Tag Archives: COVID-19 Vaccine

NEWS GLEAMS | Cannabis Legislation to Address Inequities, COVID-19 Booster Vaccines Available Next Week

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!

curated by Vee Hua 華婷婷


🖋️Letter From the Editor🖋️

Seattle City Council has unanimously passed a series of new cannabis bills designed to address long-standing racial inequities in the cannabis industry and discrimination caused by the war on drugs. In COVID-19 news, fall boosters are finally rolling through, and UW Medicine is scheduling appointments now.

Highline College will soon launch a Talent Search program, which will help 500 low-income students reach their college goals; we offer some details in this week’s News Gleams.

—Vee Hua 華婷婷, interim managing editor for the South Seattle Emerald

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS | Cannabis Legislation to Address Inequities, COVID-19 Booster Vaccines Available Next Week

NEWS GLEAMS | Fall Changes to COVID-19 Policy, Homework Help Returns With Free Tutoring

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!

curated by Vee Hua 華婷婷


🖋️Letter From the Editor🖋️

A number of changes are anticipated this upcoming fall around COVID-19. To help you prepare better, this installment of News Gleams is focused largely on what one can expect moving forward with vaccines, boosters, at-home tests, and more.

Furthermore, with school coming back into full swing, free homework help and mentorship are now available for students K–12.

—Vee Hua 華婷婷, interim managing editor for the South Sea

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS | Fall Changes to COVID-19 Policy, Homework Help Returns With Free Tutoring

NEWS GLEAMS | COVID-19 Updates, National Climate Change Legislation Passes Senate, & More

A round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!

curated by Vee Hua 華婷婷


After an especially scorching week and with more to come, today’s News Gleams center on health and the environment. Read on about unexpected but ambitious progress on national climate change legislation, Audubon Society’s anti-racist name change, and COVID-19 updates on a city, county, and national level.

—Vee Hua 華婷婷, interim managing editor for the South Seattle Emerald

Continue reading NEWS GLEAMS | COVID-19 Updates, National Climate Change Legislation Passes Senate, & More

Cases Continue to Rise, but Mask Picture Gets Muddy for People Measuring Risk

by Sally James

The Emerald community has been creating ripples with its creativity and genius for 8 magnificent years! Those ripples are felt far beyond South Seattle — community, after all, is not a place but its people. And home can be a place, people, or both. The energy our people generate at home and beyond ignites sparks that prove perennially that even the tiniest of sparks illuminates dark places in all directions and can guide us to wherever we need to go.

Please help us continue to serve our community by becoming a recurring donor during our 8th anniversary campaign, Ripples & Sparks at Home, April 20–28. Become a Rainmaker today by choosing the “recurring donor” option on our donation page! 

—The Emerald Team

Should I wear a mask?

Should I get a second COVID-19 booster vaccine?

Suddenly, questions and answers about staying safe during the COVID-19 pandemic seem as mercurial as Seattle’s spring weather, where it may rain, hail, or shine depending on the hour and where you are.

Continue reading Cases Continue to Rise, but Mask Picture Gets Muddy for People Measuring Risk

Cases Down Statewide, but Uptick in King County for COVID-19

by Sally James


State health officials sounded a familiar, late-stage refrain on COVID-19 Wednesday: Washington is seeing diminishing cases, but the pandemic is not over.

There has been an uptick in cases in King County, according to the Seattle & King County Public Health dashboard, which showed cases were up 42% — from about 175 to 250 daily cases — in the past week. 

Continue reading Cases Down Statewide, but Uptick in King County for COVID-19

OPINION: March 11, 2022 — Global Day of Action for Vaccine Equity

by Julie Bouanna and Jennifer Mas Gilvydis


On this Global Day of Action for Vaccine Equity, and for the pandemic to truly end, we need more global access to the COVID-19 vaccine. It is our best chance at ending the COVID-19 pandemic, which has killed 6 million people, though some estimates put the number closer to 20 million worldwide. Vaccinations protect against the formation of new and possibly more lethal variants. President Biden has committed to vaccinating 70% of the world’s population by this fall; yet, as of today, the White House still has no plan in place to ensure sufficient manufacturing of COVID-19 technologies, including vaccines, to ensure global access needed to end the pandemic. 

Continue reading OPINION: March 11, 2022 — Global Day of Action for Vaccine Equity

State Investigating COVID-19 Outbreak Linked to Wrestling Meets, County Ramps Up Vaccine Availability

by Sally James


The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) is investigating more than 80 cases of COVID-19 linked to four wrestling competitions across the state. Some of the cases included the new variant omicron.

Continue reading State Investigating COVID-19 Outbreak Linked to Wrestling Meets, County Ramps Up Vaccine Availability

Boosters Open Up for Wider Group, Vaccine Likely for Children 5–11

by Sally James


People who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to prevent serious COVID-19 disease are eligible to get a booster, even if they don’t fall into any high-risk category. The Washington Dept. of Health (DOH) included this announcement in their virtual press conference on Oct. 27.

National vaccine regulators approved booster doses of vaccine for people who received Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines Oct. 20, but the recommendations differ depending on which vaccine a person originally took. Earlier this year, the Pfizer boosters were approved for people at high risk — from their age or occupation or an underlying medical condition. Regulators also approved only people at high risk, in the same categories, for Moderna boosters.

With the J&J vaccine, health officials urge all people, even those younger and with no extra risks, to come in and get a booster vaccine dose two months after their original shot of J&J. The reason for allowing boosters sooner for everyone with J&J is that a single shot seems to be less effective at protecting people than the other two-shot vaccines. The DOH estimates about 393,000 people in Washington state had a J&J vaccine.

Continue reading Boosters Open Up for Wider Group, Vaccine Likely for Children 5–11

Weekend Long Reads: The Vaccine Efficacy Studies

by Kevin Schofield


Over the past 18 months, I’ve read well over a hundred research papers on COVID-19, treatments, and vaccines. This week’s “long read” is hands down the most informative of all of them.

One of the essential tenets of science is that it must be repeatable: Every time an event happens, we should expect the same result. In practice we often don’t see precisely the same result, even in laboratory conditions, because of experimental error, contamination, sampling error, unknown confounding factors, and bias (intentional or otherwise). That’s why in the world of science a single research study alone isn’t enough to establish new knowledge; the scientific community waits until other researchers have replicated the study and independently confirmed the results.

In our mad rush to save lives by developing treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, we have often substituted a single carefully crafted and skeptically reviewed clinical trial for the greater assurance that we would get with multiple complete studies — at least for the purposes of “emergency use authorization” by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). But with the passage of time, and the need to recertify the vaccines in multiple countries, there is now a substantial number of vaccine studies that have been published. Together they give us much higher confidence in our estimates of the effectiveness of the vaccines.

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Weekend Long Reads: mRNA Vaccines

by Kevin Schofield


This week’s “long read” is an article in the journal Nature, looking at the long and complicated path leading to the mRNA vaccine technology and techniques used to create the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines against COVID-19.

“Messenger RNA,” or mRNA, is essentially a recipe for building proteins. Living cells use it as a way of passing notes around: Parts of our DNA are transcribed into mRNA, which is then read by the tiny factories in our cells that produce proteins. 

Technically, a virus isn’t alive: It’s just a string of genetic material surrounded by a coating of fat (what biologists call “lipids”) with some proteins on the surface that help it to gain access into our cells (such as the COVID-19 “spike protein”). Once a virus invades our cells, its DNA is also transcribed into mRNA that contains the blueprint for the virus, and then our own cells do all the hard work to churn out thousands of virus copies.

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