Tag Archives: Community

Estelita’s Library Moves Into a New Central District Location

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Estelita’s Library, Beacon Hill’s beloved justice-focused bookstore, library, and community hub, is moving into a brand new building on Martin Luther King Jr. Way South in the Central District. The move is made possible through a pilot project by the City of Seattle Office of Arts and Culture called Tiny Cultural Spaces. The project seeks to transfer unused plots of city-owned land to arts and culture organizations. The move marks a new chapter for Estelita’s, a beacon for activism, learning, and joy in the South End.

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Focused on Youth Empowerment, Black-Owned QueenCare Opens in Central District Location

by Elizabeth Turnbull


On a snowy, sunny day, the luxury body-care product business QueenCare opened the doors of its second location in Seattle on 23rd Avenue South and South Jackson Street in the new Jackson Apartments in the Central District, continuing an interrupted legacy of Black-owned businesses in the district.

“This is so momentous in so many different ways,” said Monika Mathews, the owner of QueenCare products, at the Feb. 11 grand opening. “We’re standing here in the historic Central District of Seattle.” 

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Hello Em Viet Coffee & Roastery Serves Coffee, Pastries, and Bánh Mì in Little Saigon

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Vietnam is the world’s second largest coffee-producing country, a fact largely unknown to most consumers, though that is changing for those who visit Hello Em Viet Coffee & Roastery. Hello Em is Seattle’s first Vietnamese coffee roastery. Co-owners Yenvy Pham and Nghia Bui carefully oversee every part of the process from sourcing and importing beans from Kon Tum and Buôn Ma Thuột to roasting in house on a Neuhaus Neotec air roaster. The roasted beans make up their signature coffees: the anh roast, a single origin robusta, and em roast, an arabica blend of coffees from Vietnam, Oaxaca, and Ethiopia. 

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PHOTO ESSAY: Best of 2020 — Emerald Photographers Pick Their Favorites

The South Seattle Emerald asked our photojournalists to pick some of their favorite 2020 photos shot for Emerald stories. From protests to pandemic responses to celebrations-despite-it-all, the images show not only a difficult year but also one filled with resilience, strength, and solidarity. We are proud to call South Seattle our home and grateful to our talented photographers for helping us capture our community’s special history.

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Cortona Cafe Will Close at the End of November, to Be Replaced by Melo Cafe

by Jack Russillo


When Isolynn “Ice” Dean, the owner of the Central District’s Cortona Cafe, made the decision to close her coffee shop, she wanted the space to continue to be a hub for the community even after she locks the doors for the final time on November 29.

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Photo Essay: T’Challaween, Some Much-Needed South End Sunshine and Sweetness

by Emerald Staff


This Halloween, the South End changed things up — though it’s probably more fair to say that a really weird year did that for us and we just got creative with the tools we had at our disposal. T’Challaween was something else! We had a blast putting it on. We hope everyone enjoyed the day as much as we did!  

We, the South Seattle Emerald, our exclusive broadcast partner, Rainier Avenue Radio, a stellar list of sponsors (which we’ll get to in a minute), and a dedicated group of volunteers laid the groundwork for the festivities — and the South Seattle community brought the party! (We knew you would, but we were overwhelmed by the turn out. Literally — we ran out of candy!) 

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OPINION: The World We Need Must be Built by Community Not Courtrooms

by Sean Goode


As a child, my family was always on the move — 12 different homes in 12 years of school. It was always something: hiding from my abusive father, getting evicted, or that time we owned a house and the bank foreclosed on it. I learned many lessons while constantly acclimating myself to new spaces. The most valuable of them is that nothing lasts forever. The transient nature of my upbringing gave me terrific respect for the miracle of each day and a faith that has allowed me to unapologetically hold on to a hope for a better tomorrow. 

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A South End Guide to Thriving in the Pandemic — (The Archives)

by Emerald Staff


As King County moves through a phased re-opening of businesses and regular activities, we’ve updated our living guide to be more relevant to the current state of the pandemic. This our archives page. For the latest local coverage of COVID-19-related announcements and events, please follow along with our daily posts (on the home page). We’re also adding relevant updates to this post.

We created a living guide to provide a trusted aggregate resource for South Seattle during the COVID-19 pandemic. These are the guide archives—all our pandemic coverage from March 6, 2020 to June 12, 2020 in one place.


Looking for COVID-19 Updates and current pandemic-related articles for Seattle and King County? Visit this post.

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“For A Greater Purpose”: Community Aids in Clean-Up, Pushes Back Against National Narratives About Previous Day’s Protests

by Carolyn Bick


The Emerald wanted to show the community taking care of each other the day after a peaceful demonstration against systemic racism in the nation’s police force was hijacked by, from many accounts of protestors on the ground, white people who attended with the aim of causing destruction. Mayor Jenny Durkan also acknowledged in a statement on Twitter that “much of the violence and destruction, both here and across the country, has been instigated and perpetuated by white men.” 

Not all the people interviewed here were at the protests, but all came out specifically to help their community. The Emerald wanted to capture the range of thoughts and feelings among these people. They are couples with children and without; community organizers and everyday citizens trying to do their part; demonstrators who said they watched up close as police officers incited violence at the previous day’s protest; and people who did not attend the protest, but felt they had to come down, because doing something was better than sitting with their anxiety at home.

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How a Facebook Group Supporting Seattle’s Chinatown Became a COVID-19 Community Movement

by Sharon H. Chang


It was back in February — what now seems a lifetime ago — when Bill Tashima first heard people were avoiding Seattle’s Chinatown-International District (ID) because of the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China. It was still winter, COVID-19 was not yet a pandemic, and only one known U.S. case existed in nearby Snohomish County (in a man who had visited Wuhan). But because Seattle’s Chinatown, a historically Asian immigrant community, was being perceived as directly connected to China where the outbreak began in December, businesses in the ID had been experiencing decline as early as January. Restaurants were getting hit especially hard. 

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