Tag Archives: Featured

How to Truly Commemorate Women’s Equality Day

by Marilyn Watkins

We celebrate Women’s Equality Day on August 26 – the 95th anniversary of women in the U.S. winning the right to vote. It was not an easy victory. It took 72 years, with a multitude of activists using many tactics, from the formal launch of the women’s rights movement at Seneca Falls in 1848 to final passage of the 19th Amendment in 1920. Continue reading How to Truly Commemorate Women’s Equality Day

A Love Letter to Our Communities: When One Mourns, We All Mourn

( Note: A copy of the following letter was presented to Seattle City Councilmembers during the public comment portion of Monday, August 17th’s city council meeting.)

As people of color in Seattle, many of us are grieving the loss of our loved ones to violence in recent weeks. Donnie Chin, beloved champion of community safety in the International District, was killed by gun violence on July 23rd.  Our African-American community is also grieving the loss of so many of its youth, whose promise and potential were not fully realized:  On July 2, 30-year-old Torrence Phillips was killed by gun violence in Seattle’s Central District.  On July 30, 20-year-old Muldhata Dawud was killed by gun violence in Federal Way.  The next day, while returning from Muldhata’s funeral service, his friend, 20-year-old Zakariya Ibrahim Issa, was shot and killed while talking to his mother on his cell phone.   These are just a few of the names of people we have lost – each of them someone’s child, someone’s nephew, someone’s loved one. Continue reading A Love Letter to Our Communities: When One Mourns, We All Mourn

Op-Ed: Seattle’s Urban Planners Have a Language All Their Own

by Carolee Colter and John V Fox

(Note: This article originally appeared in  August 2015 editions of Pacific Publishing newspapers and has been reprinted with permission)

When zoning changes are proposed for the place where you live, things aren’t always what they seem. We’re here to help you decode city planner terminology. Continue reading Op-Ed: Seattle’s Urban Planners Have a Language All Their Own

Review: Tina Vernon’s Note To Self, An Evening of Storytelling and Music

by Mary Hubert

When I walked into the Royal Room in Columbia City two Sundays ago to see Tina Vernon’s show “NOTE TO SELF, An Evening of Storytelling and Music”, I expected to sit through a beautiful but fairly standard music set. The only thing I knew about Tina was that she is quite the singer, known for soul, jazz, and rock pieces. So, when I plopped down at my table, I opened my notebook and wrote “T Vernon Music Review” at the top, fully expecting to hear some nice tunes and whisk myself away at the end of an hour or so. Continue reading Review: Tina Vernon’s Note To Self, An Evening of Storytelling and Music

Murray Goes to South Seattle, United States Senator Pays Visit to Local Businesses

by Marcus Harrison Green

“Do you think it’s okay to say hello to her?” enthused a member of the late lunch crowd at Columbia City’s Salted Sea. On Monday afternoon, she – along with more than a half-dozen surprised patrons – was treated to the sight of United States Senator Patty Murray feasting on shrimp toast as she spoke with locals. Continue reading Murray Goes to South Seattle, United States Senator Pays Visit to Local Businesses

At Beacon Hill Freedom School, Students Build to Take Apart

Youth gain tools to help them combat systemic oppression at South End Freedom School.

by Tom James

Freedom School students listen intently during a session. Photo Credit: Celia Berk
Freedom School students listen intently during a session. Photo Credit: Celia Berk

In a long, sunny room in Beacon Hill’s Bethany United Church, a struggle is taking place. One by one, students sitting against the walls try their hands, diving into the middle of the room to wrestle mightily with the thing. One by one they stand up, stretch their shoulders, and try to wrap their arms around it. But every student stays firmly planted in their chair. And the sweat that stands out is not the sweat of physical exertion, but mental effort. The thing they try to wrap their arms around is not a physical foe, but a shadow. A presence. Something, they attest one by one, that has followed them throughout their lives. Continue reading At Beacon Hill Freedom School, Students Build to Take Apart

Seattle’s Housing Crisis and The City’s Future

by John Stafford

“Capitalism is doing what capitalism does.” Thus lamented a Cambridge, Massachusetts reporter as he witnessed the town’s transformation from a distinctive neighborhood with idiosyncratic shops and affordable housing to a more prosaic district with chain outlets and upscale housing.  His point (and mine) is not that capitalism is an undesirable economic system.  Rather, the point is that capitalism is a powerful and often amoral engine that, left to its own devices, can alter the character of a locality in a manner that most residents find undesirable. Continue reading Seattle’s Housing Crisis and The City’s Future