Tag Archives: CID

With Contentious Shelter Plans Canceled, CID Residents Organize Their Own Safety Solutions

by Amanda Ong


In September, King County announced plans to build a new shelter for the unhoused in SoDo, near the CID. The plan was highly controversial as there had been little to no outreach from the County to the CID about the proposal before the plan was announced. The County even seemed to avoid community input by scheduling public hearings during weekday work hours, preventing attendance from many working residents. 

Continue reading With Contentious Shelter Plans Canceled, CID Residents Organize Their Own Safety Solutions

OPINION | King County’s Lack of Outreach on CID/SoDo Shelter Complex Is Systemic Racism

by Tanya Woo


Residents and business owners of the Chinatown-International District (CID) are just now hearing about a $66.5 million, 6.8-acre project to expand and enhance a shelter that will house over 500 people with support for 50 RVs and a 50-home tiny house village. It was approved by the King County Council in partnership with Seattle and the King County Regional Homeless Authority. For a complex that opens this fall, these decisions were made without any meaningful community outreach or engagement. This follows a long history of policies that have been forced on the CID with no engagement or outreach. This is systemic racism.

Continue reading OPINION | King County’s Lack of Outreach on CID/SoDo Shelter Complex Is Systemic Racism

OPINION: Mayor Bruce Harrell Starts His Own Legacy of Stop-and-Frisk Policing in Seattle

by Johnny Mao


For many in today’s Little Saigon and Chinatown-International District (CID) if you are hanging out in front of a building, sitting on benches, or at a bus stop — the police can stop and search you with a “stop and frisk.” 

Continue reading OPINION: Mayor Bruce Harrell Starts His Own Legacy of Stop-and-Frisk Policing in Seattle

Former INS Building, Now Largest Seattle Artist Enclave, at Risk of Redevelopment

by Amanda Ong


The former Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) Building in the CID has lived many lives: It was built in 1932 to detain and deport Chinese immigrants during the Chinese Exclusion Act era. It held Japanese American men before they were sent to local incarceration camps during World War II. It deported thousands of immigrants and refugees throughout the 20th century, and naturalized others. And after it was vacated as an INS building in 2004, it lived again as the home of Inscape Arts. With over 125 tenants, Inscape offers the largest working arts and creative space in Seattle. 

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OPINION: Sticks & Stones Won’t Break Luxury Homes, but the CID Will Keep Protesting Them

by Madelyn Tanabe


Blinding sunlight streamed through my curtains as I opened up my computer and logged onto Zoom. Expecting a casual planning meeting for a racial justice club I run with a couple of friends, I got comfortable at my desk and made sure my cup of tea was within reach. Conversations about future plans quickly morphed into something deeper concerning current events in Seattle. The news in early 2021 was filled with stories of hate crimes, but my friends and I knew that anti-Asian oppression is more than just violence. As the now-setting sun cast shadows across my room, we discussed historic redlining, housing discrimination, language discrimination, and more. I drained my tea and my best friend mentioned connecting to mutual aid and local organizers for an upcoming meeting.

Continue reading OPINION: Sticks & Stones Won’t Break Luxury Homes, but the CID Will Keep Protesting Them

The Morning Update Show — 6/28/21

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Monday, June 28

It Is Too Damn HOT! | #TakingBlackPride Recap | More Gun Violence, More Murders | CID Protests Against Luxury High-Rise | Chauvin Sentenced

Continue reading The Morning Update Show — 6/28/21

Community Groups Protest Grand Opening of CID’s First Luxury High-Rise

by Sharon Ho Chang


A coalition of community groups protested the grand opening of KODA Condominiums in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District (CID) yesterday. The demonstration, organized by the CID Coalition (aka Humbows Not Hotels) and supported by Parisol (Pacific Rim Solidarity Network) and MPOP (Massage Parlor Outreach Project), was the latest of many actions over the years protesting the development including a protest at the groundbreaking in 2019.

“KODA was the first luxury high-rise approved in the CID after City Council’s controversial Mandatory Housing Affordability legislation, so it has serious implications for the future of the neighborhood,” wrote CID Coalition member Nina Wallace in an email.

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‘Our Stories Are Your Stories’ Video Collection Celebrates AAPI Heritage

by Mark Van Streefkerk


A video storytelling campaign was launched at the beginning of this month to celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) heritage. “Our Stories Are Your Stories” (OSAYS) is a growing video collection of short oral histories from AAPI people of all walks of life in the greater Seattle area. Coinciding with AAPI Heritage Month, another goal of OSAYS is to help dispel harmful misconceptions about these diverse communities and create empathy as a response to the disturbing trend of anti-Asian violence and xenophobia. 

Notable Seattle athletes, artists, actors, and community leaders like Doug Baldwin, Dr. Vin Gupta, Hollis Wong-Wear, Gary Locke, Lana Condor, Yuji Okumoto, Lauren Tran, and more have kicked off the campaign by contributing their stories — and OSAYS expects more to come. The oral histories don’t have strict guidelines but primarily explore the questions, “What does it mean to be Asian American or Pacific Islander?” and “How does identity inform your life?” Anyone from the AAPI community is encouraged to contribute. The OSAYS videos will become part of the Wing Luke Museum’s oral history archives. 

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INTENTIONALIST: Where to Grab a Slice in Seattle on Pi Day

by Kristina Rivera


Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters

March 14 is Pi Day, and at Intentionalist, we firmly believe the world would be a better place if all math were accompanied by dessert. 

The first Pi Day (also Einstein’s birthday) was celebrated by physicist Larry Shaw in 1988 because the date, 3/14, represents the first three digits of the famous number pi π, a mathematical constant whose decimal form never ends or becomes repetitive. Shaw rang in the first holiday at the Exploratorium, an interactive science museum in San Francisco, where festivities included a circular parade and the enjoyment of fruit pies.

In 2009, the House of Representatives passed legislation for Pi Day to officially become a holiday, and local restaurants and bakeries alike have been ins-pie-red to celebrate it ever since.

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Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic: A Glimpse Back May Offer a Path Forward

by Beverly Aarons


The World Health Organization (WHO) ranked the United States 37th in overall quality of healthcare, right behind Dominica, Denmark, and Chile, but way behind our northern neighbor Canada, which ranked 27th, and our European ally, France, which ranked number 1. More babies per capita die (5.9 per 1000 births) within days (or weeks) of being born in the United States than in Iceland, Finland, and Japan combined. In Seattle, there are persistent racial disparities in healthcare – 6.9 Black babies die per 1,000 births compared to 4.3 deaths per 1,000 white babies born, and gaining access to quality healthcare informed by facts, not racist controlling narratives, is almost impossible. In a recent survey of medical students, 50% believed that Blacks experienced less pain than whites because of biological differences.

Black physicians are less likely to hold these kinds of biases, but there are only 45,534 active physicians identified as Black in the United States compared to 516,304 white physicians, 157,025 Asian physicians, and 53,526 Hispanic physicians, so finding a Black physician or medical institution operating with an anti-racist lens might be impossible for most of the 46 million Blacks in America. This is why Dr. Ben Danielson’s resignation as the medical director of the Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic is so significant to Seattle’s Black community. 

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