Tag Archives: Featured

Articles of Faith: The Day All Lives Truly Matter

Note: Articles of Faith is a regular column featuring social critiques from local members of diverse religious denominations.

by Marcus Harrison Green

(The following is the transcript from a speech delivered at Westside Unitarian Universalist Congregation on Sunday, September 28th. You can listen to an audio recording of it here.)

I always brag to my friends that Westside Unitarian has the largest black membership of any Unitarian Church in the state. One of them brought that up to me when I told him I was fretting over giving a sermon on racism here today. He asked me how large it actually was. When I told him five, he said: “Oh five percent! That’s not bad, especially in Washington.” I said, no – 5 people. He said: Marcus I know being agnostic, you’re kind of iffy on that whole “does God exist or not” thing, but if I were you I’d get down on my knees in some intense prayer to him. Continue reading Articles of Faith: The Day All Lives Truly Matter

Review: Super Six Restaurant, Simply Super

by Marilee Jolin

Earlier this summer I walked down Hudson street in Columbia City and noticed a couple guys up on a ladder, painting a brick building I’d never really noticed before.  The logo was black and I could just make out the first two large S’s at the far left side.  A few days later, I was so happy to learn this would be the site for Super Six, the newest restaurant from the owners of Marination Ma Kai (Alkai) and Marination Station (Capitol Hill).   Continue reading Review: Super Six Restaurant, Simply Super

Anti-Racist Organizers Win As Seattle City Council Votes to End Youth Incarceration

by Marcus Harrison Green (Originally published in YES! Magazine)

After a three-year crusade of protest, agitation, and organizing, a Seattle City Council meeting on September 22 brought a major victory to a diverse coalition of youth-prison abolitionists and anti-racist organizers. Continue reading Anti-Racist Organizers Win As Seattle City Council Votes to End Youth Incarceration

Rainier Beach’s Greeter Corners: Community in Action

by Jerrell Davis

In 2012 a project led by the Seattle Youth Violence Prevention Initiative in collaboration with George Mason University’s Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy, the Rainier Beach Action Coalition (the merger of the Rainier Beach Community Empowerment Coalition and Rainier Beach Moving Forward), and the Seattle Neighborhood Group conducted crime research in Rainier Beach. Continue reading Rainier Beach’s Greeter Corners: Community in Action

Op-Ed: What the Whitlatch Case Reveals About Police Reform Efforts

by Tammy Morales

The safety of our community and the mistrust between community members and our police force are among the most pressing issues we face in Seattle. Despite the Seattle Police Department (SPD) being under a US Department of Justice consent decree since 2012 these issues still plague us. Continue reading Op-Ed: What the Whitlatch Case Reveals About Police Reform Efforts

Mayor’s Find It, Fix It Walk Highlights Hillman City’s Concerns, Improvement

by Staff Writer

On Saturday, more than forty Hillman city residents joined Seattle City Mayor Ed Murray along with representatives from the Department of Neighborhoods, the local fire station and the Seattle Police Department’s South Precinct for a jaunt around the South End neighborhood’s ten blocks to catch the ear of the mayor while making city officials aware of needed area improvements. Continue reading Mayor’s Find It, Fix It Walk Highlights Hillman City’s Concerns, Improvement

The Teacher Strike and the Cycle of Poverty

by Hanna Brooks Olsen (Featured Image courtesy of Michael “Renaissance” Moynihan)

If you know one thing about the teacher strike, it’s probably that the teachers are bargaining for higher wages, which is true.

Seattle Public Schools teachers haven’t had a cost of living adjustment in six years — and in that time, rents in Seattle have gone up about 40% in some places, meaning our educators are actively making less money than they were a few years ago, to do the same important job. Continue reading The Teacher Strike and the Cycle of Poverty

Back to School? Not so Fast

by Robin Boland

As you may have heard the Seattle Education Association (SEA) voted unanimously on Thursday to strike if no agreement has been reached with the Seattle Public Schools district by the scheduled start of school on Wednesday, September 9th (their current contract expires Tuesday). The absolute silence when educators were asked for votes accepting the contract was deafening. SEA is made up of approximately 5,000 school employees responsible for the education of 52,000 students (already the math is making my head spin) and their collective voice said “Strike” loud and clear last week. Continue reading Back to School? Not so Fast

Descendant of Chief Seattle Prepares to Welcome South End Festival Attendants Home

Interview conducted by Marcus Harrison Green

Ken Workman. Photo courtesy of interviewee.
Ken Workman. Photo courtesy of interviewee.

This morning’s Rainier Beach Art Walk festival will be a bittersweet “cultural homecoming” for Ken Workman. The great, great, great, great grandson of legendary Duwamish leader and Emerald City namesake Chief Seattle is – like most members of the storied tribe- still shaken by the June announcement the Federal Government would not bestow formal recognition upon them. This, despite other Washington based tribes including the Upper Skagit, Sauk-Suiattle, Stillaguamish, Samish and Snoqualmie having received acknowledgement decades ago. Continue reading Descendant of Chief Seattle Prepares to Welcome South End Festival Attendants Home