Tag Archives: Central District

Lisa Myers Bulmash: the DNA and Soul of Black Art in Seattle

by Lisa Edge


In Lisa Myers Bulmash’s home, a new item commemorates her contest winner status — a cerulean pageant sash. The phrase “Miss Thang 2021” is written across it, and a rhinestone-encrusted safety pin ensures it stays in place. Bulmash can’t help but laugh when she talks about her husband’s playful gift. 

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The Morning Update Show — 4/12/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Monday, April 12

LIVE — King County Executive Constantine | Shooting in CD leaves 4 injured | Amazon planning warehouse in Mount Baker | Derek Chauvin Trial Update | Seattle City Council Weekly Outlook | Virginia Police Officer after traffic stop of Black Army Officer

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OPINION: Seattle Activists’ Continued Fight for Mutual Aid, True Equity, and Defunding SPD

by Luna Reyna


One-quarter of the entire 2020 Seattle city budget was allocated to the Seattle Police Department (SPD). While last summer’s protests over anti-Black police violence and calls to defund the police resulted in an 18% decrease in the 2021 SPD budget, $364 million was still allocated to SPD. This is an affront to community-led organizations like King County Equity Now (KCEN) and so many others who have been providing much-needed community support and succeeding in creating real public safety

KCEN, which started as an informal coalition of over 60 Black-led community organizations like Africatown Community Landtrust, Community Passageways, and Blaq Elephant Party, is now a formal, pro-Black 501(c)(4) dedicated to achieving equity for all Black peoples across all measurable metrics, including, wealth, health, land ownership, safety, college matriculation rates, organizational control, and more. 

In the ’70s, the Central District’s population was 75% Black, but as a result of Seattle’s tech boom and resulting gentrification, the CD is now only 15% Black. 

“My family was gentrified from the Central District in 2003,” said TraeAnna Holiday, an organizer with KCEN. “I remember wondering why my family couldn’t stay in our neighborhood. This was our neighborhood; I knew it in and out.” 

Continue reading OPINION: Seattle Activists’ Continued Fight for Mutual Aid, True Equity, and Defunding SPD

NEWS GLEAMS: Vaccine Updates, Calls for Artists, Earth Day Zoom Rally, and More!

curated by Emerald Staff

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle! 


Vaccines: Here’s the Latest — UPDATED 4/7 @ 11:30 a.m.

This Week, the City Will Vaccinate a Record 30K People — The City of Seattle will administer approximately 30,000 vaccines across multiple sites this week including Lumen Field Event Center, the Rainier Beach and West Seattle Community Vaccination Hubs, and via Seattle Fire Department Mobile Vaccination Teams (MVTs), which will visit locations where formerly homeless adults live in permanent supportive housing. The MVTs will also administer second-dose shots to older adults living in affordable housing.

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Help Save the Historic Cherry Street Mosque Building, a Hub for Interfaith and Arts Community

by Mark Van Streefkerk


The Cherry Street Mosque (CSM) building has been a hub of progressive, interfaith community in the Central District for decades. In-person services and events stopped last year due to the pandemic, but several faith-based and arts communities launched a fundraiser last fall to make necessary repairs to the 90-year-old building. Members of the newly formed Cherry Street Village have a vision to turn the building into an interfaith and arts space that will truly be one of a kind in Seattle — but first, the roof has to be fixed. 

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INTENTIONALIST: Where to Grab a Slice in Seattle on Pi Day

by Kristina Rivera


Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters

March 14 is Pi Day, and at Intentionalist, we firmly believe the world would be a better place if all math were accompanied by dessert. 

The first Pi Day (also Einstein’s birthday) was celebrated by physicist Larry Shaw in 1988 because the date, 3/14, represents the first three digits of the famous number pi π, a mathematical constant whose decimal form never ends or becomes repetitive. Shaw rang in the first holiday at the Exploratorium, an interactive science museum in San Francisco, where festivities included a circular parade and the enjoyment of fruit pies.

In 2009, the House of Representatives passed legislation for Pi Day to officially become a holiday, and local restaurants and bakeries alike have been ins-pie-red to celebrate it ever since.

Black History Today: Kisa Hendrickson, a Voice for Those Who Would Be Kept Voiceless

by Marcus Harden

(Black History Today is published in collaboration with Rise up for Students.)


“Listen, if you choose to believe nothing else that transpires here, believe this: your body does not have a soul; your soul has a body, and souls never, ever die.”

—Bernice L. McFadden

Continue reading Black History Today: Kisa Hendrickson, a Voice for Those Who Would Be Kept Voiceless

Black History Today: Janiece ‘Grandma’ Jackson, Supplying Endless Love to Seattle’s Central District

by Marcus Harden

(Black History Today is published in collaboration with Rise up for Students.)


“To acknowledge our ancestors means we are aware that we did not make ourselves, that the line stretches all the way back, perhaps to God; or to Gods. We remember them because it is an easy thing to forget: that we are not the first to suffer, rebel, fight, love and die. The grace with which we embrace life, in spite of the pain, the sorrow, is always a measure of what has gone before.”

—Alice Walker

Continue reading Black History Today: Janiece ‘Grandma’ Jackson, Supplying Endless Love to Seattle’s Central District

Bill To Replace ‘Driving While Poor’ Law Moves Through State Senate

by Jack Russillo


A bill that could reduce Washington’s most commonly-charged crime is making its way through the state Senate.

The bill would provide relief and opportunity to thousands of residents who have been impacted by the state’s driver’s license suspension policies. “Driving While License Suspended in the Third Degree,” or DWLS3, is the least serious crime for driving with a suspended license. The misdemeanor can be charged in a variety of contexts. The most common occurs when a driver receives a ticket for a moving violation, but does not follow through by paying the ticket or showing up in court to contest it. DWSL3 is the state’s most frequently-charged offense, affecting tens of thousands of residents every year solely for not paying a citation.

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Estelita’s Library Moves Into a New Central District Location

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Estelita’s Library, Beacon Hill’s beloved justice-focused bookstore, library, and community hub, is moving into a brand new building on Martin Luther King Jr. Way South in the Central District. The move is made possible through a pilot project by the City of Seattle Office of Arts and Culture called Tiny Cultural Spaces. The project seeks to transfer unused plots of city-owned land to arts and culture organizations. The move marks a new chapter for Estelita’s, a beacon for activism, learning, and joy in the South End.

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