Tag Archives: Environment

Academy for Creating Excellence Supports Young Black Men and Black Teachers

by Chamidae Ford


On Wednesday evening, Feb. 17, the Academy for Creating Excellence (ACE) hosted their second installment of the Black Educators Cafe, a series dedicated to helping Black people in the education field find community and support.

In August of 2020, ACE received a grant from the City of Seattle as part of an initiative to invest in youth mentorship and diversity programs. By partnering with the City’s Department of Education and Early Learning, ACE has been able to expand its reach beyond students and has begun working with Black educators as well. 

These events were created to provide a safe space for Black educators, providing a virtual place where they can discuss issues that their Black students face and also their experiences working in a predominantly white field. 

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Q&A: Mayoral Candidate Andrew Grant Houston Shares His Vision for Seattle, Starting With Housing and Climate Justice

by Mark Van Streefkerk


Andrew Grant Houston, AIA, Founder and Design Head of House Cosmopolitan and Board Member of Futurewise, officially announced his run for Mayor on Jan. 12, and he is clear about the cornerstone of his campaign: housing. The queer, Black, and Latino architect and small business owner has a vision for meeting the demand for affordable housing in Seattle, and is eager to share just how housing is directly linked to climate justice and defunding the police by 50%. Houston serves as Interim Policy Manager for Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, and is a member of AIA Seattle, Share The Cities, The Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council, The Sunrise Movement, and the 43rd Democrats. He plans on contributing a portion of the campaign funds he receives to mutual aid groups he has worked with over the last year. 

Houston, also known as “Ace,” recently spoke with the  Emerald, telling us about his background, and the immediate actions Seattle needs to take in the next eight years to curb climate change. Check out his website at agh4sea.com.

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Forterra’s South Sound Gathering Brings Together BIPOC Leaders to Discuss the Future of Conservation in Our Region


by Jack Russillo

In the battle to confront the effects of climate change, Emily Pinckney, a Black marine biologist working for the Point Defiance Zoo, has compared the process for BIPOC communities to crabs in a barrel. 

First of all, crabs shouldn’t be in a barrel, she says. We should not be trapping ourselves in a scenario that forces us to claw at one another in a competitive struggle for survival and that ends with us getting boiled. There’s no reason for us to need to compete.

“Equality is not a pie, and there’s not just one slice for People of Color,” said Pinckney, a community-appointed member of the state’s Environmental Justice Task Force. “We need to make sure that we actually educate everyone and not necessarily empower people — because we do have power — but recognizing that power that we have and reminding us that we have it … Some people get it and some people just haven’t had the time to understand the concepts of diversity, equity, and inclusion and why they’re valuable to this [environmentalism] movement.”

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Edwin Wanji Brings Solar Energy to South Seattle — and Rural Kenya

by Sally James


When two men met long ago as part of a city committee, they didn’t know that years later it would lead to a solar installation.

Dennis Comer, who lives near Genesee Park, works as the director of the nonprofit Central Area Collaborative. His days are spent trying to promote investments and development that will benefit the Central District and preserve its cultural legacy.

Edwin Wanji is the owner of Sphere Solar Energy, a five-year-old company that installs solar panels on roofs in Washington as well as around the world. Wanji is an immigrant from Kenya who came to the United States with two $20 bills in his pocket as a college student almost 15 years ago.

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Local artist draws connection between race and climate change

by Gus Marshall

South Seattle-based interdisciplinary visual artist Carol Rashawwna Williams explores the often-overlooked intersection of racial injustice and climate change. Her somber, monolithic prints slowly sway from the ceiling of Seattle University’s Hedreen Gallery, evoking a grave feeling of interconnected grief and pain. Williams’ current exhibit, “For the Record”, showing through Oct. 11, examines the stark similarities and disparities of two seemingly different issues: global warming and the lasting impacts of slavery.

Williams also serves as the Co-Executive Director of Community Arts Create (CAC), a nonprofit. CAC works to combat gentrification and the displacement of communities of color in the Hillman City area by building and strengthening relationships through community art programs and neighborhood engagement. The South Seattle Emerald spoke with Williams about her upcoming annual fundraiser for Community Arts Create, which will take place on Oct. 25 at the Hillman City Collaboratory.

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Will Seattle Finally Protect South End Trees? A Leafy Promise Left Unfulfilled

How will communities of color be served?

by Carolyn Bick/InvestigateWest

Giving the small, lithe trunk of a baby conifer a gentle shake, Georgetown resident Andrew Schiffer looks up and says in a concerned tone, “See? These aren’t getting water.”

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OPINION: Seattle Needs a Green New Deal

by James Williams

At Got Green, we feel the energy and national conversation sparked by the Green New Deal as proposed by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a good thing. In this moment, it is possible to make societal change on a massive scale. Climate Change — and the fact we must restructure our lives to survive impending environmental disasters — has captured the imagination across generations. All of this is a really good thing.

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Got Green: Our Futures Won’t be Traded

Cap and Trade is a False Solution to Climate Change

by Jill Mangaliman and Edgar Franks

“How can you buy or sell the sky?”

These words by Chief Seattle resonate today, especially when there are contradicting proposals for climate action that pit profit against people and planet. Cap and Trade — also known as Carbon Markets — are “market-based” schemes introduced for and by major climate-polluting corporations in order to claim they are taking meaningful steps to limit (and over time) reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

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Indigenous Activists Lead Environmental Protests to 44 Area Branches of Chase Bank

story and photos by Alex Garland

According to Alec Connon, an environmental activist with 350 Seattle, “JP Morgan Chase is the largest funder of fossil fuels in the world, with $196 billion invested in the fossil fuel industry” since 2015. The company’s investments contradict CEO Jamie Dimon’s statements that he disagrees with Trump’s decision to remove the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement.

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Got Green: Our Organizing Can Prevent Forest Fires

OpEds by Got Green appear in the South Seattle Emerald every month.

by Marion Romero and James Williams

As the month of April begins to unfold, the infamous Earth Day rolls around. Like years before, many people will plant trees, participate in park clean ups, or attend fairs that focus on sustainability and a cleaner planet. While these are positive things, we must understand that celebrating the Earth one day a year will not stop climate change.

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