Tag Archives: Black Lives Matter

Photo Essay: Seattle’s Movement for Black Lives

by Tiametta Zoe (words and photos)


I won’t say too much about this photo essay because the photos speak for themselves. I will say that it came from the lens and eyes of a Black woman.

I have always dealt with debilitatingly low self-esteem and a deteriorating self-concept. This has often left me vulnerable to abuse, manipulation, and near-death experiences. Understanding the concept of my beauty and my essence has always been a struggle for me, mainly due to the way society has viewed and treated Black people in general and the traumatic history both my people and I have inherited. This is all being brought to the surface now like never before. I consider myself to be in recovery — learning the concepts of truth, self-love, assertiveness, courage, intuition, and progress. Continue reading Photo Essay: Seattle’s Movement for Black Lives

The Sleep-Walking White Ally

by Jasmine M. Pulido


I filled out a survey asking me if I’ve experienced racism firsthand.

I almost laughed. I replied into the text box, “Where do I even start?” 

I wanted to reply with the shorthand, “TMTM” (“Too Many to Mention”) like you would in high school, but with an entirely different connotation. Instead, I started to list them as succinctly as possible to get a real handle of what this looked like on paper. This was only for experiences at my daughters’ predominantly white school as a parent of color. There are more outside of it (#ManyMore #TooManyToMention).

The survey brought it all up again. 

Continue reading The Sleep-Walking White Ally

“I Was Just Laying on the Ground Screaming”: Protestors Recount Alleged Abuse While In Custody

by Carolyn Bick


Face-down in the gravel, hands cuffed behind her back, Ash could hear herself screaming. She had just been arrested by a group of Seattle Police Department (SPD) officers, who had come speeding across the grass towards a group of protestors at Cal Anderson Park during a Black Lives Matter protest on July 25.

Continue reading “I Was Just Laying on the Ground Screaming”: Protestors Recount Alleged Abuse While In Custody

Dictator and Apprentice: Duterte and Trump

by Cindy Domingo 


Amid the current worldwide pandemic, two presidents — over 8,000 miles apart — seem to have been trained from the same leadership course. Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s State of the Union address delivered on July 27 was filled with rants against his critics and personal grudges against the media. There was no roadmap laid out to lead the country out of the health, political, and economic crisis facing the Filipino people. Issues of unemployment, poverty, and illness went unmentioned while Duterte focused on his drug war and the death penalty. Sound familiar? Unfortunately, this is a painful reminder of President Donald Trump and his lack of leadership in our nation’s time of crisis. 

Both Trump and Duterte initially refused to acknowledge the seriousness of COVID-19, allowing the virus to spread unfettered and leaving governors, mayors, and other local officials to handle the pandemic without the appropriate funding or a unified national strategy. Finally, when the international and domestic pressure became too much to bear and the COVID-19 deaths and illnesses continued to mount, both presidents were forced to act. 

Continue reading Dictator and Apprentice: Duterte and Trump

“Let’s Go Get Our Guns and Shoot ‘Em”: SFD Battalion Chief Allegedly Makes Violent Remark Against Black Lives Matter Marchers in Shoreline

by Carolyn Bick


Tae Phoenix was across the street, but said she heard the words clear as day: “Quick, boys. Let’s go get our guns and shoot ‘em.”

And just like that, Phoenix found herself walking across the street to confront the man — later identified as Seattle Fire Department (SFD) Battalion Chief Alan Cox — who had allegedly made the comment to his two young children, after he learned that the group preparing to march down the block was protesting for Black Lives Matter.

Phoenix said she asked Cox, who was standing in his house’s driveway when he allegedly made the comment, what he thought he was doing, and why he thought it was okay to say something like that, particularly in front of children.

“He seemed a little surprised. … He kind of looked at me with this sort of very condescending sneer … and basically said, ‘Why don’t you just move along, lady?’ And he said, ‘lady’ like it was an insult,” Phoenix said.

Continue reading “Let’s Go Get Our Guns and Shoot ‘Em”: SFD Battalion Chief Allegedly Makes Violent Remark Against Black Lives Matter Marchers in Shoreline

Amid Various Protests and Marches, One Group has been Taking to the Streets Every Day

by Elizabeth Turnbull


Accompanied by at least one light-up tambourine, a few makeshift drums, and as many as two trumpets, a group of roughly 100 protesters marched through the Ravenna neighborhood Thursday night, July 23, chanting, “Every day!” and “Whose lives matter!? Black Lives Matter!”

Consisting of an 8 a.m. march, an afternoon picket, and an evening march, protesters have been taking part in the Everyday March for over a month in a continued effort to get the City to act on their demands. In recent days, the marchers have specifically pushed for defunding the Seattle Police Department (SPD) budget by 50 percent and for those funds to be reallocated to the Black community. Continue reading Amid Various Protests and Marches, One Group has been Taking to the Streets Every Day

Picket and Rally Draws Attention to Ongoing Racism in King County Workplaces, Including Metro

by Elizabeth Turnbull

“In the struggle for Black lives, we must also stand for Black workers.”


Waving signs reading, “King County Stop Union Busting,” and “Racism Is A Threat To Worker Safety,” protesters participated in a picket and rally sponsored by Organized Workers for Labor Solidarity (OWLS) on July 20. Held near the office of King County Executive Dow Constantine,  the rally included protesters demanding an end to racial discrimination in King County workplaces. 

“In the struggle for Black lives, we must also stand for Black workers,” said Anna Hackman, a professor at Seattle Central College and member of the American Federation of Teachers. “This racist, capitalist system that takes our lives at the hands of police is the same one that exploits our land and our resources and our labor.” 

Continue reading Picket and Rally Draws Attention to Ongoing Racism in King County Workplaces, Including Metro

Photo Essay: “Pay The Fee” Gathering Puts Emphasis on Stories of Artists and Small Businesses

by Susan Fried (photos) and Jack Russillo (words)


On July 18, the final Saturday before a statewide prohibition on all live entertainment began, an all day gathering of pop-up food and streetwear vendors, music artists, and interactive art took to the streets directly west of 23rd Avenue South and South Jackson Street. Continue reading Photo Essay: “Pay The Fee” Gathering Puts Emphasis on Stories of Artists and Small Businesses

OPINION: Vote for Kids August 4

by Erin Okuno


With COVID-19 surging, a recession, unemployment in King County at 14%, and the renewed call for justice and equity for BIPOC lives, it’s an important year to pay attention to local as well as national elections. While the country is focused on the November presidential election, Washingtonians would do well to focus on some very consequential local elections coming much sooner. 

Washington State’s 2020 primary election is on August 4. Citizens should focus their efforts on exercising the power of the ballot locally and vote in the primary. Those who are not able to vote can still participate in voter education, support candidates, and help get out the vote. 

Continue reading OPINION: Vote for Kids August 4

I Did Not Know Summer Taylor, But I Know Their Power

by Sarah Stuteville


I did not know Summer Taylor. And Seattle is a small town at its heart, so I knew them the way I sort of know everyone here through a few degrees of separation — a housemate who worked with them at a doggy daycare, a shared neighborhood, the unconfirmed possibility they helped my flea-bitten cat a few months ago.

I did not know Summer Taylor. And the internet is a strange hall of mirrors where we reflect each other in tricky ways that can feel like “knowing.” Summer jokes about parkour in a grainy video, smiles gleefully up to the left corner of our phone screens and dances the Cupid Shuffle on I-5 free of the terrible knowledge we viewers hold — that there is a car speeding toward them just a few minutes out of frame. 

Continue reading I Did Not Know Summer Taylor, But I Know Their Power