Tag Archives: Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Bystander Training Offered to Seattle, National AAPI Communities

by Kimmy Li

(This article was originally published on the International Examiner and has been reprinted with permission.)


With the recent spike of anti-Asian hate crimes across the country and one-year anniversary of the Atlanta spa shootings in March, some organizations are offering free bystander training and self-defense workshops for the Asian American and Pacific Islander community.

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PHOTO ESSAY: Hundreds of Community Members Celebrate Year of the Tiger in Chinatown

The annual celebration of Lunar New Year held by the Chinatown-International District Business Improvement Area returned to the Chinatown-International District on April 30, bringing tons of excitement to community members after two years of pandemic.

by Debby Cheng


The annual celebration of Lunar New Year hosted by the Chinatown-International District Business Improvement Area (CIDBIA), a celebration that has been traditionally held for decades, returned to the community after two years of pandemic. While last year CIDBIA opted to do a food walk only, this year will be the first Lunar New Year celebration back in-person with the street festival.

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Midnight Supply Company: Making All Your Merch Dreams Come True

by Patheresa Wells


Often our dreams do not take a direct route to fruition. For instance, if we came across our younger selves, we might need to tell a story about how we got to where we are. For Christine Geronimo, owner of Midnight Supply Company, a Filipina woman-owned print shop in South Park, the road to becoming a merch maven started with music. 

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White Center’s 20th Cambodian New Year Festival to Be Celebrated Virtually

by Ronnie Estoque


Cambodian Cultural Alliance of Washington (CCAW) is hosting its 20th annual celebration for the Cambodian New Year — a few weeks after the holiday — via livestream on May 28. Past New Year’s celebrations took place as street festivals in White Center; however, last year was the group’s first virtual celebration due to the pandemic. 

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Hidden Discrimination: Casteism Persists in South Asian Spaces

by Guy Oron

(This article originally appeared on Real Change and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


This past April, thousands across the South Asian diaspora marked Dalit History Month, the birth month of the lawyer and freedom fighter Dr. B. R. Ambedkar. Ambedkar, who was born into the status of “untouchable” (now called Dalit) of the Indian caste system, is known for his efforts to emancipate Dalit communities across South Asia and as the father of the Indian constitution for his role as chair of the drafting committee. His unrelenting advocacy for equality, feminism, and justice makes him a household icon for millions today.

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OPINION: Centering Compassion in Little Saigon

by Mimi To and Jasmine Tran


Hi, our names are Mimi and Jasmine. We are members of the ACRS Civic Engagement Youth Organizing Team. ACRS (Asian Counseling and Referral Service) is a nonprofit founded in Seattle that offers community-based multilingual and multicultural services to the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. We are both Vietnamese American women who care deeply for our community and work to serve its goals.

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Gary Locke Shares His Story as Keynote Speaker at 2021 Eradicate Hate Conference

(This article was originally published on the International Examiner and has been reprinted with permission.)


Former Gov. Gary Locke was the keynote speaker at the October 18, 2021, Eradicate Hate Conference, which gathered hundreds of attendees at the Pittsburgh Convention Center. The event, held on a date close to the anniversary of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh on October 27, 2018, brought together people and organizations from around the world that were having the most significant impact in combating hate, preventing hate crimes, and providing justice for the victims of such crimes. The following is Locke’s speech, printed in the International Examiner with permission.

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Who Keeps Us Safe? | Episode 1: What Does Safety Mean to You?

(Artwork: Tianliang Ning)

Who Keeps Us Safe? is a podcast by Asian Americans living in Seattle that explores safety, policing, and abolition in our communities and beyond. Join us monthly as we speak with organizers in the Seattle area, and reflect on their work and learnings. We hope that our listeners will use this podcast to begin and/or supplement their own conversations about safety and policing in their own communities. This is a project of PARISOL: Pacific Rim Solidarity Network, a grassroots anti-imperialist, anti-capitalist, Hong Konger, Taiwanese, and Chinese* diaspora group based in Seattle. PARISOL is dedicated to local & international solidarity, community building, cultural & politicized learning, abolition, and anti-racist work.


Who Keeps Us Safe? (WKUS) is a podcast by Asian Americans living in Seattle that explores safety, policing, and abolition in our communities and beyond. In each monthly episode, we speak with organizers in the Seattle area, and reflect on their work and learnings. 
In partnership with the South Seattle Emerald and KVRU 105.7FM, WKUS is relaunching a previously recorded podcast each month at the Emerald.

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Remembering Norm Mineta, Asian American Pioneer

by Sharon Maeda


There are so many stories about Norm Mineta, 90, who passed away Tuesday, May 3. He was a soft-spoken gentleman who was a part of making U.S. history at multiple junctures. Mineta was “the first” many times over: the first Asian American mayor of a major city, San Jose, California, where he was born and raised. Twenty years ago, the San Jose Airport was named for him. He was the first Asian American cabinet secretary and first and only Democrat in the George W. Bush administration. 

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