Tag Archives: Community Safety Initiative

Local Groups Focus on Safety Today to Ensure Community Dreams Thrive Tomorrow

by Rosette Royale

Everyone lost to gun violence is someone’s beloved.  Beloved is a multi-media campaign exploring gun violence in-depth in four phases: The Problem of gun violence as a symptom of illness (or infection) caused by systemic inequality; The History of gun violence, root causes, and local and national data trends. The Solutions to end gun violence including King County Public Health’s regional approach to gun violence prevention and treatments; and finally, the ideation of a world without gun violence, The Beloved Community. The Beloved project is brought to you in partnership with Seattle Office of Arts & Culture Hope Corps program, King County’s Public Health team, Converge Media, Black Coffee Northwest, Toybox Consulting, Creative Justice, The Facts Newspaper, Forever Safe Spaces, Northwest African American Museum, Presidential Media, and the South Seattle Emerald.


As a child, Tia Yarbrough dreamed that when she grew up, she would help young people — but she never imagined her dream would lead her back to the place where she’d spent hours of her childhood.

Continue reading Local Groups Focus on Safety Today to Ensure Community Dreams Thrive Tomorrow

OPINION: Gun Violence Is a Symptom of Poverty

by Tammy Morales


When it comes to addressing gun violence in our community, it’s time to put our money where our mouth is. Organizations like Safe Passage, Boys & Girls Club’s SE Network, Rainier Beach Action Coalition (RBAC), and Urban Family invest time in our communities, support our young people, and build community. They have been doing essential work long before Omari Wallace was shot and killed on March 18. In fact, we were supposed to be having a Zoom meeting about the increase of South Seattle shootings when we learned that a young man walked into the Emerald City Bible Fellowship and shot 19-year-old Wallace who was there attending a meeting. 

Continue reading OPINION: Gun Violence Is a Symptom of Poverty