Tag Archives: Featured

You’ve Read 1000 Books

by Nikkita Oliver

I detest disclaimers. I strive to own my story, let you own your reaction, and vise versa. Nonetheless, I’d like to first quote fellowBad Feminist” Roxane Gay, from her TEDwomen Talk:

“As a feminist I feel a lot of pressure. We have this tendency to put visible feminists on a pedestal. We expect them to pose perfectly. When they disappoint us, we gleefully knock them from the pedestal we put them on…‘I am a mess.’ Consider me knocked off that pedestal before you try to put me up there.”

Disclaimer: I, too, am a mess with a lot of cleaning up to do. Continue reading You’ve Read 1000 Books

Peaceful Protectors, Native Americans Arrested at the Dakota Access Pipeline

by Kelsey Hamlin

UPDATE (10/05/16, 7:31pm): John L. Little, the assistant curator & research team leader at Seattle’s Museum of Flight, confirmed with us in an email Oct. 5 that “injecting vegetable oil into an airplane’s hot exhaust flow is done all the time at air shows.” White smoke is produced by many types of vegetable oil, but primarily Canopus oil. An agricultural airplane could easily do this, “but doing so to compensate for an inoperative radio is definitely not a standard procedure in aviation.”

UPDATE (10/01/16, 2:30pm): South Seattle Emerald was informed by one of our freelance photographers that Long Range Acoustic Devices — used to create high-pitched noise for crowd control — were used by law enforcement on the protectors as they prayed by the pipeline.

Thursday afternoon, the South Seattle Emerald received a call from Jennifer Fuentes – one of the protectors who traveled from Seattle to North Dakota to stand against the North Dakota Access Pipeline.

Fuentes said protectors were leaving a site by the pipeline after having gathered for prayer when 21 of them were encircled and arrested. Fuentes, who participated in the NoDAPL march in Seattle, was not arrested. But South Seattle resident Bob Barnes was.  Continue reading Peaceful Protectors, Native Americans Arrested at the Dakota Access Pipeline

Rainier Valley Welcomes New 100 Foot Mural Inspired by Journey of Foster Youth

by Marcus Harrison Green

No matter how gloomy Seattle’s fall days may get those headed northbound on Martin Luther King Way from Columbia City will be able to gaze upon perpetual blue sky and sunshiny smiles of children, as South Seattle welcomed a vibrant 100 foot long mural on Thursday morning. Continue reading Rainier Valley Welcomes New 100 Foot Mural Inspired by Journey of Foster Youth

Hub Fest Transforms Mt. Baker Into “Living Community”

by Goorish Wibneh

Last Sunday, dozens of local vendors, musicians and visual artists combined to help celebrate the Mount Baker Hub Festival. The festival, in its second year, sought to promote and highlight community engagement and economic development and to lay the ground work for a “model community” around the Mt. Baker Link Light Rail Station.

The festival, which featured music, food, art, community booths, and a beer garden, joined hands with Seattle Design Festival to showcase the role art and design play in the transformation of underdeveloped areas. Continue reading Hub Fest Transforms Mt. Baker Into “Living Community”

City Council Meeting Erupts with Block the Bunker Protests, Altercation with Security Guards

by Kelsey Hamlin

 Once Seattle City Council’s Monday meeting reached items on the agenda involving a new North precinct (‘the Bunker’), demonstrations were held, tensions rose, and the meeting was adjourned — which wouldn’t be the first time. But before all that, Seattle Council Security confronted Block The Bunker activists in what was described by activists involved as “a physical assault.”  Continue reading City Council Meeting Erupts with Block the Bunker Protests, Altercation with Security Guards

Seattle and Washington Tribes March for Standing Rock, Sign Resolution

by Kelsey Hamlin

“Every single tribe, they’re gems to our community and to our state” said Peggen Frank of Northern Arapaho and Oglala Lakota Tribes. “There’s no media coverage. They’re missing the point, not showing the real pictures. [The North Dakota Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and supporting Native Americans] are not protesters, they’re protectors.” Continue reading Seattle and Washington Tribes March for Standing Rock, Sign Resolution

Cooperatives Offer Affordable Housing Alternative to Seattleites

by Will Sweger

As housing prices in Seattle continue skyward and the specter of gentrification looms, cooperative housing stands as a largely untapped alternative model.

Seattle led the nation in home price increases this summer. Recent data released from Northwest Multiple Listing Service places Seattle’s average single-family house at $666,500. The affordability of rentals hasn’t fared much better. The average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment increased 38 percent from 1998 to hit $1,412. Continue reading Cooperatives Offer Affordable Housing Alternative to Seattleites

Touring the North Seattle Police Station

by Brett Hamil

Yesterday morning I went on a tour of the North Seattle police precinct station with a group of journalists, activists and community leaders organized by city councilmember Kshama Sawant.

The purpose of the outing was, of course, to see whether the current precinct is so outdated and overcrowded as to warrant the construction of a $149 million new facility (i.e. the Bunker). Continue reading Touring the North Seattle Police Station

Neighborhood Artist Spotlight: Valerie Curtis-Newton

by Lola E. Peters

 When Valerie Curtis-Newton and her partner, now wife, Kim Powell moved to South Seattle’s Hillman City neighborhood in 1998, the New York Times refused to deliver their Sunday edition to homes on the Beacon Hill side of Rainier Avenue South. Much has changed in the neighborhood since. Curtis-Newton says she can even get food delivered to their home now.

Much has also changed in Curtis-Newton’s relationship to Seattle’s theater world. She is now Professor, Head of Performance, Directing, Acting at the University of Washington’s School of Drama. In 2006, she and Vivian Phillips founded the Hansberry Project to bring theater written by and about African Americans to Seattle. Continue reading Neighborhood Artist Spotlight: Valerie Curtis-Newton

Vietnamese Veterans Continue to Feel War’s Lasting Impact

by Jeff Nguyen

Every year a huge celebration for Vietnamese veterans is held in Orange County, California. My grandfather, a veteran of the Vietnam War and proud member of the Vietnamese community, watches it religiously, staring intensely at the TV set. The pride on his face is evident as the color guard marches on stage carrying a bright yellow flag emblazoned with three red stripes.

He changes the channel to watch news about Vietnam’s state of affairs. Today it’s a mix between President Barack Obama’s recent visit to eat Pho with Anthony Bourdain and the arrests of more native journalists and bloggers, their faces forming a mosaic as the network illustrates the scale of the crackdown.

In a sense, he is still home and war hasn’t ended. Continue reading Vietnamese Veterans Continue to Feel War’s Lasting Impact