Tag Archives: Bruce Harrell

NEWS GLEAMS: Harrell Announces Transition Team, Free Vaccines for Children, & More!

curated by Emerald Staff

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!


✨Gleaming This Week✨

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS: Harrell Announces Transition Team, Free Vaccines for Children, & More!

Seattle and King County General Election Results

by Nathalie Graham, Agueda Pacheco Flores, Ashley Archibald, Chetanya Robinson, Marcus Green


Editors’ Note: We will continue to update this article with election updates in the coming days.

Seattle voters appeared to be embracing moderate candidates in key races for mayor, city attorney and City Council, according to early returns Tuesday night.

Updated results as of 11/04/2021

Seattle Mayor’s Race

Update 11/05/2021, 1:00 p.m.:

Lorena González conceded the mayor’s race, making Bruce Harrell Seattle’s next mayor.

She tweeted her concession Thursday after election results showed Harrell leading González 62% to 38% with just under 33% of ballots counted.

“With today’s ballot drop, it’s clear that Bruce Harrell will be the next Mayor of Seattle,” she said on @MLorenaGonzalez “Earlier, I called him to congratulate him on a hard-fought race and wished him much luck in his efforts to make progress on the challenges Seattle faces.”

Update 11/04/2021, 4:00 p.m.:

With just under 33% of ballots counted, Bruce Harrell leads Lorena González 62% to 38%.

Bruce Harrell was leading Lorena González 65% to 35% in a race to elect Seattle’s next mayor and potentially set the course on homelessness, policing, affordable housing, and other critical issues facing the city.

Seattle voters found themselves in a similar position Tuesday night to election nights past: Should the electorate choose a moderate Democrat or a progressive to steer the city? 

Continue reading Seattle and King County General Election Results

OPINION: It’s Possible to Both Stand Up for Survivors and Against Racism

by M. Anthony Davis


It’s okay for two things to be true at the same time. We don’t have to conflate topics. We can recognize nuances within conversations, and even split topics and have multiple discussions simultaneously. Seattle mayoral candidate M. Lorena González has every right to question Bruce Harrell’s stance on sexual abuse, which she has done in debates. 

She has the right to question statements Harrell made in support of former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray who had been accused of sexual abuse by multiple victims. While these statements are true, they do not excuse the use of racially charged tropes in a campaign ad. And while it is our duty to stand up for victims of sexual abuse, it is also our duty to take a hard stand against racism. 

Continue reading OPINION: It’s Possible to Both Stand Up for Survivors and Against Racism

Mayoral Candidates Spar on Public Safety, Being ‘From Here’

by Erica C. Barnett & Paul Kiefer

(This article originally appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


Seattle Mayoral candidates Lorena González and Bruce Harrell faced off once again on Sunday during a public safety-focused forum hosted by the ACLU of Washington and moderated by Sean Goode, the director of the Seattle-area youth diversion nonprofit Choose 180.

The forum was a chance for the two candidates to get into the weeds on issues like police oversight, union contracts, and the logistics of civilian emergency response.

But anyone looking for detailed, specific responses to questions about these issues — not to mention the City’s use of the King County Detention Center, plans to increase or decrease Seattle Police Department (SPD) funding, and under what circumstances police should use lethal force — might have come away disappointed.

Continue reading Mayoral Candidates Spar on Public Safety, Being ‘From Here’

The 2021 Seattle Mayor’s Race by the Numbers

by Erica C. Barnett


With just over a month to go before the 2021 Seattle mayoral election, both Lorena González and Bruce Harrell have amassed financial support worth well over a million dollars, including both direct contributions (which are capped at $550) and independent expenditures (which are unlimited). But a closer look at campaign contributions and expenditures reveals key differences between the candidates’ supporters and how they’re spending their campaign funds.

Continue reading The 2021 Seattle Mayor’s Race by the Numbers

37th District Dems Endorse Thomas-Kennedy for City Attorney, No Mayoral Endorsement

by Emerald staff


In a marathon session, more than 100 37th District Democrats met for nearly five hours on Zoom on the evening of Monday, Sept. 13, to make the organization’s general election endorsements. Endorsements require a 60% majority and included:

Continue reading 37th District Dems Endorse Thomas-Kennedy for City Attorney, No Mayoral Endorsement

‘Compassion Seattle’ Charter Amendment Won’t Appear On November Ballot

by Erica C. Barnett

(This article originally appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


The Washington State Court of Appeals denied the Compassion Seattle campaign’s appeal of a lower-court ruling striking down their proposed Seattle charter amendment on homelessness this morning, and the measure will not appear on the November ballot.

In its ruling, the appeals court did not give any specific reason for denying the campaign’s appeal, which it filed on Tuesday after strongly suggesting it would not do so following last week’s King County Superior Court ruling. Knoll Lowney, an attorney for a coalition of groups opposing the measure, told PubliCola this week that he expected to prevail, in part because Compassion Seattle “appealed without coming up with any appellate arguments.” Instead, the campaign’s appeal relied on the same arguments it made in its initial response to the lawsuit against the initiative.

Continue reading ‘Compassion Seattle’ Charter Amendment Won’t Appear On November Ballot

Harrell Says He’ll Implement Key Provisions of ‘Compassion Seattle’ Measure, Clear Encampments

by Erica C. Barnett

(This article originally appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


At a press conference a few hundred yards from an encampment in Woodland Park on the morning of Thursday, Sept. 2, mayoral candidate Bruce Harrell said that if elected, he would implement the key elements of Charter Amendment 29 — the “Compassion Seattle” ballot measure. A King County Superior Court judge tossed the initiative last week, agreeing with opponents that things like budgets and land-use policy are outside the scope of local ballot measures, but the campaign appealed to the Washington State Court of Appeals, whose ruling could come tomorrow.

Harrell’s “Homelessness Action Plan” would require the City to spend 12% of its general fund on homelessness, build 2,000 new emergency housing (shelter) beds within one year, create individualized “service plans” for every person experiencing homelessness, and, as Harrell put it, “ensure that our city parks, playgrounds, sports fields, public spaces, sidewalks, and streets remain open and clear of encampments.” These proposals are all identical to provisions of Charter Amendment 29, which Harrell supported.

At Thursday’s event, which was billed as a press conference but resembled a campaign rally, Harrell fielded questions primarily from a large group of supporters rather than the assembled press. “If and when you become mayor, how soon can we as Green Lake citizens expect to see these encampments gone?” one supporter asked. “I will say January or February, because I work with a sense of urgency,” Harrell responded.

Another asked how he’d respond to critics who say that his plan would mean sweeping encampments without providing services. “Look at my record,” Harrell responded. “There are no dog whistles. I don’t have a dog whistle. And I say, how dare people say that, when my wife and I’ve been doing this for 20, 30 years.”

Continue reading Harrell Says He’ll Implement Key Provisions of ‘Compassion Seattle’ Measure, Clear Encampments

OPINION: Political Intermission

by Lola E. Peters


Act One was the campaign. We met the players, learned their public backstories, got hints about their character, and were introduced to the context of their stories. Act Two was the primary: a much shorter period where we learned about ourselves. Through social media, on Zoom calls, and over outdoor happy hour snacks we asked, “Who are you voting for?” or “Can you believe so-and-so is voting for so-and-so?” The end of Act Two revealed who were the players representing minor, though no less important, voices but no longer primary participants in the current play. We also learned whose dramatic arcs would move forward to the next act. 

Here I sit, in the lobby, looking around at my fellow voters, wondering what they were thinking. 

Continue reading OPINION: Political Intermission

March to ‘Protect Public Spaces’ Meets Anti-Sweep Protest at City Hall Camp

by Hannah Krieg

(This article was originally published by Real Change News and has been reprinted under an agreement.) 


On the morning of Wednesday, Aug. 11, two residents of the City Hall Park encampment gingerly pulled their belongings out of what was among the site’s last remaining tents. In and out of the tent, they emerged with blankets, a pink backpack, a shopping bag — things that made up their home in the park at the foot of the 14-level King County Courthouse.

One of the residents borrowed a lighter from a couple on a nearby bench. They talked like neighbors.

Behind them, a Seattle Parks and Recreation truck was parked and appeared to be hauling away garbage. One of the residents asked a worker in a vest a question that was ignored.

Continue reading March to ‘Protect Public Spaces’ Meets Anti-Sweep Protest at City Hall Camp