Tag Archives: CHOP

Celebrations on Capitol Hill and Continued BLM Protests After Election Results

by Elizabeth Turnbull


Dancing, forceful chants, and a plethora of honking cars marked the morning of Saturday, Nov. 7 as Seattleites on Capitol Hill celebrated the start of a new American era following the announcement of a Biden victory and the election of the first Woman of Color as vice president. The monumental day was also an occasion for continued protests for BLM marchers across town. The day’s combination of revelry and activism took a dark turn in the evening, however, with a fatal shooting in the early hours on Sunday.

Continue reading Celebrations on Capitol Hill and Continued BLM Protests After Election Results

Marshall Law Band’s Debut Album ‘12th and Pine’ Examines Leadership and Responsibility After a Summer of Protest

by M. Anthony Davis


I once read an article by Larry Mizell, Jr. where he quoted some famous guy who said “great music is often sparked by a revolution.” As I listened to “12th and Pine,” the new Marshall Law Band album that was birthed from the summer protests in Seattle, those words reverberated in my head. This album, the latest creation of the band that garnered national media attention during a six-day residency playing the soundtrack to protests outside of the East Precinct in Capitol Hill, was literally conceptualized, written, and recorded during the protests.

Continue reading Marshall Law Band’s Debut Album ‘12th and Pine’ Examines Leadership and Responsibility After a Summer of Protest

Seattle Protests Stand at 150 Days and Counting

by Elizabeth Turnbull 


On Monday night, the cold streets surrounding Westlake Park transformed into an echo chamber of drum beats, footsteps, and chants of “No good cops in a racist system! No bad protesters in a revolution!” as roughly 500 protesters marched to where the protests began in Seattle roughly 150 days before. 

After an anticipatory drumroll, several protesters stood up on the park’s stage and unfurled a banner that read, “You Can’t Stop This Revolution” on one side and “Montgomery Bus Boycott: 381 Days, Seattle BLM Protests: 150 Days” on the other.

Continue reading Seattle Protests Stand at 150 Days and Counting

The Morning Update Show — 10/20/20

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We’ll also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Tuesday, October 20

Today on the Morning Update Show:

Black Voices Matter – SABJ Event; Chief Best lands new role at KING 5; Durkan to cut $30M Equity Fund; People’s Budget vs. Solidarity Budget; Diddy launches new political party; and Stimulus Watch.

The Morning Update Show — 10/19/20

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We’ll also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Monday, October 19

Today on the Morning Update Show:

**Live Julie C** — What is the Solidarity Budget?; Ballot Box Safety — King County Elections; WA State foster children being shipped out of state; More discrepancies in the KCSO shooting of Tommy Le; CHOP lawsuit against the City of Seattle; and City Council members being blamed for graffiti at Mayor Durkan’s home.

OPINION: SPOG Head and the SPD are Waging an Old Propaganda War Against Protestors and the Left to Thwart Accountability

by Alycia Ramirez


Since the death of George Floyd under the knee of a police officer, there have been continuous protests resulting in the nation finally realizing the racial inequities baked into our justice system — especially in law enforcement. Even here in our own Emerald City, white Seattleites are now beginning to see what Black and Brown communities have been pointing out for decades: police brutalize people of color with impunity, and often without consequence, and we throw hundreds of millions of dollars at “arresting away” crime instead of investing those funds back into communities.

Continue reading OPINION: SPOG Head and the SPD are Waging an Old Propaganda War Against Protestors and the Left to Thwart Accountability

I Did Not Know Summer Taylor, But I Know Their Power

by Sarah Stuteville


I did not know Summer Taylor. And Seattle is a small town at its heart, so I knew them the way I sort of know everyone here through a few degrees of separation — a housemate who worked with them at a doggy daycare, a shared neighborhood, the unconfirmed possibility they helped my flea-bitten cat a few months ago.

I did not know Summer Taylor. And the internet is a strange hall of mirrors where we reflect each other in tricky ways that can feel like “knowing.” Summer jokes about parkour in a grainy video, smiles gleefully up to the left corner of our phone screens and dances the Cupid Shuffle on I-5 free of the terrible knowledge we viewers hold — that there is a car speeding toward them just a few minutes out of frame. 

Continue reading I Did Not Know Summer Taylor, But I Know Their Power

Reflecting on CHOP: Resistance Between Memory and Imagination

Reflecting on CHOP, one Seattleite says we should sift our memories and “speak of it in terms of a sacrament and not a eulogy.”

by Matthew Bennett


At the beginning, you could walk right up to the intersection at 11th Avenue & Pine Street.

I had to check again, but it was early June when the police stopped a march for George Floyd and others at that intersection by the East Precinct. The protest occupying part of Capitol Hill swelled and shrank with the setting of the sun and the waves of tear gas. When the police abandoned the East Precinct on June 8, organically (so they claim), the protest grew to occupy both the park and about six city blocks. The first infrastructure arrived as relief tents for food and water and medics. The first protest art came with the rattling of spray cans. After what many feared was attempted vehicular homicide (an entirely reasonable fear), the protesters dug in further and erected barriers for safety. My first recollection of the name Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone is seeing it scrawled in marker on a road barrier. Continue reading Reflecting on CHOP: Resistance Between Memory and Imagination

FBI Says There Was Specific Threat Against East Precinct; Durkan Letter Dodges Protesters’ Three Demands

by Erica C. Barnett 

(This article originally appeared on The C is for Crank and has been reprinted under an agreement.) 


Monday morning, city council president Lorena González and public safety committee chair Lisa Herbold said they were both briefed last week by police chief Carmen Best on what the chief had previously described as “credible threats” to the Seattle Police Department East Precinct in early June, and that the chief described the threats as generalized threats to government buildings in cities up and down the West Coast rather than a specific threat to bomb, burn down, or otherwise damage the East Precinct. Best cited the alleged threats in June as one of the reasons police needed to keep protesters away from the building using tear gas, pepper spray, and eventually physical barricades in the area that became known as the CHOP.

Continue reading FBI Says There Was Specific Threat Against East Precinct; Durkan Letter Dodges Protesters’ Three Demands

OPINION: CHOP Not the Beginning, and it’s Not the End

by Seattle Black Collective Voice


A man had been murdered by the police. A heartbreaking video of the killing had made it to the internet. Thousands watched as a policeman kneeled on George Floyd’s neck, while Mr. Floyd begged for his life in vain.  

Like protesters across the country, Seattle took a stand against police brutality only to experience more police brutality firsthand. Even non-protesters were harmed by the Seattle Police Department’s (SPD) negligence. On Capitol Hill, tear gas entered people’s homes and businesses, and the police did not care. 

SPD voluntarily abandoned Capitol Hill’s East Precinct, and the neighborhood tone changed to one of collaboration. In a city physically divided by wealth and class, people came together around a common goal: ending police violence against the Black community.

Continue reading OPINION: CHOP Not the Beginning, and it’s Not the End