Tag Archives: Featured

Graham Hill Elementary Raising Funds to Provide Direct Cash Aid to Families

by Ben Adlin


With the pandemic’s economic impact hitting vulnerable households hardest, Seward Park’s Graham Hill Elementary is turning to the surrounding community for relief, asking for donations to provide direct cash payments to students’ families.

The online fundraiser launched last month is the latest effort by parents and staff at South End public schools to provide flexible financial relief to families unable to afford everyday expenses, often because of COVID-19-related job losses or reduced work. Similar efforts at Rainier View and Concord International elementary schools have each raised tens of thousands of dollars in community aid since organizers began them this spring.

Graham Hill’s current goal is to raise $20,000 in donations by the end of 2020. The money will be available to families in increments of $250 to $1,000, which can be used for whatever expenses the families deem necessary.

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King County Metro to Pause Work on RapidRide R Line Expansion Indefinitely Due to COVID-19-Related Budget Shortfalls

by Jack Russillo


Work on the long-awaited RapidRide R Line that will one day replace the Route 7 bus will be paused indefinitely, King County Metro has decided over the past several months. The halt comes after the King County Council’s vote on the 2021-2022 proposed budget last month. An online public town hall tomorrow, Dec. 4, will provide more updates and allow community members to ask questions about the project’s suspension.

Continue reading King County Metro to Pause Work on RapidRide R Line Expansion Indefinitely Due to COVID-19-Related Budget Shortfalls

‘Black Futures’: A Timeless Capture of What It Means to Be Black and Alive

by M. Anthony Davis


Last night, Seattle Arts & Lectures in partnership with the Central District Forum for Arts & Ideas hosted a virtual lecture with Kimberly Drew and Jenna Wortham to promote their co-edited new book Black Futures

The lecture itself was a robust conversation about the writers’ journey curating this eclectic anthology and their experiences stepping into the realm of being editors for the first time. As a writer myself, it was especially interesting to hear about the dynamics of being on the opposite side of pressing due dates and having to tackle tasks like heavy cuts to pieces submitted by contributors.

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OPINION: The Acceptance

by Jasmine M. Pulido


In the 2020 presidential election, Trump won the second-highest number of votes by any U.S. presidential candidate in history. Though he still ended up losing the race, this number is nothing to sneeze at. I heard a general outcry of surprise and shock at these statistics, at how close this country was to a second Trump term, particularly from my white progressive liberal peers here in Seattle.

But why are people still so surprised? 

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Homelessness Authority Weighs in on Battle Over Future of Renton Shelter (and Shelters in Renton)

by Erica C. Barnett

(This article originally appeared on PubliCola and has been reprinted under an agreement.)


The King County Regional Homelessness Authority (RHA) held a previously unscheduled meeting of its implementation board last night to discuss how to respond to a City of Renton proposal that would shut down a shelter run by the Downtown Emergency Service Center (DESC) at the Red Lion hotel in Renton. The legislation would also ban most, if not all, homeless shelters from the city.

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‘Black and Center’ — Collaboration, Color, and Care

by Jasmine J Mahmoud


Election anxiety marked my beginning of last month. Like many others, I grew fixated on the results trickling in state by state, county by county, block by block across the week. That first November week felt endless, for lack of sleep and newly emerging, quickly chronic, routines. At midnight, and 3 a.m., and 5 a.m., I refreshed electoral maps of Georgia and Pennsylvania. With daylight, I watched television news on mute, while working on my laptop. At all hours, the buzz of “breaking news” kept my body on alert. When Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were finally confirmed on November 7, unfamiliar feelings of relief and elation emerged, nevertheless battling existing currents of anxiety and dread. Last week, I ate Thanksgiving dinner with my partner, thinking about the atrocities hidden by that holiday including stolen Indigenous land. 

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Older Man Said to Be Veteran Suffering From PTSD Pepper Sprayed, Pulled to Ground by SPD Officer

by Carolyn Bick


An older man whom neighbors say is a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder is said to be recuperating at home, after a Seattle Police Department officer pepper sprayed and then pulled him to the ground, during a protest in Capitol Hill on the evening of Nov. 27. Posts on Twitter say that the man was trying to speak to the officers about how their actions and use of a loudspeaker were triggering for him.

One of the man’s neighbors, who declined to be identified by name when the Emerald later spoke with him, caught the incident on video, and posted it online shortly after. Though the video is marked as Nov. 29, someone else made the Emerald aware that this actually happened on Nov. 27. The video, which the Emerald has included below, shows the older man interacting with a Seattle Police Department (SPD) officer, who is pushing him backwards. The older man is carrying what appears to be a collapsible cane.

Continue reading Older Man Said to Be Veteran Suffering From PTSD Pepper Sprayed, Pulled to Ground by SPD Officer

Tracy Castro-Gill Is Insuppressible, and So Is Ethnic Studies

by Ari Robin McKenna

This is the sixth in a series of seven articles about ethnic studies. Find the first five here.


On January 30, 2020, during the whir of a work day, the Seattle Public Schools Ethnic Studies Program Manager, Tracy Castro-Gill, was placed on paid administrative leave. She was told she needed to be out of the John Stanford Center for Educational Excellence (JSCEE) effective immediately. As Castro-Gill was escorted out of the building with all of her belongings, she remembers that time seemed to go in reverse as she passed coworkers she’d called out for their actions or words supporting systemic racism — in a district office that has presided over a school system with decades of appalling racial disparities. The Ethnic Studies Advisory Group (ESAG) that Castro-Gill had assembled to develop K–12 ethnic studies content began a boycott of SPS the next day in protest. Mandated by a unanimous 2017 School Board of Directors order, the Advisory Group’s work has remained on a district hard drive somewhere inside the bunker-like JSCEE, despite the winds of change swirling outside. A white man Castro-Gill worked with later mocked her with casual finality: “How’s that call-out culture working out for you, Tracy?”

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Skyway Event to Provide Healthcare Resources, COVID-19 Testing, and Metro Cards

by Elizabeth Turnbull


As COVID-19 cases have risen in the state, Public Health Seattle-King County and community organizations are stepping in to help. The groups are hosting a free event in Skyway on Dec. 5, which will provide assistance with health insurance enrollment, flu vaccines, COVID-19 testing, and ORCA Lift cards. 

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WEEKLY NEWS GLEAMS: Black and Indigenous People’s Artist Residencies, WOC in WA State Politics Fireside Chat, & More …

A weekly round-up of news and announcements we don’t want to get lost in the fast-churning news cycle!

curated by Emerald Staff


Black and Indigenous People’s Artist Residencies

From the source (Seattle Print Arts and Editions Studio):
Seattle Print Arts in partnership with Editions is offering year-long residencies to three artists, which will provide access for Black and Indigenous artists to create artists’ books, broadsides, posters, and other works on paper at Editions in Seattle, WA.

Continue reading WEEKLY NEWS GLEAMS: Black and Indigenous People’s Artist Residencies, WOC in WA State Politics Fireside Chat, & More …