Tag Archives: Duwamish Tribe

Duwamish Tribe Files Lawsuit Against Interior Department in Fight for Federal Recognition

by Alex Garland and Elizabeth Turnbull


As the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center filled with supporters and members of the Duwamish Tribe on Wednesday, May 11, drumming and singing opened the event with ancient songs and sounds that have echoed across the waters of the Puget Sound for thousands of years. 

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OPINION: It’s 167 Years Past Time to Restore Recognition of the Duwamish Tribe

by The Duwamish Tribal Council

Cecile Hansen (Tribal Council Chair)
Desiree Fagan (Councilmember)
Ken Workman (Councilmember)
James Rasmussen (Councilmember)
John Boddy (Councilmember)
Roger Boddy (Councilmember)
Paul Nelson (Councilmember)
Cindy Williams (Tribal Council Secretary/Treasurer) 
Russell Beard (Councilmember)


For at least 12,000 years, the Duwamish people have been living in what is now called King County. The “People of the Inside” inhabited the lands around Elliott Bay, along the Black, Cedar, and Duwamish Rivers, and around Lake Washington. 

Continue reading OPINION: It’s 167 Years Past Time to Restore Recognition of the Duwamish Tribe

OPINION: Spirit Returns 2.0 — Finding Solidarity at the Duwamish Longhouse

by Amanda Ong


“We were second-class citizens in our own land,” my grandfather used to tell me, perhaps the only time I saw him with a hint of a scowl. Our land then was Hong Kong, where Chinese residents were under British control for 100 years. As the original inhabitants of Hong Kong were Punti, Hakka, Tanka, and Hokkien, the island has always been ethnically Chinese. My grandfather seldom spoke about the marginalization my family experienced during their time in Hong Kong as a British colony and when he did, he was brief. When my mother was a child in the 1960s, our family made the decision to leave Hong Kong to be second-class citizens in another land, hoping for something called “opportunity.” 

Continue reading OPINION: Spirit Returns 2.0 — Finding Solidarity at the Duwamish Longhouse

Indigenous Voices Across the Americas

by Josie Jensen and Jesús Zamora

The Seattle Globalist was a daily online publication that covered the connections between local and global issues in Seattle. The Emerald is keeping alive its legacy of highlighting our city’s diverse voices by regularly publishing and re-publishing stories aligned with the Globalist’s mission. 


Indigenous peoples around the world have been fighting to protect their ancestral lands, languages, and cultures from being erased by colonialism for generations.

In Seattle, on the unceded territory of the Duwamish, Suquamish, and Tulalip people, there are countless movements for Indigenous liberation past and present. These range from the fish wars of the 1960s and ’70s to the Duwamish fight for federal recognition to movements such as Idle No More and 350 Tacoma that work to protect Indigenous lands from environmental degradation to movements calling for justice for missing and murdered Indigenous women to organizations working to uplift Indigenous artists and preserve Indigenous culture such as the Duwamish Longhouse, Yəhaw̓ Indigenous Creatives Collective, and more. 

Similar work is being done by Indigenous people around the world. I got to witness these similarities in a recent trip to Ecuador where I participated in a program organized by Amigos de Las Americas centering Indigenous rights and food justice.

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Shape Our Water: Magdalena ‘Maggie’ Angel-Cano

by Ben Adlin


Shape Our Water is a community-centered project from Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and KVRU 105.7 FM, a hyperlocal low power FM station in South Seattle, to plan the next 50 years of Seattle’s drainage and wastewater systems. Funded by SPU, the project spotlights members of local community-based organizations and asks them to share how water shapes their lives. Our latest conversation is with Maggie Angel-Cano, community engagement and communications specialist for the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition. 

Growing up in South Park, Maggie Angel-Cano spent years without realizing Seattle’s only river ran through her neighborhood. 

“We had no idea there was a river in the community,” she said. “We just, you know, lived our daily life: work, school, back home.”

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West Seattle Bridge Closure Exposes Inequities in Duwamish Valley Communities

by Bunthay Cheam


On March 23, the City of Seattle closed the West Seattle Bridge due to rapidly expanding cracks that rendered it unsafe for vehicle traffic.

The bridge will be closed until at least 2021 and may not be repairable according to Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) director Sam Zimbabwe. SDOT is still working to assess the full cost and timeline of needed repairs.

The city-owned bridge is vital to people living on the West Seattle peninsula, serving as the main route of access to the rest of the city, serving about 100,000 vehicles per day.

The main detour routes offered by the city take drivers through the Duwamish Valley, and through the communities of Georgetown, South Park and along  West Marginal Way.

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Welcome the Water Connects Past and Present of the Duwamish River

by Carolyn Bick

Standing on the Tukwila Community Center’s back patio, Ken Workman squinted a little as he looked towards the Duwamish River. More than two centuries ago, his ancestors looked over the same river, its shape much the same now as it was then.

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Cecile Hansen and the Interminable Road to Justice for the Duwamish

by Judy Furlong

Cecile Hansen’s pursuit of justice for the Duwamish people began in 1974. She was a housewife in her early 30s, living in Tukwila and raising three daughters, when her younger brother, Manny Oliver, came by, mad as all get out.

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From the Archives: Filmmaker Shares Untold Tale of the Duwamish

Sandra Osawa

This article originally appeared on the Emerald in 2014. We are reposting it now in advance of a screening of Princess Angeline on Nov. 1. Click here for details.

In a lifetime spent unearthing stories from history’s cellar as an award winning filmmaker, Sandra Osawa has discovered her fair share of untidy portions of the past that most would sooner forget. Osawa, however, has made it her mission to shed ample amounts of daylight on the travesties of yesterday and their lingering residue found in our present times.

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Experience Stories of Community Resistance at Social Justice Film Festival

by Guy Oron

The seventh annual Seattle Social Justice Film Festival begins Friday with a focus on immigrant rights, Black liberation, and indigenous futurism. The week-long festival features a number of local and global films. Showings will take place from Oct. 5 to 14 at locations throughout the city, including  the Northwest African-American Museum and Duwamish Longhouse.

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