Tag Archives: Community

Detective Cookie Chess Park Opens in Rainier Beach Amid Community Love and Celebration

by Phil Manzano


The Detective Cookie Chess Park had its grand opening on a resplendent Saturday afternoon as community members, neighborhood activists, and government officials celebrated what likely was Seattle’s feel-good story of the weekend.

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Africatown Celebrates the Opening of the William Grose Center for Cultural Innovation

by Lauryn Bray


The Africatown Community Land Trust (ACLT) ribbon-cutting ceremony on Sept. 16 marked the end of a week of events celebrating the opening of the William Grose Center for Cultural Innovation. Under the legacy of William Grose, ACLT transforms the decommissioned Fire Station 6 into a technology center dedicated to helping mold Seattle’s next generation of tech developers, creative professionals, and future entrepreneurs.

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Who Keeps Us Safe? | Episode 4: MPOP

“Who Keeps Us Safe?” is a podcast by Asian American community organizers that explores ideas of community safety, abolition, and activism. (Artwork: Alex Chuang)

Who Keeps Us Safe? (WKUS) is a podcast by Asian Americans living in Seattle that explores safety, policing, and abolition in our communities and beyond. Join us monthly as we speak with organizers in the Seattle area and reflect on their work and learnings. We hope that our listeners will use this podcast to begin or supplement their own conversations about safety and policing in their own communities. This is a project of PARISOL: Pacific Rim Solidarity Network, a grassroots, anti-imperialist, anti-capitalist, Hong Konger, Taiwanese, and Chinese* diaspora group based in Seattle. PARISOL is dedicated to local and international solidarity, community building, cultural and politicized learning, abolition, and anti-racist work.


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Local Luminaries Light Up the Night at Legendary Children, a QTBIPOC Celebration

by Alex Garland


As the sun set over Elliott Bay, the pink and purple lights of the Seattle Art Museum’s Paccar Pavilion at the Olympic Sculpture Park began lighting the stage for the seventh annual Legendary Children event, Seattle’s summer-ending party celebrating the queer, transgender, Black, Indigenous, People of Color (QTBIPOC) Ballroom Scene. With the event’s first return since the pandemic began, the crowd was eager and engaged as artists of all ages took the stage.

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BIPOC and LGBTQ+ Communities Share Reservations on 988 Hotline

by Lauryn Bray


988 has been touted as a way to help reduce harmful police interventions in mental health emergencies, but emergency medical services and law enforcement will be called if someone indicates that they are a danger to themselves and/or others. While some people argue that this is necessary to prevent a potential crime from occurring, others argue that it adds fuel to the fire, as EMS and police are not trained in properly addressing mental health crises. Instead, mental health advocates are encouraging the use of task forces and peer support models for suicide prevention and intervention as alternatives to the hotline. 

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MAPS Seattle: Building A Downtown Hub for Seattle’s Diverse Muslim Community

by Nura Ahmed


On March 25, 2022, only a few days before Ramadan, the Muslim Association of Puget Sound (MAPS) opened a location in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, only minutes away from the Westlake station. MAPS Seattle was built with the intention to have a space where Muslims from all over the greater Seattle area could find their community. Though there are mosques all over the Puget Sound, from the South End to the east side, MAPS Seattle is the only fully functional mosque in downtown Seattle, serving as a great central location. MAPS Seattle holds weekly Friday prayers and Islamic lectures every Thursday and employs an Imam to lead the mosque’s religious efforts. 

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Seventh Annual Legendary Children Celebrates QTBIPOC House and Ball Communities

by Patheresa Wells


Legendary Children, a multi-arts party celebrating queer and trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (QTBIPOC) communities, returns with its first in-person event in two years. Taking place at Olympic Sculpture Park from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 23, the event will also be available via live stream. This year is the seventh anniversary of Legendary Children, which has been held annually since 2015, including two years of virtual offerings during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

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PHOTO ESSAY | Honoring a Seattle Icon: Pastor Patrinell Wright

by Susan Fried


Over the 25 years I’ve worked as a photojournalist, I’ve photographed Pastor Patrinell Wright and the Total Experience Gospel Choir literally hundreds of times. Pat and the TEGC seemed to be at almost every event I covered. They sang at the annual July 4 Naturalization Ceremony at Seattle Center, the gathering of Black families called the ROOTS Family Celebration, the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Garfield High School — basically any meaningful event in Seattle, Pat and her choir were there. 

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Wa Na Wari’s Walk the Block Returns as the Biggest Black Art Festival in the Northwest

by Patheresa Wells


Walk the Block is an art festival and fundraiser for Wa Na Wari, a Central District hub for Black creativity whose name means “our home” in Kalabari. The festival encourages participants to stroll through the neighborhood, where homes, businesses, parks, porches, and other shared spaces are turned into art installations and performance sites. The second annual Walk the Block takes place on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2–6 p.m. beginning at the Medgar Evers Pool at 23rd and Jefferson.

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50th Annual ROOTS: A Multigenerational Celebration of Seattle Family Legacies

by Lauryn Bray, photos by Susan Fried


On Sept. 4, the ROOTS Family Celebration held its 50th annual event at Jimi Hendrix Park. A day full of music, performances, and food, Black people of all ages gathered together on a Sunday to celebrate heritage and family. 

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