Tag Archives: District 2

Meet the District 2 Candidates: Tammy Morales

South Seattle Emerald contributors met with candidates running for Seattle City Council’s District 2 seat. Incumbent Bruce Harrell announced in January he would not run, and seven candidates filed to take over his vacant seat. This week the Emerald will publish interviews the candidates talking about their campaigns in their own words. Today, Emerald contributor Guy Oron speaks with Tammy Morales. Click here to read all of the candidate interviews published so far.

by Guy Oron

Tammy Morales is longtime advocate of economic justice and is running for the Seattle City Council’s District 2 position, which encompasses Southeast Seattle and the Chinatown International District. Tammy started her career working in policy-making as a legislative director in the Texas House of Representatives for Rep. Garnet Coleman. There she “saw firsthand what happens when community isn’t participating in those conversations about how government spends our money.”

Continue reading Meet the District 2 Candidates: Tammy Morales

D2 Candidates Talk Transportation, Housing, and Sustainability City Council Heats Up

by Jake Goldstein-Street

Half a dozen candidates for the Seattle City Council’s District 2 spot met for a Tuesday night forum at the New Holly Gathering Hall as they answered questions on transportation, housing, and the environment — three of the most important issues for local residents facing gentrification and displacement, pushing them farther and farther away from their jobs, forcing them into cars, and driving up carbon emissions.

Continue reading D2 Candidates Talk Transportation, Housing, and Sustainability City Council Heats Up

It’s Not Apathy That Keeps The South End From Voting

by Hanna Brooks Olsen

Low voter turnout in District 2 is a matter of systemic barriers, historical tactics, and unrealistic expectations

There is a perception that folks in the South End simply don’t vote. A confluence of income level, race, age, housing, immigration status, and language barriers Seattle’s second district combines almost every factor that decades of research have linked to low turnout. Continue reading It’s Not Apathy That Keeps The South End From Voting

Despite Close Race, Tammy Morales Concedes

by Hanna Brooks Olsen (originally posted in Seattlish)

We’d had high hopes that Tammy Morales could unseat Bruce Harrell in District 2, but as late drops continued to show her pulling in just about half the vote, it became clear that there would likely not be an upset. Today, she conceded.  Continue reading Despite Close Race, Tammy Morales Concedes

District 2 Candidate Morales: Had the Media Done Their Jobs, The Results of My Race Wouldn’t Come As A Shock

by Marcus Harrison Green (featured image by Alex Garland)

As a number of local media outlets pile up the mea-culpas for overlooking of her campaign, Tammy Morales appears as oblivious to their new found discovery of her candidacy as they once did of her. It wasn’t so much that they left her for dead, as much as they never knew she was alive. Continue reading District 2 Candidate Morales: Had the Media Done Their Jobs, The Results of My Race Wouldn’t Come As A Shock

Eighty-Two Percent of District 2 Still Needs to Vote Today

Will this election finally see a strong turnout from District 2 voters? That’s entirely up to South End voters to decide today. As of Monday night, less than 18% of registered voters in the district have turned in their ballots, compared with over 19-22% for each of the other districts.  Continue reading Eighty-Two Percent of District 2 Still Needs to Vote Today

The Case for Bruce Harrell

Editor’s Note: We asked two District 2 residents to make a case for each of the candidates vying to represent the district as its first-ever city council representative. This is the second of those two articles. Read The Case for Tammy Morales here.

Understanding the Passion of Bruce Harrell: It’s Why You Should Vote for Him

By Cindi Laws, South Seattle Emerald’s “Emerald in the Rough” columnist

When I first met Bruce Harrell, he was registering voters on the South End of Seattle in the late 1990s, at least a decade before he ran and won a seat on the Seattle City Council. He caught my attention because he was comfortably engaging with everybody as though he were a fresh 18-year-old voter, casting a ballot for the first time. As someone who’s registered tens of thousands of voters since the early 1980s, I wanted to get to know this guy.  Continue reading The Case for Bruce Harrell