoken word, hip-hop, and ’90s R&B.

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