Tag Archives: Featured

T’Challaween Parade, Contests, More This Weekend! The Event & How to Enter the Contests

This Saturday, Oct. 30, “T’Challaween — A South End Tribute to Our Heroes” returns for a second year of costumes, candy, contests, and — most importantly — community!

Learn how to enter the costume and (our inaugural) “Spookiest House” contests.

by Emerald Staff


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The Morning Update Show — 10/25

The Morning Update Show — hosted by Trae Holiday and The Big O (Omari Salisbury) — is the only weekday news and information livestream that delivers culturally relevant content to the Pacific Northwest’s urban audience. Omari and Trae analyze the day’s local and national headlines as well as melanin magic in our community. Watch live every weekday at 11 a.m. on any of the following channels, hosted by Converge Media: YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, Periscope, and whereweconverge.com.

We also post the Morning Update Show here on the Emerald each day after it airs, so you can catch up any time of day while you peruse our latest posts.

Morning Update Show — Monday, Oct. 25

Live From King County Elections HQ | Converge The Vote! | Learn How to Register and Vote

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Seattle School Board Candidate Laura Marie Rivera Answers the South End’s Questions

by Ari McKenna


The Emerald asked the two finalists in the city’s tightest school board race, Laura Marie Rivera and Vivian Song Maritz, nine questions collected from community members with a stake in education, and then one of our own.

Though the District 4 primary was decided by voters in that district — which includes Ballard, Magnolia, and Northern Queen Anne — the runoff is citywide, so South End voters get to weigh in. The board member elected — while not representing the South End directly — will develop policy that impacts schools, families, and communities here.

Besides writing policy and hiring and evaluating the superintendent, school board directors balance the annual budget and are meant to determine what education entails based on the vision and values of the community they represent. While important, school board director positions are currently unpaid — but for a $4,800 stipend.

Voting closes on Nov. 2, 2021. Vivian Song Maritz’s answers are available here.

Continue reading Seattle School Board Candidate Laura Marie Rivera Answers the South End’s Questions

Seattle School Board Candidate Vivian Song Maritz Answers the South End’s Questions

by Ari McKenna


The Emerald asked the two finalists in the city’s tightest school board race, Laura Marie Rivera and Vivian Song Maritz, nine questions collected from community members with a stake in education, and then one of our own.

Though the District 4 primary was decided by voters in that district — which includes Ballard, Magnolia, and Northern Queen Anne — the runoff is citywide, so South End voters get to weigh in. The board member elected — while not representing the South End directly — will develop policy that impacts schools, families, and communities here.

Besides writing policy and hiring and evaluating the superintendent, school board directors balance the annual budget and are meant to determine what education entails based on the vision and values of the community they represent. While important, school board director positions are currently unpaid — but for a $4,800 stipend.

Voting closes on Nov. 2, 2021. Laura Marie Rivera’s answers are available here.

Continue reading Seattle School Board Candidate Vivian Song Maritz Answers the South End’s Questions

Custodian Photo Exhibit Hopes to Help Public Value Essential Workers

by Sally James


A mother and daughter want you to look twice when you see a custodian in a hallway. 

The art exhibit, called  (in)Visibility, consists of a series of photographs, mostly taken by custodians themselves, many of them immigrants or People of Color. Curator Evalynn Fae Taganna Romano is using the images to fight against what the pandemic highlighted for her: that society was ignoring custodians, including her own mother, Evalina. 

As a student studying public health when the coronavirus pandemic began, Evalynn was struck by the disparity among essential workers. At first, she saw some get food or flowers or free personal protective equipment. Later, those same people received early access to vaccines. But custodians didn’t qualify for this preferential treatment, despite their being essential to keeping buildings clean, hospitals tidy, and schools safe.

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Intentionalist: Find Us at These BIPOC-Owned Food Trucks

by Jax Kiel

Intentionalist is built on one simple idea: where we spend our money matters. We make it easy to find, learn about, and support small businesses and the diverse people behind them through everyday decisions about where we eat, drink, and shop. #SpendLikeItMatters


Since the late 2000s, food trucks have become increasingly popular across the United States. Mobile food purveyors have created a street food-esque alternative to fast food for the customers looking to walk up, grab their food, and go. 

For some truck owners, their way of doing business is the affordable alternative to opening a brick-and-mortar. For others, their food truck is a way of sharing their passion with the widest, most diverse population they can. 

While there is a plethora of food trucks in the heart of downtown Seattle, don’t forget about the incredible businesses selling food in South Seattle. For those not looking to venture deep into the city, visit one of the food trucks on your doorstep.

You can find these three BIPOC-owned food trucks in and around the Central District and South Seattle, serving fast, easy, and delicious dishes. Keep an eye out on their websites and social media to find out when they’ll be near you next.

Weekend Long Reads: How to Save a Quarter-Trillion Dollars in Our Healthcare System

by Kevin Schofield


Each year nearly $4 trillion is spent on health care in the United States; of that, about one-quarter, or $950 million, is spent on administrative expenses. This week’s “long read” is a report by the business consultant McKinsey & Company on how money could be saved through administrative simplification and other business process improvements.

American health care is a multi-payer (over 900 of them), largely for-profit system. The benefit of such a system is that it can drive innovation in technology and treatments, as we have seen during the COVID-19 pandemic with vaccines to reduce infections and new drugs to treat the disease. But as we all know only too well, it is a broken system in many aspects: It’s expensive, often inefficient, and far less than comprehensive. Many of the policy decisions that brought us to this point are beyond the scope of McKinsey’s study, but it doesn’t take much work to identify the inefficiency and expense derived from the overhead of having multiple payers, providers, and patients. The health care industry is also heavily regulated, which protects patients but creates additional overhead for compliance.

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Skyway Community Members Offered Stipend to Participate in Building Local Food Economy

by Elizabeth Turnbull


Community members are encouraged to join and provide input at “Local Foods, Local Places Virtual Workshop” sessions which will be held Monday through Thursday of next week. Organized by the Urban Food Systems Pact – Skyway (UFSPS), the events will help develop a community action plan to grow the local food economy and to improve access to healthy foods.

The sessions will explore possible food-related projects such as developing an affordable neighborhood farmer’s market, a food hub with a commercial kitchen for entrepreneurs, or a gardening program led by BIPOC elders. 

The purpose of the workshop is to form a short-term action plan for improving access to local foods to be implemented through the next two to five years.

Continue reading Skyway Community Members Offered Stipend to Participate in Building Local Food Economy