Tag Archives: Central District

The Morning Update Show — 1/12/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, and whereweconverge.com.

We’ll also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Tuesday, Jan. 12

LIVE — Seattle Mayoral Candidate Andrew Grant Houston | Jayapal Gets COVID as Others Refuse to Wear Masks | More Fallout From Capitol Riots | Amazon Fresh to Open Up in the Central District | Police Accountability Hits the State Legislature | City Rolls Out $2.17M COVID Relief for Hospitality Workers

Continue reading The Morning Update Show — 1/12/21

‘Black and Center’ Holiday Gift and Giving Guide!

by Jasmine J. Mahmoud


Before the pandemic, my two favorite places to shop for holiday gifts were Kinokuniya Seattle and Pike Place Market. At Kinokuniya, the bright, densely-packed Japanese bookstore in Uwajimaya Village, I browsed children’s books, comics, magazines, and stationery for hours. At Pike Place Market, I beelined to the Herban Farm stand, founded by Ras Levi Peynado, a Seattleite with Jamaican Roots who farms and dries his products. There, I would test-smell the fragrant seasonings, rubs, and salves, while staring at ferry boats crossing Elliott Bay, before buying gifts for family members. Among favorites were Pike Place Herbs (an all purpose seasoning), the paprika-rich Seatown Smoke (“BBQ in a jar”), and the floral Lavender Sea Salt.

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Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture Launches Cultural PDA to Preserve Cultural Space and Strengthen Communities of Color

by Andrew Engelson


After three and a half years of collaboration between community organizations and the City of Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture (ARTS), Mayor Jenny Durkan today signed legislation creating the Cultural Space Agency Public Development Authority (PDA). This one-of-a-kind organization will be tasked with purchasing land and real estate to provide affordable spaces for the city’s creative, artistic, and cultural communities — especially in communities of color.

Continue reading Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture Launches Cultural PDA to Preserve Cultural Space and Strengthen Communities of Color

Cortona Cafe Will Close at the End of November, to Be Replaced by Melo Cafe

by Jack Russillo


When Isolynn “Ice” Dean, the owner of the Central District’s Cortona Cafe, made the decision to close her coffee shop, she wanted the space to continue to be a hub for the community even after she locks the doors for the final time on November 29.

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OPINION: Segregated Seattle — How Our Racist and Exclusionary Past Has Shaped Our Present

by Alycia Ramirez


Looking back through the last five months of current events and daily protests in Seattle, one might think that the wheels have finally come off. However, the truth is that Seattle has a long and deep history of racism, white supremacy, police brutality, and protesting that goes back to the city’s founding. 

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Chukundi Salisbury Wants to Bring a ‘Wealth of Real-World Knowledge and Lived Experience’ to Olympia

 by Emerald Staff 


Organizer, promoter, entrepreneur, computer scientist, father, and community gardener — Chukundi Salisbury has amassed several titles since moving to Seattle as a 5-year-old boy in 1975. He’s looking to add at least one more come November: state representative for Washington’s 37th Legislative District. 

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Ownership of Three Central District Properties Is Being Transferred From the City of Seattle to Community Organizations

by Jack Russillo


The City of Seattle is finally making some real investments in its communities of color. Last week, the City published plans to transfer ownership of three properties in Seattle’s Central District to Black-led community organizations.

On Monday, the Seattle City Council voted to officially transfer ownership of Seattle’s old Fire Station 23 to Byrd Barr Place, an organization that has offered financial, food, and housing assistance in the area since 1964. Byrd Barr Place has been operating out of the building, located on the 700 block of 18th Avenue East, since it started leasing the property in 1967.

The former Fire Station 6, on the corner of 23rd Avenue South and East Yesler Way, is also being transferred to the Africatown Community Land Trust (ACLT) in the form of a 99-year lease before permanent ownership is made official, a press release from the Mayor’s office announced last week. Since 2012, ACLT has been working to acquire the property to “acquire, develop, and steward land in Greater Seattle to empower and preserve the Black Diaspora community.”

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Women of the Diaspora Helps Bring Much-Needed School Supplies to South End Students

by M. Anthony Davis


Women of the Diaspora (WOD) is a new collective working to empower individual and grassroots support of Black and Brown communities. The five women responsible for the formation of this collaborative came together during this summer’s protests in Seattle sparked by the death of George Floyd. 

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Bold as Love: Celebrating Jimi Hendrix’s Life 50 Years After His Death

by Elizabeth Turnbull

On Friday, exactly 50 years after Jimi Hendrix’s death, a group of roughly 100 people withstood smokey skies and rain to celebrate Hendrix’s life by listening to live music and watching as his image emerged from the paint strokes of roughly 20 local artists. 

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