Tag Archives: Education

OPINION | We Must Listen to the Students

by Mark Epstein and Michael Dixon


Almost 60 years ago, in the middle of two decades of civil rights activism that changed our country,  James Baldwin delivered a speech to teachers, in which he declared that the purpose of education is for students to look critically at their society and to have a vision of change they are willing to fight for. Without such a perspective, he says, we will perish, or follow the worst example of a Nazi youth movement.

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Slim Gains for South End Educators Echo After Weeklong Strike

by Ari Robin McKenna


For the next three years, the collective bargaining agreement (CBA) ratified by the Seattle Public Schools (SPS) Board and the general membership of the Seattle Education Association (SEA), the union representing teachers, instructional assistants (IAs), and office workers, will be in effect. 

Though the contract includes an across-the-board pay raise and a number of other significant gains, most SEA members do not seem to have gained much ground in their stated priority areas, particularly in their first and third priorities: “Adequate support for special education and multilingual education,” and “Living wages for all SPS educators.” These are issues that impact South Seattle especially. Students of Color are disproportionately represented in the overall special education population, the majority of SPS’ multilingual learners attend South End schools, and the educators not making a living wage are more likely to be People of Color who live here.

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Othello Child-Care Center Invests in ‘Nature’ Playground

Dirt itself may stretch young minds

by Sally James


Children at the Tiny Tots Development Center preschool in South Seattle’s Othello neighborhood have some new ways of learning after the center created a “nature” playground designed to stretch their imaginations. The center was dedicated Sept. 8.

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Striking Rainier Valley Educators Describe Special Education, Multilingual Learner Challenges

by Ari Robin McKenna


On either Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday, Sept. 7–9, Seattleites wouldn’t have had to go far to notice people picketing in red T-shirts. In front of the more than 100 public school buildings across the city, educators and school staff held up signs that read “On Strike!,” “Fair Contract Now!,” and “#ListenToStudents, #ListenToEducators,” often with parent and student support, food, shade tents, and music blasting. They were buoyed by the frequent yells and honks of passersby.

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Central District Child Care Center Takes On Climate Change

by Agueda Pacheco Flores


When temperatures started hitting 100 degrees last summer, Lois Martin knew it didn’t matter how many fans she had running — the Community Day Center for Children (CDCC) in the Central District would have to close. 

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Pay Is Peripheral as Kent Educators Strike, Demand a Quality Experience for Students

by Ari Robin McKenna


While last Thursday, Aug. 25, was supposed to be the first day of school, three dozen educators from Meeker Middle School were outside of the building in the 90-degree midday heat. Passing cars on Southeast 192nd Street honked every 10–20 seconds in support of the striking educators; many of the educators wore red and held signs reading “KENT Education Assoc. ON STRIKE!”

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Garfield High Centennial: Celebrating 100 Years of Shaping the Central District and Beyond

More than just a high school, Garfield has a legacy of acceptance and breaking through racial barriers.

by Phil Manzano


Garfield High School will mark the centennial of its founding Saturday, Aug. 27, commemorating a school whose values of diversity and acceptance have shaped generations of students as well as the culture of Seattle and beyond.

Garfield is more than just a high school — it is a pillar of the Central District, one that not only broke down racial barriers throughout its history, but spurred many on to greatness. 

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WeTrain Washington Celebrates Pilot Meat Cutting Program Graduates

by Ronnie Estoque


On Thursday, Aug. 11, WeTrain Washington celebrated their Meatcutter Pre-Apprenticeship Program graduates at the South Seattle College Georgetown campus. Attendees enjoyed barbecued New York strip steaks at the event. 

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OPINION | How Youth Mentorship Nurtures Academic, Professional, and Emotional Success

by Raul Melgarejo


Mentorship can uplift confidence and open limitless opportunities for success. As a teenager, I attended St. Andrew Nativity School in Portland where their Graduate Support Program matched me with a mentor to help me navigate the ins and outs of my higher education journey. 

Being part of the first generation in my family to benefit from higher education in the United States, I needed a mentor to provide support in areas that the adults in my life weren’t able to provide, which is why I’m so passionate about advocating for youth mentorship, hence my role as the director of Graduate Support at Seattle Nativity School. The following are three examples of how youth mentorship has impacted the lives of local youth and Seattle Nativity School students.

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How Kaley Duong and Alexis Mburu Became Award-Winning Youth Activists

by Ari Robin McKenna


Kaley Duong and Alexis Mburu knew there was something wrong with school, only it took them a while to find the right words, to know how to phrase them, and to channel their innate leadership ability. In middle school, both joined racial equity clubs that began to illuminate aspects of the issues they were seeing or facing. In high school, both began speaking out more frequently, organizing, and building community around taking action to address the ills of a system they were still in. During the 2021–2022 school year — when Duong was a senior and Mburu a junior — both were unstoppable, working tirelessly for racial equity in schools while organizing, participating in, and speaking at events that impacted thousands.

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